Arduino Forum

Using Arduino => General Electronics => Topic started by: larryd on Jan 04, 2017, 08:20 am

Title: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 04, 2017, 08:20 am
How about sharing some tips you use?

Here is one I use often when I need my third hand to give a constant pull.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=193342)

.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on Jan 04, 2017, 03:36 pm
Hi Larry,

I started THIS (http://arduino-info.wikispaces.com/ArduinoHints) on http://ArduinoInfo.Info (http://ArduinoInfo.Info)

May I add yours??

Anyone else??

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 04, 2017, 06:49 pm
Terry, feel free use ideas.


There must be lots of us old guys around with time saving ideas.

Two more ideas.

Make a breadboard friendly Neopixel for software development.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=193387)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=193461)

Make breadboard friendly switch assemblies from two pin SMD switches.
The center header pins are pulled out and discarded.
Avoid plugging header pins next to the center of the breadboard, use these holes for DIP sized pins only.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=193389)
.



Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on Jan 04, 2017, 11:44 pm
Hi Larry, Added those at http://arduino-info.wikispaces.com/ArduinoHints (http://arduino-info.wikispaces.com/ArduinoHints)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Jan 05, 2017, 12:48 am
Someone has to do it.
(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/hakko-production-images/production/398x/t/1/t18-d12_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 05, 2017, 01:14 am
@Jiggy-Ninja
The Hakko soldering iron tips are great.
It is nice to have an assortment of shapes and sizes for different soldering jobs.

As I mentioned in a previous thread, this is my new goto soldering iron tip of choice:
(http://thumbs4.picclick.com/d/l400/pict/271930367687_/5pcs-900M-T-TS-Lead-free-Soldering-Tip-Solder-Iron-Tips.jpg)

Edit
I shouldn't have used goto ???
.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 05, 2017, 02:17 am
Put metal, stainless steel and/or copper, scouring pads into an old tin can to make a convenient soldering iron tip cleaner.
You can find these scouring pads at grocery stores.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=193471)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 06, 2017, 06:35 am
Use an old nail polish bottle to hold liquid flux for soldering.
Clean out the dried polish from the bottle using Acetone.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=193628)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Jan 06, 2017, 07:08 pm
Really useful tips LarryD.  Thank you.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: pert on Jan 07, 2017, 12:48 am
Put metal, stainless steel and/or copper, scouring pads into an old tin can to make a convenient soldering iron tip cleaner.
Any preference between stainless and copper. Is there any benefit to using both metals or was that just because you bought  a combo pack of pads? What about brass? I think that's what's in the one I have. Have you compared these to using a wet sponge? I've never used a sponge but always wondered if there was a drawback to this style of tip cleaner.

Use an old nail polish bottle to hold liquid flux for soldering.
Any reason why you prefer this to the squeeze bottles with the syringe tips? I recently got one of those and much prefer it because if I accidentally knock the bottle over it's only a drop spilled at the most.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 07, 2017, 03:01 am
Personally I like to use a damp sponge at times.
I find it shocks the iron prior to tinning the tip and I think I get better results.

Metal hardness would be stainless brass and then copper.
If there is a concern whether the irons tip will wear then copper would be a good choice.
Stainless is more abrasive.
Stainless does not let melted solder adhere to it so it does not get loaded with solder.
Brass is more expensive and harder to find here.

I have purchased stainless and copper in separate packaging only.

I prefer using copper pads as long as the iron does not cool down sitting in it.
If it does, the iron will then stick to the copper where there is contact.
Having both stainless an copper lets you decide which to use at a given time.


I use a plastic squeeze bottle with a syringe needle where I need to flood an area.

In the image, you will see a plastic insert, its  purpose is to prevent fluid leaking out when the bottle is tipped over.
I like using the brush that comes with the bottle as it can apply flux accurately on the work.
A brush is also better when working on vertical components.

Edit
Don't let the owners bottle know you stole it ;)
.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: MarkT on Jan 07, 2017, 03:07 am
It makes sense to only use a cleaning pad that is softer than the iron-plated surface of a soldering
bit, otherwise you will abrade that surface and shorten the life of the bit - so copper OK, stainless not
OK.  Wet sponge is all I normally use personally.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: pert on Jan 07, 2017, 07:54 am
I've never had the solder stick to the brass and it's softer than stainless steel so I guess that's a pretty good material for the  purpose, though less readily available for making a DIY tip cleaner. I bought a pre-made one on eBay from China for <$2USD w/ free shipping. I pull the brass out of the can every so often and all the little bits of solder fall out with a couple taps.

I didn't realize the purpose of the plastic insert. That would have come in handy a couple times with my old flux bottle. I ended up gluing the thing to a piece of steel flat bar to give it a stable base.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Jan 08, 2017, 09:59 pm
If you've got some thing you need to use frequently that requires a complicated wiring arrangement, make a jig on some protoboard so you will know it works every time and not have to fiddle around with troubleshooting it every time you wire it up.

I made jigs for reprogramming chips outside of an Arduino board.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=193934)
Above are two examples of programming jigs I made. One is a ZIF socket soldered onto a protoshield that lets me use the ArduinoISP sketch on an Uno to program a chip (in this case, an ATtiny4313).

The other is some male headers soldered onto a 6-wide protoboard (http://www.ebay.com/itm/8Pcs-2cm-x-8cm-Electronic-DIY-Prototype-Paper-Double-Side-PCB-Universal-Board-/311480407138?&_trksid=p2056016.m2516.l5255). The 2x3 header on top lets me plug in the standard programmer ribbon cable, and the headers on bottom are spaced just wide enough to be able to plug this over a DIP package in a breadboard. You just need to grab the right jig and plug it over the chip to reprogram it in circuit. The one pictured is made for an ATtiny85.

I have one of each jig made for ATtiny85, ATtiny84, ATtiny4313, and ATmega328P.

Which reminds me, I need to whip some up for the ATtiny10 and various PICs I bought.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 08, 2017, 11:21 pm
@Jiggy-Ninja
That is a great idea.
I purchased 10 of these boards to do something similar.
eg: I plan on making these: IR remote control, Temperature, RTC, ultra sonic distance sensor and RFID.
Once made up, I will be able to just plug and play ;)

http://www.banggood.com/10Pcs-Prototyping-Shield-PCB-Board-For-Arduino-p-1013120.html?rmmds=myorder (http://www.banggood.com/10Pcs-Prototyping-Shield-PCB-Board-For-Arduino-p-1013120.html?rmmds=myorder)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=193941)


WARNING the PCB linked to here has a circuit error.
You Must corrected this error before you plug it onto an Arduino.


(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195407)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 08, 2017, 11:27 pm
For projects requiring motor mounting or to temporarily mounting other components to prove a design, consider using copper clad PCB material. 
This material is: very strong, easily drilled, filed, hole punched and cut.
It solders well and conducts electricity.
Common thicknesses of copper clad board are 1/32 1/16 and 1/8".

It does oxidize :(

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=193943)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=193945)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=193947)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=193949)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TomGeorge on Jan 09, 2017, 06:11 am
Hi,
Spray lacquer on the front and look really good bit of retro.

Tom.... :)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 09, 2017, 06:26 am
Yes spray lacquer does work nicely.

When you need to solder a small PCB on one of the panels it gets a real mess with the lacquer .


This is the second time I built this unit as the old one looked like hell after 2 years of soldering.

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 11, 2017, 07:06 am
Use an old heavy coffee cup to hold your small hand tools.

(http://i.imgur.com/kdakcZ7.jpg)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on Jan 11, 2017, 09:24 am
WOW. I gotta catch up on these!!

This all points out that mechanical stuff like mounting and connecting devices and acquiring and using tools is one of the hardest things, especially for newbies. 

I've spend more time and effort on the mechanical considerations of This Project (http://arduino-info.wikispaces.com/Project-GlassKilnController) than I have on code.  SO FAR..
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 13, 2017, 04:00 am
http://www.ebay.com/itm/321985115125 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/321985115125)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=194504)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 14, 2017, 09:35 pm
Sealing plastic bags.

