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Topic: Is this possible / Best tools for the job (Read 342 times) previous topic - next topic

eferrer

Hi. I'm new to the arduino community and arduino itself and was curious if this may be right the tool for the job. I have a touchscreen pad that I need to hit seven times. Once in the upper left corner, four times in the middle in two different spots, bottom right three times. I can do all this manually in just under 30 seconds but unfortunately I need to do this thousands of times and don't have the time to spend doing that manually. Can ardunio help me out with my problem? What tools would I need. I sent a pic of the device that I'm touching. Any help for a noob would be appreciated. Thanks.


Koepel

When you know how to write software, then it is possible.
If you are new to programming, then Arduino is a good way to learn it, but not while trying to make this project.

A servo motor is slow, but easy to use. I would use 4 servo motors, one for each location.
It is a capacitive or resistive touchscreen ?

What kind of device are you operating ? Perhaps that device has a serial port and accepts commands.

xl97

You could set some steppers or servos to do the job for you .. if you are looking for manual/mechanical solution.

or perhaps there is a way to send serial (or whatever) data to the screen to trigger a 'touch' at certain X/Y positions


eferrer

#3
Feb 14, 2018, 12:48 am Last Edit: Feb 14, 2018, 02:25 am by eferrer
When you know how to write software, then it is possible.
If you are new to programming, then Arduino is a good way to learn it, but not while trying to make this project.

A servo motor is slow, but easy to use. I would use 4 servo motors, one for each location.
It is a capacitive or resistive touchscreen ?

What kind of device are you operating ? Perhaps that device has a serial port and accepts commands.
Hi. Thanks for the response. I know how to program so I don't think I would have any issues there. It's a diagnostics tool for a car kind of like a GPS.  The device does not have a serial port to take commands so the manual touch was the only way to go. Would the servos be able to go through 6-7 clicks in 30 seconds? Speed is ideal. Any suggestions for a good replacement for a finger that can attach to a servo? I appears to be a capacitive touch screen.

GoForSmoke

1000's of times in how long?  Is that a calibration routine?

Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

eferrer

1000's of times in how long?  Is that a calibration routine?


Probably over the course of a week or two? Not a good idea? Processor not strong enough?

Koepel

The most basic Arduino board is the Arduino Uno, and I think it will take about 1 to 5% of its processing time.
A servo motor is fast enough: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXOSZ0u6Fyk

Robin2

what sort of touch-screen technology is used?

A capacitive touch screen needs more than just touch.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

wvmarle

This can definitely be done with an Arduino, and it's arguably one of the best tools for the job. Just take a look at all those YouTube videos about brute forcing a phone password using an Arduino to control motors that key in the numbers on a touch screen.

The main issue you may have is tuning the servos so the touch is firm enough to be recorded, but they don't shatter the screen in doing so. Making your mechanical finger spring loaded will help.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

eferrer

what sort of touch-screen technology is used?

A capacitive touch screen needs more than just touch.

...R
It's a capacitive touch screen. Any ideas for a finger alternative?

wvmarle

It's got to be conductive.

A sausage is known to work well (that's how people used to do it while wearing gloves - nowadays there are gloves with conductive fingertips).
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

GoForSmoke

#11
Feb 16, 2018, 06:43 am Last Edit: Feb 16, 2018, 06:49 am by GoForSmoke
Probably over the course of a week or two? Not a good idea? Processor not strong enough?
I'm thinking more about the device not obstructing your view for long. Maybe servos with thin bendable fiberglass arms could tap screen spots from the edges or behind the screen then retract but you got more to do depending on resistive or capacitive touch what kind of fingertips to make besides soft and clean. One servo per spot only requires 1 axis motion per servo and all can deploy close to touch as fast as one, could go really fast on spot-to-spot taps otherwise reaching and tapping gets you to move.

Is it worth making unless needed quite often? I guess it is! Might drive me to find solutions different from yours.

An ATmega328P and many smaller AVR's could do this well at 1 MHz clock speed.

I worked on a project 1987-88 that used IR beam interrupt touch screens, we NEVER had to calibrate those!
Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

Robin2

It's a capacitive touch screen. Any ideas for a finger alternative?
Just out of curiosity I tried an experiment with my old Samsung phone. Wearing a rubber kitchen glove the screen would not respond but a piece of hex aluminium bar held in the glove would cause a response - for example selecting an image in the gallery. The piece of aluminium I used is about the size of a 15mm cube and I was touching the flat face to the screen.

Note that a metal probe might scratch the screen.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

GoForSmoke

#13
Feb 16, 2018, 01:05 pm Last Edit: Feb 16, 2018, 01:06 pm by GoForSmoke
Just out of curiosity I tried an experiment with my old Samsung phone. Wearing a rubber kitchen glove the screen would not respond but a piece of hex aluminium bar held in the glove would cause a response - for example selecting an image in the gallery. The piece of aluminium I used is about the size of a 15mm cube and I was touching the flat face to the screen.

Note that a metal probe might scratch the screen.

...R
A capacitance touch only needs the "finger" to have capacitance in line with a person's finger. Any conductor in the finger with a good bit of surface more than mass should do especially if it is grounded to the screen device. Foil should be fine, crumpled a bit'd be even better.

A resistance touch screen might do with some conductive plastic sheet on the tip. The stuff comes in megohms per inch but the touch spot can be 2 or 3mm dia and still work. That finger would need to be grounded to the screen device too. I'd make the activation button a cap sense button mounted on the screen frame, out of the way of tapping toy servo fingers -- force isn't needed for touchscreens, presence works.
Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

Koepel

@GoForSmoke, as far as I know, resistive touch is pressure sensitive. It works like a keyboard. A plastic top and plastic bottom layer with an air gap in between. Pressing the top plastic down connects the invisible conductive traces inside the gap.

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