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Topic: Ontario : Triggering very bright lights using Arduino (Read 539 times) previous topic - next topic

lastchancename

Below the posts, there is a link  "Report to moderator". give that a shot.

Get back in touch if your chosen developer wants more info but I expect he'll be pretty good, otherwise he's going to struggle with all the concurrent action.

Depending on their preference, they will probably sketch out a black cm diagram and game plan - otherwise a project like this can get lost and out of control pretty quickly.  Documentation is really important!
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MrSelleck

Ok sounds good. Thanks for your help.

Although I'm more looking to build/do this myself than off-load it on a developer (I can't really afford that :P)

lastchancename

Maybe i'm different, but this is a very tactile project, and needs the developer to understand exactly why certain hardware decisions were made - and how to interact with that hardware.
Yes it could be done remotely, but the costs involved - regardless of the actual project cost, could make it prohibitive,

What's your level of coding experience?  Any links?  The hardware fabrication is a whole other area of skill.
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MrSelleck

For personal reasons I'm going to hold off on posting anything to my github. But a short summary is that I work for an Analytics Firm that does custom Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence in Python, and I'm currently top 20 on a kaggle competition! In highschool I did some computer engineering and currently build custom high end PCs for people.

I suppose I'll see what the quote would be to guide me on something like this.

Do you have any good guides/tutorials on each of the steps you specified as being necessary?

lastchancename

Because you're looking at Arduino, and this is definitely a real-time system - you'll have to think C/C++ or lower.
The luxury of 4th gen languages will introduce too much variance in timing of (everything). You need to control aspect if execution down to 20-50mS consistently.
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lastchancename

Edit the title...
Sync real-time LEDs to drum kit (Canada)
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gdsports

I suggest looking at the Adafruit site for LED projects to get an idea of what is available. For insanely bright RGB LEDs that can be controlled from an Uno, look no further. Think NeoPixel on steroids.

MrSelleck

Thanks gd! From the description it looks like exactly what I'm looking for. Do you have a good idea of how to chain all the elements described from the posts above?

lastchancename

The Pixie's look like they'll do the job nicely !  USD 15 a pop... (ouch)

OP, organise the (hard part) mounting, comms and code - and you're there.
The nice thing here is that they have a gamma-corrected PWM driver on-board, so nothing else to think about at that level.

Depending on the distance between LEDs and strings, you may look at RS485 for the 2-wire interface at high speeds.
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gdsports

This drum project uses ws281x LEDs and the sound sensor is a microphone. I suggest studying this project to how the CPU (gemma) takes input from the microphone and controls the LEDs. Once you understand how this project works, you can substitute for high power 3W LEDs which means bigger batteries or maybe switch to AC power. Or maybe just use more normal LEDs to get more light.

lastchancename

Nice simple solution.
Easy to learn, then expand when you have the knowledge and experience.
Also easy to do within a month!
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MrSelleck

#26
Oct 10, 2017, 04:07 am Last Edit: Oct 10, 2017, 04:12 am by MrSelleck
Do you think the latency will get very high on a system that uses microphones? Can they be subbed out for the piezo sensors once ready? There's also the issue that with mics you can't control what it reacts to... so if i hit one drum it will trigger other lights most likely, so is it just a matter of switching the sensor? I appreciate you showing me this, looks close to what I want given I can really turn up the brightness.

That looks like a great place to start and could translate easily to my actual use if it just comes down to adding more power + brighter lights.

Thanks you two, before I go and try that, is there any limitations to this method for scaling up? What does the more complicated solution cover that this one wouldn't?

gdsports

Sorry, I have no experience building the project. You may have experiment with microphone vs. piezo to see which works best. There is a gain control for the microphone so turning the gain down might make it react only to its drum. But I am not sure.

MrSelleck

I see, ok. Maybe someone else will see this! Still looking to collab in Ontario :D

aarg

I see, ok. Maybe someone else will see this! Still looking to collab in Ontario :D
How is the project going so far?
  ... with a transistor and a large sum of money to spend ...
Please don't PM me with technical questions. Post them in the forum.

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