Anti static bags.
Take your least used (crappiest) soldering iron tip, adjust temperature to 500'C, clean tip.
Lay a bag (to be sealed) on a flat surface with a silicone baking sheet under the bag.
Place a metal ruler at the point of required sealing.
Draw the iron tip at ~1 second per inch along the straight edge.

For zip lock freezer bags, turn the temperature down to ~400'C.

You will have to experiment with speed for your conditions.
.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 15, 2017, 01:46 am
No measuring.
Making inserts, panels etc. to fit the inside of a box or enclosure.

Attached is a PDF which discusses the process of making an inside template.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=194690)

Attached is the PDF file with all the instruction images.

You can use 3Ms correction and cover-up  tape in this process.

(http://www.staples-3p.com/s7/is/image/Staples/s0180742_sc7?$splssku$)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 15, 2017, 05:14 am
I guess there are others who have the same crappy soldering iron holder.

Attached is the 1:1 PDF for the sides and the back which you can use to cut out your own inserts.
I just eye balled the front piece.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=194699)

.





Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TomGeorge on Jan 15, 2017, 07:31 am
Hi,
At work I have to calibrate a device that requires its Program ROM to be removed and a calibration ROM fitted, just to cal the device.
The Cal ROM is plugged and unplugged about 100 times a year, so to protect its bendable/breakable leads we have it fitted into a machined DIP socket and we then plug the machined socket into the ROM socket.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=194708)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=194710)
Unfortunately we cannot do it to the Program ROM due to PCB clearance problems so the Program ROM is removed and fitted with the appropriate tools


So if you do not have ICSP provision on your custom PCB and need to swap out your 328 to a UNO PCB to program it , fit it with a machined DIP socket to protect its bendable pins.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=194712)

Tom... :) 
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 15, 2017, 08:23 am
Tom
The sacrificial socket is a good idea.

I remember getting EPROMS back from the field with #22AWG wire soldered to broken pins ???
Good old days.

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on Jan 15, 2017, 03:31 pm
I'll catch up soon....
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 16, 2017, 03:17 am
Attached is a PDF discussing making holes for mounting components in panels.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=194806)


Attached is the PDF file with all the instruction images.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 17, 2017, 09:49 am
Links to previous threads:

Test Lead Stuff (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=436498.0)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=436498.0;attach=187669)

Small Wire Segments (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=353064.msg2433928#main_content_section)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=353064.0;attach=140423)

Heat Shrink Ideas (https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445334.0)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445334.0;attach=192934)

Making up DuPont connectors (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=376971.msg2599211#msg2599211)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=376971.0;attach=153668)

IDC Cables (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=389546.0)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=389546.0;attach=160695)

Managing Your Wiring (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=381469.0)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=381469.0;attach=156096)

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: pert on Jan 17, 2017, 10:33 am
Test Lead Stuff (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=436498.0)
I was meaning to post the dupont multimeter probes I made like that to this thread. Mine are dedicated leads instead of having the connectors like yours. I find those super useful and like how easy they are to use when breadboarding a circuit, rather than having some large probe handles with thick wires getting in the way.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 17, 2017, 07:40 pm
I was meaning to post the dupont multimeter probes I made like that to this thread. Mine are dedicated leads instead of having the connectors like yours. I find those super useful and like how easy they are to use when breadboarding a circuit, rather than having some large probe handles with thick wires getting in the way.
In some situations, I use connectors made by the JST people.
Doing this helps keep the number of dedicated cables down to a minimum.

Using the male header end, it's great to plug your cable into the test equipment then straight into a breadboard.
Not having to hold test leads or use alligator clips on breadboards is very convenient.

https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=444118.msg3062937#msg3062937  (https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=444118.msg3062937#msg3062937)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=444118.0;attach=192798)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on Jan 17, 2017, 09:11 pm
Hi Larry,
Quote
PDF discussing making holes for mounting components in panels.
Where did this come from?  Any sources for those tools?

I just bought a step drill to make 7/8" holes for large pilot lights. A greenlee chassis punch is now up to $50 or so :-(

I'll grab some of the rest of this!
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 18, 2017, 01:29 am
Hi Larry, Where did this come from?  Any sources for those tools?

I just bought a step drill to make 7/8" holes for large pilot lights. A greenlee chassis punch is now up to $50 or so :-(

I'll grab some of the rest of this!
These are tools I use for chassis work.
I put the PDFs together to present the topics.

I got the Body Reamer from Banggood.   Must have tool. I think this one. (http://www.banggood.com/Universal-0-14mm-Professional-Reaming-Knife-Drill-Tool-Edge-Reamer-p-922461.html?rmmds=search)

Hole punch from http://www.firemountaingems.com/itemdetails/h203955tl  (http://www.firemountaingems.com/itemdetails/h203955tl)
Brad bits from Leevalley.
Unibit and Diamond Needle Files from eBay, not sure which seller.
Other tools at local Bolts Supply houses.

Greenlee. ???
(https://s3.amazonaws.com/cesco-content/unilog/Batch4/783310/93073-ProductImageURL.jpg)

Reminds me of the old tube days and making metal chassis for circuitry. ;)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 18, 2017, 03:20 am
We all do it now and then.
If you have a few extra plugs and a spare hour, make up a Voltage/Current test cable.
This speeds up testing and gets rid of those ugly alligator clips.


(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195054)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195056)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 18, 2017, 03:25 am
PCB vice.
You may have to tweek the clamps with a file to adjust the fit.

These are obviously for low profile SMD component boards before headers are soldered. ;)

These are handy to hold your PCBs while you solder components on the board.
At $7.00 they are reasonably priced.
The two holes in the base are for securing the fixture to a heavier sub-surface.

PCB vice. (http://www.banggood.com/Universal-PCB-Holder-Fixtures-Mobile-Phone-Repairing-Soldering-Iron-Rework-Tool-p-1028603.html?rmmds=search)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195058)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: tinman13kup on Jan 18, 2017, 03:56 am
PCB vice.
You may have to tweek the clamps with a file to adjust the fit.

These are handy to hold your PCBs while you solder components on the board.
At $7.00 they are reasonably priced.
The two holes in the base are for securing the fixture to a heavier sub-surface.

PCB vice. (http://www.banggood.com/Universal-PCB-Holder-Fixtures-Mobile-Phone-Repairing-Soldering-Iron-Rework-Tool-p-1028603.html?rmmds=search)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195058)

.
Getting ready to make one of these. Just need to get in the garage and do it.

What do you have for putting solder paste on small pads?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 18, 2017, 04:15 am
Getting ready to make one of these. Just need to get in the garage and do it.

What do you have for putting solder paste on small pads?
I was going to make a solder paste dispenser but found this one, bought two.
https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=429915.0 (https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=429915.0)

The designer said he was coming out with a new version in 2017.

Retired but new one coming. (https://www.tindie.com/products/marjan_mike/solder-paste-dispenser-v5-air-free-paste-extruder-/)

(https://d3s5r33r268y59.cloudfront.net/24691/products/thumbs/2016-06-14T14:02:34.733Z-Dispenser%20V5%20USB.jpg.855x570_q85_pad_rcrop.jpg)

(https://d3s5r33r268y59.cloudfront.net/24691/products/thumbs/2016-06-16T01:01:19.571Z-Dispenser%20V5%20T.JPG.855x570_q85_pad_rcrop.jpg)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: tinman13kup on Jan 18, 2017, 04:59 am
The problem I have is the needle is 4x bigger than the pad I'm trying to paste. I've resorted to using a toothpick and pluck some out of the end of the needle and dab it where I want it. I've been playing with a lot of 0402 smds and am trying some 0201s on my next board. They don't need much paste. Many of the ic's (LQFP) I'm using really don't want much solder.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 18, 2017, 05:15 am
:o  0201s  :o
Don't sneeze!

Nothing wrong with a tooth pick if it works.
I used a dental pick for a while.

