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Topic: Freelance technical writers wanted for how-to articles (Read 637 times) previous topic - next topic

Smithy468

Hi,

I'm looking for people that would be interested in writing some how-to articles about the Arduino, Raspberry Pi and other topics. The articles will be around 1000-2000 words in length and cover mostly basic level topics. I'll provide the topic and an outline for each article. Authors can work remotely and get paid per article.

Desired skills:
Good at writing in English
Able to explain complex topics clearly, at a novice level
Education in computer science, electrical engineering, or related field is a bonus
Experienced with the Raspberry Pi or Arduino
Intermediate level C, C+, Python, Arduino, or Linux programming

If you're interested, please send me a PM with a little information about yourself and your level of knowledge/experience in these areas. I'll reply with more details.

PaulS

Quote
I'll reply with more details.
How about posting a couple of topics here, and say something about what you are paying?

I could probably do a reasonable job, without pissing too many people off, IF the topics were interesting and the compensation was adequate.
The art of getting good answers lies in asking good questions.

Smithy468

Hi Paul,

For example, a topic might be on how to set up a PIR sensor on the Arduino. Or how to set up the nRF24L01 2.4 Ghz wireless module on the Arduino. The articles would mostly be about configuring different modules on the Arduino. Each article would need to include a simple "hello world" style Arduino program that readers could use to run the module.

We're looking for first/second draft quality material, as we have an editor that can put the final touches on the article. Also, we will handle the images and formatting.

We would be willing to pay around $75 to $100 USD per article. 

J-M-L

The web is full of such articles already - is there a need for more? Or is it a special arduino?
Please do not PM me for help,  others will benefit as well if you post your question publicly on the forums
Pas de messages priv├ęs SVP

INTP

Editor, meaning work done loses all authorship? No credit given? Lose all rights to the work? Where will these tutorials be used?

Smithy468

Hi INTP,

Authors will get 100% credit. Please send me a PM for more details.

Smithy468

Hi UnoWatt,

Our USP is providing in-depth and complete tutorials that a beginner can work through and successfully complete a project. Many of the tutorials on the web are written by electrical engineers or people with many years of experience. While they are perfectly written and do work, they can be "over the head" of most beginners. Our goal is to make the Arduino accessible to anyone with a desire to learn, no matter what their level of experience.


PaulMurrayCbr

Many of the tutorials on the web are written by electrical engineers or people with many years of experience. While they are perfectly written and do work, they can be "over the head" of most beginners.
I'm not sure it's possible to dumb it down below a certain point. You have to know about electrical circuits, you have to be able to program in a regular block-structured language with the usual control constructs.

Then again - maybe that's your USP. But the problem with every learning system that attempts to teach beginners how to X, when X relies on knowing Y which is itself quite complex, is that those systems have to provide their students with a cut-down cutesy-packaged Y. Getting expert in this Y is kinda counterproductive. In computing, the way this plays out is that the tutorials come with an API that you code the lessons to.

Some fields of learning have prerequisites.

I mean - if you can do it, good luck to you. They're handing out microcontrollers to kids in school these days - presumably there's some sort of lesson plan.
http://paulmurraycbr.github.io/ArduinoTheOOWay.html

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