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Author Topic: Laser Diode Keyes for Arduino  (Read 3011 times)
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Good morning,
I bought the laser Diode Keyes for Arduino, see link: http://club.dx.com/forums/forums.dx/forum.137473
The device has 3 Pin: (5v) + (-) + (Sens).
How to connect to arduino this components? I need some resistance to limit the current or the current driver is already integrated in the laser electronic board?
What you use it for?
I thought to use it like a switch (to create an high speed photography flash trigger) and I was thinking it was a switch. Can you confirm me that is only a laser emitter (so I need some photoresistance on the other side of the light source).
Thanks for any information.
If you alredy used in other project, let me know.
Best regards!
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Herning, Denmark
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It's an emitter
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Kind regards
Simon Madsen

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Looks like its got a servo connector on it:  Maybe its '-' to ground, middle to +5V, 'S' to a digital pin?

Try and find more definitive information first though.
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Dubuque, Iowa, USA
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The DX site's forum has the answer.

"To operate with a 5V power supply, a series resistor is required. I used a series resistor of 1.2kOhhm, resulting in 2V over the laser and a current of 2.5mA, resulting in 5 mW power dissipation. Connect grounding to the pin marked with a "-". Connect the 1.2KOhm resistor to the pin marked with a "S". Connect other side of the 1.2kOhm resistor to the +5V power supply."

The +5V connection could also be to an Arduino digital pin if you want to control the on/off.

The middle pin on the module is apparently connected to nothing. Which leads one to wonder what the resistor on the module is for...
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Left Coast, CA (USA)
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This is an example of a simple 'raw' laser diode component. It was designed to be driven from a automatic constant current driver circuit that utilizes the 'sensor' pin from the diode as a feedback signal to tell the current driver to raise or lower the current to maintain a constant output with changing ambient temperature, device temperature, etc.

 You can destroy this diode by driving it with just a constant voltage. You can power the diode with a constant voltage source if you include a series resistor of a value that will keep the laser current below it's maximum allowed current under all temperature variation.

 There are laser diode assemblies that have the automatic constant current driver built into the module thus such a module can be powered from a fixed constant voltage source, but this in not one of those.

Lefty

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"
This is an example of a simple 'raw' laser diode component. It was designed to be driven from a automatic constant current driver circuit that utilizes the 'sensor' pin from the diode as a feedback signal to tell the current driver to raise or lower the current to maintain a constant output with changing ambient temperature, device temperature, etc.

Lefty
"

Does the code or driver exist, so that we can integrate it into an arduino board ?

Spenc

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