I assume you have a Microscope.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/34/SMT_sizes%2C_based_on_original_by_Zureks.svg/330px-SMT_sizes%2C_based_on_original_by_Zureks.svg.png)

008004  That's just not right  :smiley-small:
(http://www.murata.com/~/media/webrenewal/about/newsroom/news/products/emc/2013/0924/0924_img0001.ashx?h=213&la=en&mw=320&w=320)


Lots here use stencils, I have not gotten into these yet but I suppose it would be easy enough to cut them out on the CAM tool.
.

Edit:
I was going to suggest that you make one of these:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJWUUK1s_G0 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJWUUK1s_G0)

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195080)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 18, 2017, 05:36 am
Use breadboard helper boards to quickly test your circuit designs and sketch code.
When you come up with a design you often use, make a PCB to plug and play. ;)

I/O one place (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=259819.msg1834723#msg1834723)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=259819.0;attach=91553)
Bobweeney from CrossRoads Atmega1284:
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=259819.0;attach=91545)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=259819.0;attach=93418)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=259819.0;attach=96045)

LED helper:
  (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=441436.msg3038872#msg3038872)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=441436.0;attach=190841)
(http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/GTUAAOSwmtJXYkrV/s-l1600.jpg)
(http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/miAAAOSwh-1W6Azh/s-l400.jpg)

ATtinyX5 Breadboard Helper  (https://github.com/JChristensen/bbhTinyX5)

(https://raw.githubusercontent.com/JChristensen/bbhTinyX5/master/bbh1.jpg)


Ardweeny (https://solarbotics.com/product/kardw/)

(https://cdn.solarbotics.com/products/photos/ad1b35d7231ee2b1fd5c905bcd8c3348/ardw-img_0351.jpg?w=800)

Power Supply for breadboard (https://solarbotics.com/product/34020/)

(https://cdn.solarbotics.com/products/photos/9ba90f55b2ba25212387337ba1e0b024/34020-DSCN1549.jpg?w=375)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: fettkeewl on Jan 18, 2017, 03:26 pm
Dont be afraid to add stuff you need directly on a board ^^

This is a programming board for the ESP8266-01 that I modified with a button and two wires.
In standard operating mode the esp8266 will run its loaded firmware / arduino code when plugged in,
however holding the button when connecting your device pulls gpio0 to ground allowing you to program the device.

The button is hotglued to the female header. Could do 1 more on the opposite side for device reset..

(https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/1cccf05a3a717789d97f2199d9093b67092d9d65f570d79d3d7dfa591f6cd161.jpg?w=600&h=348)

(https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/376315446a3491dbdd981c9fef02e9751aca9a6eff2cef02954c8cb357d6c36d.jpg?w=600&h=348)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on Jan 18, 2017, 07:23 pm
Wow Larry.. Just WOW..
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: tinman13kup on Jan 19, 2017, 03:26 am
:o  0201s  :o
Don't sneeze!

I assume you have a Microscope.
Funny you say that. I seem to have picked up a nasty cold. As for the microscope, not a desktop unit yet. I'm using 25x loupe glasses. The focal length is a bit tight with a rework gun. I'm looking for a nice microscope like you have.

I was going to suggest that you make one of these:

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195080)

I have one. I think it would just suck them up. I bought plenty of spares. I think 100 were only $1.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 19, 2017, 05:47 am
Dont be afraid to add stuff you need directly on a board ^^

This is a programming board for the ESP8266-01 that I modified with a button and two wires.
In standard operating mode the esp8266 will run its loaded firmware / arduino code when plugged in,
however holding the button when connecting your device pulls gpio0 to ground allowing you to program the device.

The button is hotglued to the female header. Could do 1 more on the opposite side for device reset..
Yes, we all add things sooner or later to existing circuits.

You can use small pieces of PCB material, glue them to an existing PCB then add components to these pieces.

Here are some suggestion on the process.

Add components to a PCB. (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=346333.0)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=346333.0;attach=137269)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195228)

Board segments (http://www.qrpme.com/?p=product&id=MEP)
(http://www.qrpme.com/images/MePads7.jpg)

(http://www.qrpme.com/images/STIX.jpg)

Came across this technique  while back, I do like it for adding things to PCBs.
(https://i2.wp.com/www.pbase.com/daverichards/image/136603886/original.jpg)

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: uxomm on Jan 19, 2017, 01:17 pm
Thank you LarryD!
It is so inspiring!
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: tinman13kup on Jan 20, 2017, 01:01 am
Any thoughts on this model microscope? /s-l1600.jpg]twin boom[/url]
(http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/k1IAAOSwgHZYCpu7/s-l1600.jpg)

It has a working distance of 4in. There is a cheaper model with single arm with a working distance of 6in.
(http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/30wAAOSwnLdWs8Fj/s-l1600.jpg)

I need something, but it has to work. The second one is half the cost of the first ($170/$370)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 20, 2017, 05:05 am
This is the one I settled on and got.   65 pounds weight!
It has simul-focus so the third eye piece is independent of the two front ones.

(http://lghttp.33652.nexcesscdn.net/80F3FE/amscope/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/1200x1200/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/s/t/stereo-microscope-sm-4ntp-01_1_1_1_1.jpg)


Here is the thread it was discussed:  
Microscope (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=420974.msg2914718#msg2914718)


I definitely recommend it.

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 20, 2017, 07:07 am
If you've got some thing you need to use frequently that requires a complicated wiring arrangement, make a jig on some protoboard so you will know it works every time and not have to fiddle around with troubleshooting it every time you wire it up.

I made jigs for reprogramming chips outside of an Arduino board.

Above are two examples of programming jigs I made. One is a ZIF socket soldered onto a protoshield that lets me use the ArduinoISP sketch on an Uno to program a chip (in this case, an ATtiny4313).

The other is some male headers soldered onto a 6-wide protoboard (http://www.ebay.com/itm/8Pcs-2cm-x-8cm-Electronic-DIY-Prototype-Paper-Double-Side-PCB-Universal-Board-/311480407138?&_trksid=p2056016.m2516.l5255). The 2x3 header on top lets me plug in the standard programmer ribbon cable, and the headers on bottom are spaced just wide enough to be able to plug this over a DIP package in a breadboard. You just need to grab the right jig and plug it over the chip to reprogram it in circuit. The one pictured is made for an ATtiny85.

I have one of each jig made for ATtiny85, ATtiny84, ATtiny4313, and ATmega328P.

Which reminds me, I need to whip some up for the ATtiny10 and various PICs I bought.
Further to this, here is how I make up a shield like yours.
After coming up with the schematic, I import an image of the front and back of the 'Shield' into a program like Snagit.
I get images of the components to be mounted and size them to 1:1
After placing the components at the best locations for my application I layout how the wires are to be run.
I then print out a 2:1 paper copy.
I solder things up as shown in the images below.

I use wire warp wire or magnet wire to make interconnections.
Wire Wrap Wire 30AWG (https://www.adafruit.com/product/1446)

(https://www.circuitspecialists.com/content/image/45764/300/1blue.jpg)

38AWG Roadrunner/Vero wire (http://cpc.farnell.com/roadrunner/rrp-p-105/wiring-pencil-wire-pink-38swg/dp/CB01209)

Vero Wire (http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/test-lead-wire/5080792/)

(http://cpc.farnell.com/productimages/standard/en_GB/42246340.jpg)


(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195401)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195526)


WARNING the PCB linked in POST # 14 has a circuit error.    >:(
You MUST corrected this error before you plug it onto an Arduino.  

See Post #14 for the corrected image.

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 21, 2017, 12:47 am
Point to Point wiring PDF guide for breadboards.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195528)



Attached is the PDF file with all the instruction images.

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 21, 2017, 10:14 pm
For those who are interested, here are 600DPI images for some common protoboards.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195626)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 21, 2017, 10:16 pm
Three and Four.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 21, 2017, 10:17 pm
And Five.

Title: This THREAD started pretty well
Post by: arduinoaleman on Jan 21, 2017, 11:10 pm
This THREAD started pretty well

The basic idea is excellent.

However, as everyone can see it ended up in a complete mess.

I really wish there was a separate tab in the arduino forum with
problem solutions and technical hints.

I am thinking of a collection of solutions.

Good ones, bad ones, .... there should be a structure,
so you can find what you expect to find.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: pert on Jan 21, 2017, 11:21 pm
However, as everyone can see it ended up in a complete mess.
Seems your post would tend to push it in that direction.

there should be a structure,
so you can find what you expect to find.

If you want structure use the Arduino Playground (http://playground.arduino.cc/). Forum threads are not suited to organizing information. Their only valid use is discussion.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 21, 2017, 11:41 pm
This THREAD started pretty well

The basic idea is excellent.

However, as everyone can see it ended up in a complete mess.

I really wish there was a separate tab in the arduino forum with
problem solutions and technical hints.

I am thinking of a collection of solutions.

Good ones, bad ones, .... there should be a structure,
so you can find what you expect to find.

What's here that shouldn't be?

There are a lot of hobbyists here and there must be some unique ways of doing things that others could benefit from knowing about.  
Hoping people would contribute their ideas but that failed quite miserably.

In closing, I cannot get things working quite right.  :(

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195642)

.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Jan 22, 2017, 12:43 am
Quote
it ended up in a complete mess.
I think the complete mess is all in your mind.

Thank you for the ideas LarryD.
Title: Please go through the whole THREAD
Post by: arduinoaleman on Jan 22, 2017, 01:12 am
Please go through the whole THREAD

it started so nice .....

No matter if like you my words (see above) or not

Just say what you think - in case you dare.

This forum requires better questions
(most of the time it is hard to understand the original problem)

and this forum requires better answers.

Do not answer questions when the question is not clear.
Before giving an answer, better ask another question.

The

GOOD OLD BOYS are doing this.
The Newbees ..... ?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: allanhurst on Jan 22, 2017, 01:51 am
Quite..

but many people posting here are entirely new to an exciting new hobby (for them) and need encouragement and help - which many experienced engineers here are glad to give.

Perhaps some of them will go on to be the professional engineers of the future.

Naturally much of it is unstructured and ignorant - but not to be despised.

This isn't a place for IEE(E) learned  papers

I've made loads of  cock-ups  myself - haven't we all?

"it seemed a good idea at the time.. duh"

regards

Allan
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: tinman13kup on Jan 22, 2017, 03:44 am
Maybe it has something to do with some posters not speaking English as a first language.

Perhaps it has something to do with a barely in the teens kid getting an Arduino for their birthday and trying to play around with it.

Then there's always the middle aged guys who want to do a specific task and are trying to make what they want to accomplish the task.

If a post doesn't meet your expectations, you don't have to click on it, and certainly don't have to feel obliged to read each and every post.

All the posts Larry has made are great. Personally, I might only use a few to meet my needs, but others might find other tips useful. I doubt I would ever buy my wife a power supply for her birthday, because I'm positive she is in more need of a stereo microscope, but hey, it gave me the idea.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 22, 2017, 06:34 pm
I made one of these a while back.
Works quite well.

Use Loctite in the holes.

http://vpapanik.blogspot.ca/?view=classic (http://vpapanik.blogspot.ca/?view=classic)

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Y9u7mu0WTT0/VNEKYm6JsPI/AAAAAAAAHq0/GZKz-wYoi_I/s1600/2015-02-03%2B17.49.33.jpg)

Edit
You can add more weight at the end with a neodymium magnet.


Going to have to try this:

(https://i.stack.imgur.com/Y8vTN.jpg)



Edit:
See post 124 and 210


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Jan 22, 2017, 07:28 pm
Now see, brilliant stuff like that is what this thread was made for!
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Jan 22, 2017, 08:05 pm
In #59, bottom photo, is that a fan?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 22, 2017, 08:27 pm
In #59, bottom photo, is that a fan?
Yes 12v, for blowing or sucking the flux fumes away from the immediate area.  ;)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Jan 22, 2017, 08:37 pm
Before he was a Colonel, Mr. Bill Kilgore said, "I love the smell of solder flux in the morning."  True story.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 22, 2017, 11:12 pm
With a little imagination and some activated charcoal you could come up with an adequate air filter.

(http://i.imgur.com/NiKoQJX.jpg)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: tinman13kup on Jan 22, 2017, 11:38 pm
I made one of these a while back.
Works quite well.

http://vpapanik.blogspot.ca/?view=classic (http://vpapanik.blogspot.ca/?view=classic)

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Y9u7mu0WTT0/VNEKYm6JsPI/AAAAAAAAHq0/GZKz-wYoi_I/s1600/2015-02-03%2B17.49.33.jpg)

Edit
You can add more weight at the end with a neodymium magnet.

This is something I've been wanting to make. I had plans for making it a part of a jig that holds the pcb, but I was unsure if the small point would try to penetrate the smd when heat was applied. I was planning on using a spring loaded adjustable arm with an aluminum tip.
  I've had problems in the past with some of the small ic's shifting just enough to cause problems, which I will admit I bring on myself by using leadless chips, but I rather like them in the end product.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 22, 2017, 11:58 pm
On Mine, I used a stainless steel bolt for the weight and the pivot bearing.
Used the section that has no threads.
The part on the table was made 1 inch long.

(http://cdn3.bigcommerce.com/s-vgy7md/products/155/images/420/FB02204_A4_H1024__81751.1445803449.1280.1280.png?c=2)

For the rod, I used a .064 .08 inch stainless steel welding rod cut to length and sharpened on the business end.


Edit:
Never had problems with the point going into a component.
If you put a set screw in the weight you could easily adjust its position on the rod.

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 23, 2017, 12:38 am
To add a series resistor to a LED, consider this using this method.

Add heat shrink as needed to the assembly.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195783)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 23, 2017, 12:43 am
Karma point to the first person who knows what this is:

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195785)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: CrossRoads on Jan 23, 2017, 01:18 am
Springs for a reverb/echo effects box. Little on the short side.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: CrossRoads on Jan 23, 2017, 01:21 am
I like the resistor/LED method also, end of with sturdy legs to plug into breadboards.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 23, 2017, 02:08 am
Springs for a reverb/echo effects box. Little on the short side.
Now you cannot be that old.  ;)

This is a 'Pull Spring Vise tool'

I made my first version of this back in my teens. Only a couple of years ago.

This is a more pretty version of the same tool I came up with back then.

Here is a PDF discussion of the construction and use of this pull spring vise tool:

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195795)


Attached is the PDF file with all the instruction images.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: CrossRoads on Jan 23, 2017, 04:35 am
Oh yeah. Bought a Kustom guitar amp back in like 1981, took out the reverb spring box and made an op-amp buffer for it instead so I could use it separately from the amp.

I've only done a project or two, back in 1981, using point to point soldering with ethernet type wiring to regular PCB sockets epoxied down on perfboard when I was a co-op student (like an intern) in college.  Then the lab lead showed me wirewrap, and I've never done point to point soldering since unless it was a dirt-simple project, and even then I  hated doing it.  Any one-off projects now are wirewrapped, and the pins cut short if the board needs to be lower height.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Jan 23, 2017, 03:46 pm
Quote
To add a series resistor to a LED, consider this using this method.
That is a pretty good idea.  
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 23, 2017, 07:13 pm
Interesting.
I thought the spring vise PDF would have had some interest.
I guess if you haven't done tinning of a lot of individual wires without a solder pot, one wouldn't appreciate the clamping action of a spring on all your wires at once. ;)

Solder pot.
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/413Yd1IGOUL.jpg)


vs

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195901)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195903)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 23, 2017, 10:29 pm
When hand soldering very small SMD devices, it is a must to use small diameter solder, ~0.3 mm.
Using this small sized solder becomes difficult for large fingers.

A sewing bobbin in an old dental floss container solves handling problems.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195921)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195923)




BTW, these bobbins make great pulleys in your motor projects.



.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 24, 2017, 06:22 pm
My wife was not impressed with my ability to get small items into the trash.
So, she made me this on bench solution.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196023)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196025)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 24, 2017, 06:27 pm
If you have a head magnifier, consider adding one of these high intensity lamps to the visor.

Adding one of these makes things much easier to inspect.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Portable-LED-Head-Light-Lamp-Work-With-Dental-Surgical-Binocular-Loupes-/401245527297?var=&hash=item5d6c18dd01:m:mnXqXdhnNqg30oL3ue2-yqg (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Portable-LED-Head-Light-Lamp-Work-With-Dental-Surgical-Binocular-Loupes-/401245527297?var=&hash=item5d6c18dd01:m:mnXqXdhnNqg30oL3ue2-yqg)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196028)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 25, 2017, 06:38 pm
Plated through hole (PTH) components are still used in projects.  
Diodes, transistors, resistors and DIP I.C.s leads are inserted through drilled holes in the PCB and then soldered.
When the PCB is component side up all is good, when the board is turned over for soldering, the components falls away from the PCB.  
Usually the leads of these components are bent prior to turning the board upside down so they don't fall out.  

The jig described below removes the need for bending leads.  
A compression board, with foam attached, is placed on top of the PCB with the components.
Clips are added to this assembly to slightly compress the foam which in turn presses all the components firmly against the PCB.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196170)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196172)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196174)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 25, 2017, 06:45 pm
When you solder SMD components store them in the wells of a heavy Pyrex or porcelain spot plate.
These are also good for holding glues and mixing Epoxy when you are applying small dabs under SMDs.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196176)

.


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Watcher on Jan 25, 2017, 08:25 pm
Regarding post 78, what kind of foam is it?  Isnt it affected by the heat from soldering on the other side?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 25, 2017, 09:10 pm
Don't use foam rubber or polyurethane foam.

What's used is melamine foam, often the same type found in kitchen sponges.

The first foam pad I use (for resistors, diodes etc.) is a higher density as seen below.
After ~300 PCBs you can see the wear on it.

The one in the image in post #78 is lower density for higher height components.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196200)


However, you can test samples of foam that you have around and if they work, who's to argue not to use it.
Soldering time is only ~1 second at 350'C at the point of contact.
Not sure what the other side of the component temperature is.   :smiley-neutral:


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Jan 25, 2017, 09:30 pm
What's used is melamine foam, often the same type found in kitchen sponges.
Soldering sponges?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 26, 2017, 01:42 am
Soldering sponges?
Soldering sponges (at least the ones I use for tip cleaning) are very hard when dry.
The foam I mentioned is always flexible/soft.

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 26, 2017, 08:25 pm
We converted from Braun to Sonicare tooth brushes, 8 months now.
I saved the old electric tooth brush and have been using it with IPA to clean PCBs.
The combo does a super job in the cleanup of flux residue on PCBs. You use less IPA too.

You can make yourself a heavier-duty flux removing solution with: half and half 99% API and 100% acetone.
First try it on a small area to make sure it doesn't harm the finish.
It might soften some plastics, but I have found it to be safe on electronic parts.


(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196303)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 27, 2017, 05:13 am
This is similar to the spring vise seen in post 71, but a bit easier to build.
I prefer the one with two springs.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196360)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 27, 2017, 06:14 pm
One of the tasks I don't look forward to is cutting a female header to length.
It is becoming very difficult to find the old header style that has break points in-between pins.
Most female headers today are a smooth strip of 36 or 40 pins and you must sacrifice one of these pins when you cut the strip in two.
The jig shown below flush trims a header at a right angle.
A length of 80 grid sand paper is stuck to a flat piece of 1/16" aluminum with double stick tape.
The above is used to sand flush the rough edges of the header.
The jig is made from a piece of nylon, which resists sanding action.
It takes only a few seconds to get a header flush trimmed.
A wire brush is great to clean the sand paper after use.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196435)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196437)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196439)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196441)


.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: CrossRoads on Jan 27, 2017, 06:24 pm
www.dipmicro.com (http://www.dipmicro.com) has 6, 8, 10, and 18 long lead female headers.
If just PCB mount  length are needed, www.pololu.com (http://www.pololu.com) has all the different lengths needed.


Many different lengths are also available from www.samtec.com (http://www.samtec.com) Search for SSQ-103-03-L-D for example for a 2x3 female  header with long leads.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: polymorph on Jan 27, 2017, 11:35 pm
Don't pay $6 a sponge for your soldering sponge. They are just cheap cellulose sponges.

Dollar stores carry packs of 4 sponges, from which you can usually make 2 or 3 per sponge. I cut slits in them about 1/2 to 2/3 through and a small hole in the center while dry, helps wipe the tips.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 27, 2017, 11:51 pm
@polymorph

Don't pay $6 a sponge for your soldering sponge. They are just cheap cellulose sponges.

Dollar stores carry packs of 4 sponges, from which you can usually make 2 or 3 per sponge. I cut slits in them about 1/2 to 2/3 through and a small hole in the center while dry, helps wipe the tips.
Good hint.
$1.50 for 4 sponges here.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196481)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 28, 2017, 09:08 am
I had forgotten about these sponges.

Miracle Compressed Sponges:

https://www.google.ca/search?q=Miracle+Compressed+Sponges&rlz=1C9BKJA_enCA713CA713&hl=en-US&prmd=isvn&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&fir=JDhgMTfolTzn3M%253A%252CLwLCpuQQvoK2NM%252C_%253BPPQnyDfq2ir3_M%253A%252CC6iVHhQpUrXZKM%252C_%253B52msdQM4RuUPwM%253A%252C0goF0501JThu1M%252C_%253B420_kD2UNk3WJM%253A%252C3RgqWXAr6tdsvM%252C_%253BHtN4TagOLZ7iDM%253A%252CZOhZburQOsHslM%252C_%253BMnv_TdynYz9zrM%253A%252CQWTnJDaXefboIM%252C_%253BPDuBGZ7-LZgPRM%253A%252CCk-C8gMfA7SJFM%252C_%253Bq77MsC6X6o6iFM%253A%252Cq2HwkEmifDVvZM%252C_%253BVhGY5VytUVPCCM%253A%252C7_92hDa8zd5jGM%252C_%253BKxSmLgz0I_ujNM%253A%252CQWTnJDaXefboIM%252C_&usg=__vRVZ1LTrzl724JBeuTKf4llq6F8%3D&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj71a_4sOTRAhVQ1WMKHfvcDzEQsAQIHw&biw=1024&bih=748&dpr=2 (https://www.google.ca/search?q=Miracle+Compressed+Sponges&rlz=1C9BKJA_enCA713CA713&hl=en-US&prmd=isvn&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&fir=JDhgMTfolTzn3M%253A%252CLwLCpuQQvoK2NM%252C_%253BPPQnyDfq2ir3_M%253A%252CC6iVHhQpUrXZKM%252C_%253B52msdQM4RuUPwM%253A%252C0goF0501JThu1M%252C_%253B420_kD2UNk3WJM%253A%252C3RgqWXAr6tdsvM%252C_%253BHtN4TagOLZ7iDM%253A%252CZOhZburQOsHslM%252C_%253BMnv_TdynYz9zrM%253A%252CQWTnJDaXefboIM%252C_%253BPDuBGZ7-LZgPRM%253A%252CCk-C8gMfA7SJFM%252C_%253Bq77MsC6X6o6iFM%253A%252Cq2HwkEmifDVvZM%252C_%253BVhGY5VytUVPCCM%253A%252C7_92hDa8zd5jGM%252C_%253BKxSmLgz0I_ujNM%253A%252CQWTnJDaXefboIM%252C_&usg=__vRVZ1LTrzl724JBeuTKf4llq6F8%3D&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj71a_4sOTRAhVQ1WMKHfvcDzEQsAQIHw&biw=1024&bih=748&dpr=2)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61vU3VoS7RL._SX522_.jpg)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: tinman13kup on Jan 28, 2017, 05:55 pm
I must admit, I never use a sponge. I have the habit of a quick swipe on my pants and a couple stabs into the copper wool. Elapsed time is maybe 2 seconds, but I have never actually timed it. I just know I can do this without taking my eyes off of the component I'm dealing with.

The pant leg is inevitably blue-jeans (work).
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 29, 2017, 11:26 pm
Electronics parts/equipment is often packaged with foam to prevent shipping damage.
One of these foams has a translucent look and polyethylene texture, not sure of the exact name.
This foam has a low melting temperature and when cut with a hot instrument gives a clean edge.
One use for recycling this foam is for tool shadowing.
In the image below there are two brass tube pieces, some examples of the foam and a hot air wand set at ~450'C.
You can use: double stick tape, one half inch foam and a table saw to create a thicker foam block.
I usually tape the perimeter only so the center cut-outs remove easily.
Place a weight on the foam sandwich for several hours for the tape to become effective.
Heat the brass pipes to 450 degrees C then cut through the top two of three levels of the foam.
Remove the cut-out pieces and insert your tools, bottles, etc.
Note: the larger square bottle will compress the hole it fits, giving a firm grip.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196716)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196718)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196720)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196722)

Here is a link to similar if not the exact same foam:
http://www.newenglandfoam.com/polyethylene.html (http://www.newenglandfoam.com/polyethylene.html)

Heat gluing:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Asc2w3o6fdE (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Asc2w3o6fdE)

Edit:
If you don't have effective double stick tape, try hot glue on the perimeter instead.


.

Edit:
See post 210


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Watcher on Jan 30, 2017, 08:01 am
Perhaps not quite so relevant to this thread, but I was wondering how people are handling the soldering fumes. There are soldering fume extractors in the market, but they tend to be expensive and I am not too conviced with the cheaper ones like this one  (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FA-400-Fume-Extractor-Solder-Smoke-Absorber-Portable-Brand-New-Free-Shipping-/122021516377?hash=item1c690c9459:g:KtgAAOSwzJ5XZiBZ).

Maybe Larry has come up with some clever DIY solution ? :)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 30, 2017, 09:26 am
I have similar to the one you linked.
It's positioned a distance away, feed by dryer venting pipe to help reduce noise.
Dryer vent pipe like that in post 64.
You can buy replacement activated charcoal filters.

I guess one could come up with a water filter design.

Or maybe pass the air through activated charcoal that is used in aquariums.

(http://cdn.spectrumbrands.com/~/media/UPG/Marineland/Products/Filtration%20Media%20and%20Cartridges/Carbon/PA0370MBDPACSm1011jpg84069640x640.ashx?w=300&h=300&bc=white)
.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: pert on Jan 30, 2017, 09:33 am
I wouldn't bother with one of the filter type units. Those filters are going to need replacing regularly to be effective and I'm not convinced they absorb everything. Instead I'd use a ducted fan to pull the fumes from your solder station and blow them outside or work in front of a box fan placed in an open window. The key with exhaust systems is having a properly sized fresh air intake. Your fan will be much less effective if it's trying to pull air in through tiny cracks. You don't need an active intake, only an opening for fresh air to come in that is the same size or larger than the outlet.

I'm fortunate to do my soldering under my glassblowing exhaust hood with a 4200 CFM fan connected, which is quite overboard for this purpose, but I do have a large salvaged muffin fan sitting in front of my PCB vise to pull the fumes away from my face .
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 30, 2017, 09:55 am
This might be something worth trying.
Water air filter.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyEyO4iuz5E (https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyEyO4iuz5E)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: pert on Jan 30, 2017, 10:19 am
If you do want a really nice activated carbon filter check out the ones they sell at hydroponic stores. They take the granulated activated carbon and have a lot of surface area so very effective and long lasting. If you live in an area with a lot of indoor gardeners you can often find old ones for cheap or free. The cost of replacing the carbon is a fair amount of the price of a new filter but you might be able to bake the used carbon to reactivate it. If it's missing the particulate filter on the outside of the can then be sure to replace it because dust will clog up the carbon. You will probably want to use a vacuum cleaner on the filter (even better if assisted with some compressed air) before the first use to clean out the fine carbon powder that breaks off the granules with handling.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: polymorph on Jan 30, 2017, 09:18 pm
I put a 180mm computer fan in an old magnifying fluorescent circleline lamp. Took out the bulb and ballast, used the wires to run 18V into it to run the fan and a bunch of LEDs. Put it right over what I'm soldering, it works.

I hate those little fans that sit on your bench and do nothing.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: dephwyggl on Jan 30, 2017, 09:48 pm
Perhaps not quite so relevant to this thread, but I was wondering how people are handling the soldering fumes. There are soldering fume extractors in the market, but they tend to be expensive and I am not too conviced with the cheaper ones like this one  (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FA-400-Fume-Extractor-Solder-Smoke-Absorber-Portable-Brand-New-Free-Shipping-/122021516377?hash=item1c690c9459:g:KtgAAOSwzJ5XZiBZ).

Maybe Larry has come up with some clever DIY solution ? :)
Looks like a 120mm computer fan in a fancy box which allows easy use of a filter. I always have a bunch of 120mm fans (I don't like to have them fail without having a replacement handy). Attach to 12V wall-wart. Done. :)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: polymorph on Jan 30, 2017, 11:03 pm
Those fans that sit on your desk and suck the soldering smoke away? Worthless. Are you going to solder 1/4 inch from the front of it? Well, I've even tried that and the smoke just rises up into my face.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: polymorph on Jan 30, 2017, 11:09 pm
https://www.dropbox.com/s/ypovhu84vwvz2t3/20170124_111132.jpg?dl=0 (https://www.dropbox.com/s/ypovhu84vwvz2t3/20170124_111132.jpg?dl=0)

https://www.dropbox.com/s/stczjbd5u4wwtq3/20170124_111148.jpg?dl=0 (https://www.dropbox.com/s/stczjbd5u4wwtq3/20170124_111148.jpg?dl=0)

The fan is very quiet. Even run at 18V, it is barely audible when I am next to it.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 31, 2017, 01:28 am
@polymorph
Damn, I had an extra light fixture like that hanging around for >10 years, threw it away.  >:(


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 31, 2017, 01:32 am
A while back, I was using solvent to glue up acrylic boxes.
The trick was to get one drop of Methylene Chloride (causes cancer in California) at the junction of two pieces of plastic to form a right angle.
I came up with a design, to what I refer to as a "Capillary Dropper".
The dropper must serve two functions, #1 dispense only one drop at a time, #2 place that drop at a precise location.
Below are images that describe what is necessary to make one of these droppers.
Note: the larger the diameter of the capillary rod, the more liquid will be dispensed (up to a point).
I find a rod diameter of .026" in a syringe needle with a diameter of .039 works best for one drop at a time application.

Capillary rod diameter:
Straight pin,  .026"
Pin with yellow ball on end,  .026"   <-----<<< best for one drop at a time
Sewing needle,  .035"  <-----<<< best for almost a continual flow at a seam



I will follow up later with "Attaching a PCB inside a plastic case without drilling through the project box itself".

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196860)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196862)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196864)


.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 31, 2017, 08:08 am
Attaching a PCB inside a plastic case without drilling through the project box itself.
Drilling holes in a project box, front panel or bezel usually leaves an amateur look to your work.
There isn't anything wrong with screws they can just be a bit unsightly, especially if there are a lot of them.
Below are images showing how you can mount PCBs, sensors, LCD displays etc. to the inside of a project case or behind a front plastic bezel.
The first thing you need to identify is what solvent you need to go with the type of plastic you are working with.
Methylene Chloride, Acetone, MEK etc. are common solvents used for welding plastics.

Let's say we have a PCB with 2-56 size mounting holes and we want to attach this to the inside surface of a white piece of acrylic plastic.
We need four small 1/8-inch-thick acrylic standoffs/spacers.
We will drill a #47 size hole in each standoff and thread these holes with a common 2-56 screw.
Here we have a strip of 1/4-inch-wide by 1/8-inch-thick acrylic with #47 holes drilled in a line.
Using a slow speed electric screwdriver and a stainless steel 2-56 screw, each hole is threaded.
After threading, a cut is made about half way between each hole.
This leaves us with plastic 2-56 four cornered nuts.
The 4 standoffs are mounted to screws so the standoffs are in line with the PCB holes.
Using a Capillary Dropper, one drop of methylene chloride is added to the side of each plastic nut.
After about 20 seconds the solvent welds the acrylic nut to the acrylic panel.
In about half an hour the assembly is cured.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196891)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196893)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196895)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=196897)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Watcher on Jan 31, 2017, 02:02 pm
Excellent idea Larry! Where do you get the acrylic strip from?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Jan 31, 2017, 04:17 pm
@Jiggy-Ninja
The Hakko soldering iron tips are great.
It is nice to have an assortment of shapes and sizes for different soldering jobs.

As I mentioned in a previous thread, this is my new goto soldering iron tip of choice:
(http://thumbs4.picclick.com/d/l400/pict/271930367687_/5pcs-900M-T-TS-Lead-free-Soldering-Tip-Solder-Iron-Tips.jpg)

Edit
I shouldn't have used goto ???
.

I can't remember if this was brought up in here or in the previous thread, but Hakko has some great references about choosing tips. This page details the uses of the different shapes in the T18 series (https://www.hakko.com/english/tip_selection/series_t18.html) (Weller probably has a similar page, I just don't have one). The bent one you posted is type J.

My vote for the champion of the "unexpectedly useful soldering tip" category doesn't go to the crooked type J, but to the type K Knife tip.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/21%2BCnNIaIPL.jpg)

Yes folks, this is not a cutting attachment, it is a proper soldering tip. Hakko described it's advantages thusly:
Quote
This type has a shape like a knife and is capable of soldering by applying the tip in 3 ways: line, face and point.
It is used for soldering at narrow pitches, correction of bridging and drag soldering.
How to use. (https://www.hakko.com/english/tip_selection/type_k.html)

That first image in there is just awesome; through hole drag soldering. I tried it last night on a 20 pin ZIF socket and it with the ability to start heating the next pin while one is wetting it probably took less than 15 seconds to do each half with the fine solder I was using. If I used my thicker roll it would have probably been a hair faster.

I can't wait to try a TQFP or maybe even a lead-less package with this. I just need to make some progress on the parts of my projects that I'm stuck on.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 31, 2017, 04:53 pm
Yes that tip is very useful.

(https://www.hakko.com/english/tip_selection/img/type_k_08.gif)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 31, 2017, 05:25 pm
Quote
Where do you get the acrylic strip from?
Trotec
https://www.engraving-supplies.ca/ (https://www.engraving-supplies.ca/)


Two methods I use:
Make them out of a 12" by 24" sheet of the material (1/8 inch thickness).

Manually: use a 1/8 inch carbide router bit with a fence positioned at 1/4 inch.
Run the sheet the full length which gives a strip 1/4" X 24"
You can of course move the router fence to get whatever width you need.

Since the bit is 1/8" you lose that amount of material when you make the cut :(

Automatic: I have also used a CAM Tool (CNC) to rout the strips to required width.
During this procedure, a pilot hole is also drilled.
The nuts are "V" scored to 1/16" depth halfway between the pilot holes prior to routing.
Finish the pilot holes on a drill press to the size required for the screws,  2-56, 4-40 or 6-32.
After threading, I complete the "V" scored cut using a table scroll saw with a metal cutting blade, but lately I have just been snapping the threaded nut off the strip.

.


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 04, 2017, 02:06 am
Further to post #104

Note, the screw is being used as the standoff method here.


(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197441)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197443)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 04, 2017, 02:28 am
There are several types of bezels available for mounting single LEDs.

I do not care for the metal version that comes with a nut.

I very much like the mounting hardware in #4 and like the home-made version of #2 and #3.

Below are different methods, I usually use:

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197445)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197447)

.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197449)

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: pert on Feb 04, 2017, 11:01 am
I do not care for the metal version that comes with a nut.
Why not?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TomGeorge on Feb 04, 2017, 11:08 am
I do not care for the metal version that comes with a nut.
Why not?
Like me probably forgets to put the nut and washer on before soldering to the leads.

(http://d2ydh70d4b5xgv.cloudfront.net/images/c/6/5pcs-5mm-convex-type-chrome-copper-metal-led-holder-with-nut-bezel-panel-ecef03f5994c368e6e34726261383b83.jpg)
Tom.... :)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: technogeekca on Feb 04, 2017, 11:59 am
I love this thread, talk about great tips and tricks posted here. I definitely want to see and contribute more to this thread.

I'm going to start off with a real simple one that many of you probably already know and use but here it is anyway.

I always keep my strips of used Solder Wick and have used them for a couple of things.

1- Add solder to get rid of any of the exposed braiding and use it for ground straps.
2- Lay it down on PC Board Traces that don't seem robust enough to handle higher currents and then flood it with solder. It even works great to fix a trace that has actually fried. Done properly it looks good and well no burnt traces.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 04, 2017, 06:48 pm
I have used the silver/chrome  coloured bezels but prefer the black/matte finish of plastic.

(http://uk.farnell.com/productimages/standard/en_GB/42250247.jpg)

I have not tried these yet:
(http://www.taydaelectronics.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/500x500/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/A/-/A-774_4.jpg)


As mentioned these are a good version.

(http://image.made-in-china.com/43f34j00AnYtgSBkAvoE/5mm-Plastic-LED-Bezel-LED-Holder-PLH-5-.jpg)

.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 05, 2017, 02:54 am
Twisting wires can help keep your projects more organized and manageable.
Twisting can cause some signal cross talk between wires, however, for short distances and the frequencies seen in Arduino projects this is usually negligible.
The images below present some ideas you might want to use in your next project.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197548)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197550)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197552)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197554)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 05, 2017, 02:54 am
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197556)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197558)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197560)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197562)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TomGeorge on Feb 05, 2017, 05:21 am
Hi,
I use post #116 to make twisted pairs.

I SET the twist by briefly running the heat-gun up and  down the twist before releasing it.
It relaxes the insulation and helps to get even twist.

Tom... :)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 05, 2017, 05:34 am
I love this thread, talk about great tips and tricks posted here. I definitely want to see and contribute more to this thread.

I'm going to start off with a real simple one that many of you probably already know and use but here it is anyway.

I always keep my strips of used Solder Wick and have used them for a couple of things.

1- Add solder to get rid of any of the exposed braiding and use it for ground straps.
2- Lay it down on PC Board Traces that don't seem robust enough to handle higher currents and then flood it with solder. It even works great to fix a trace that has actually fried. Done properly it looks good and well no burnt traces.
That would increase the current handling of a trace quite nicely.
Regular bus wire works also and surplus solder.

See EEVblog:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=L9q5vwCESEQ (https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=L9q5vwCESEQ)

.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 05, 2017, 05:48 am
Hi,
I use post #116 to make twisted pairs.

I SET the twist by briefly running the heat-gun up and  down the twist before releasing it.
It relaxes the insulation and helps to get even twist.

Tom... :)
Just tried this, works well !  :)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 05, 2017, 08:05 am
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197590)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: technogeekca on Feb 05, 2017, 04:15 pm
That would increase the current handling of a trace quite nicely.
Regular bus wire works also and surplus solder.

Yes you are absolutely correct.

To clarify what I didn't properly state before is that I use it on wider traces and generally wider traces that have been burnt open. This allows me with a bit of prep and cleaning to almost completely cover the burnt section so it's almost invisible.

Thanks again for all your amazing tips.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 05, 2017, 07:43 pm
When you loom your cable harnesses, the point of termination requires some thought.
I prefer to use the loop method as it gives slack to the wires.
If wires need to be re-terminated or moved you have the slack to do so.
The eye is less forgiving when the loop method is used. ;)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197665)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197667)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197669)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197671)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: mjward on Feb 06, 2017, 06:57 pm
Hi,

A lot of great tips here, esp from Larry D--thanks, folks.

Speaking of desoldering braid, I find that the performance of cheap braid can be considerably improved by applying a drop/dab of flux to the braid before use.

--Michael
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 07, 2017, 09:33 pm
Update on two items mentioned:

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198004)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198006)



Quote
Speaking of desoldering braid, I find that the performance of cheap braid can be considerably improved by applying a drop/dab of flux to the braid before use.
Yes good tip.
You could pre-flux the braid with liquid flux, let it dry, then use it as needed.


.(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200031)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 07, 2017, 09:51 pm
The conversion of two third hands into one was mentioned in a previous thread.
Added it here for reference.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198010)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198012)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 07, 2017, 10:08 pm
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198016)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198018)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 08, 2017, 04:42 am
Every now and then you need to stage a PCB so you can:
- work on it with external devices
- power it and test or upload software
- insert PTH components for soldering
By adding high-power magnets to standoffs along with a magnet base you can come up with a flexible assembly to accomplish the above.

The magnet/standoff assembly is positioned on a magnetic base material.
Use 4-40 and 6-32 setscrew/standoffs to accommodate different sized mounting holes.
A PCB with mounting holes is positioned so the setscrews go through the PCB mounting holes.
As can be seen, you can easily go from board to board just by moving the positions of the magnet assemblies.

If the PCB does not have mounting holes, you can make four spring vice units to hold the PCB at the edges.

Adding more standoffs and setscrews can raise the PCB to the required height.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198041)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198043)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198045)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198047)

Badge magnet:
https://www.adafruit.com/products/1170 (https://www.adafruit.com/products/1170)

Magnet mat (you can also use a steel cookie sheet):
https://www.adafruit.com/products/1636 (https://www.adafruit.com/products/1636)

Rare-Earth Magnet, Cup
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=58750&cat=1,42363,42348 (http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=58750&cat=1,42363,42348)

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 08, 2017, 04:42 am
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198051)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198049)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 11, 2017, 03:03 am
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198565)


Edit:
For more strength, you can weld a 1/16 inch acrylic back plate to the combined headers.

.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Feb 11, 2017, 04:06 am
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197590)


.
Instead of just heating after twisting to lock in the curve, you can heat it up to make the insulation more pliable for further twisting. Repeat this a few times to get a really nice twist.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198570)

More tightly twisted wire is more flexible and bends better than a loose spiral.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198572)

And yes, I checked it for continuity. There's no short in that twist.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 12, 2017, 09:05 pm
Yes, it is very interesting (almost magical) twisting and heat locking wires makes the cable . . .

"More tightly twisted wire is more flexible and bends better than a loose spiral."


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 12, 2017, 09:06 pm
The following describes a typical process of making a bezel.
It is very important you measure accurately and test fit before you commit to the final design.
Gluing things with DCM requires a day for things to completely dry.

If you do not have a CNC, you can still use the following to come up with a reasonable product.

http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=219747.0 (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=219747.0)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198819)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198821)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198823)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198825)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 12, 2017, 09:06 pm
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198827)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198829)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198836)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198833)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 12, 2017, 09:46 pm
Which end Mills are you using for the cuts?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 12, 2017, 10:07 pm
Similar to these, usually ~ 15-20 degrees.
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/10-x-20-Degree-0-1mm-Titanium-Coated-1-8-PCB-Engraving-Bits-CNC-Router-Tool-/172033225643?hash=item280dfab3ab:g:gcUAAOSwZVlXkrW9  (http://www.ebay.ca/itm/10-x-20-Degree-0-1mm-Titanium-Coated-1-8-PCB-Engraving-Bits-CNC-Router-Tool-/172033225643?hash=item280dfab3ab:g:gcUAAOSwZVlXkrW9)

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTAwMFgxMDAw/z/gcUAAOSwZVlXkrW9/$_1.JPG)

Careful: They break easily, they are very sharp, they do wear down, need replacing when the milled line is too wide, order lots.

I file the point down a little on new bits using a diamond sharpening honing block.


.





Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 12, 2017, 10:11 pm
I thought they would be more expensive.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 12, 2017, 10:17 pm
On 64mil material (with a new bit), a cutout is 10-20 thou larger, therefore make the opening that much smaller.

i.e.  a 1/2 inch diameter hole would be .52 inches therefore draw it ~ .48 inches if you are OCD ;)

The price locally is ~ $6.00 each and can only get 30 degrees here, so I order from China by the bunch ;)
.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 12, 2017, 10:28 pm
I use a 1/4 inch to 1/8 inch collet for the reduction in the router.
Similar to this:

(http://www.channypicture.com/pic/UploadFile/P1001/POA554827/24C8CD53C79D63C89D48D2239BCB03D2C89AA5469CD29EC6269ED200CFCA9EC6CCCACECBF703561603A01313.jpg)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 12, 2017, 10:29 pm
I understand.  I have been experimenting with it to get a feel for how it moves and responds to the drawing file.  My focus has been narrow out of necessity.  Thanks for the tips.

It is fascinating.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 12, 2017, 10:34 pm
Remember, your cut velocity and tool rotational speed must be matched to the material you are working on.
Too fast you may melt plastics or break a bit.

Once you get things working, write down the settings for that particular environment!


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 12, 2017, 10:34 pm
I have been looking into options for clamping stock to the waste board.  A guy in Ohio is selling 1/2" aluminum bullet with threaded holes 1" OC for $400.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 12, 2017, 10:39 pm
Luckily the sharpie doesn't care too much about feed and speed.  Baby steps.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 12, 2017, 10:43 pm
I use MDF as a sacrificial board.
Next, I level the surface with a 1/4 inch bit.
Paint with clear lacquer, dry thoroughly.
Stick a 1/8 inch sacrificial acrylic panel to the MDF using double stick tape. (replace panel as needed)

Use removable double stick tape to temporarily hold the work while routing to the above acrylic panel.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 12, 2017, 10:48 pm
How do you deal with dust from the mdf?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 12, 2017, 10:54 pm
The 3/4 inch MDF is there for surface stability only.
You should never cut into the MDF therefore there is no dust.

At most, you cut totally through through the work piece and maybe a few thou into the sacrificial acrylic panel below.
 i.e. the MDF is below the sacrificial acrylic panel.

----------------------  <-----<<<< work piece
----------------------  <-----<<<< sacrificial acrylic panel
===============  <-----<<<< 3/4 inch sacrificial MDF panel
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 12, 2017, 10:56 pm
How about heavier parts?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 12, 2017, 11:01 pm
Doesn't the leveling of the mdf make a bunch of dust?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 12, 2017, 11:07 pm
Let's say I was carving 3/4 MDF, then I use a vacuum assembly attached around the cutter.

I use a vacuum cyclone like this to get rid of the dust before it enters the vacuum cleaner.

(http://d2ydh70d4b5xgv.cloudfront.net/images/2/4/cyclone-dust-collector-diy-filter-type-oneida-molded-vacuum-deputy-pre-separator-7316cb9e16afd91632c94f4799be27be.jpg)

Yes levelling the MDF makes a mess, therefore you need the assembly as mentioned.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 12, 2017, 11:41 pm
Why do you need to get rid of the dust before it enters the vacuum cleaner?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 12, 2017, 11:51 pm
Have you cut metals withit?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 13, 2017, 12:42 am
I need to make two small polycarbonate parts from a 0.250" sheet.  Which end mill would you use?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 13, 2017, 01:06 am
The dust is so fine it plugs the vacuum bag very quickly.
If you don't mind replacing bags then you do not need the cyclone.


Since buying the cyclone, I have not had to replace a vacuum bag.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 13, 2017, 01:12 am
I have done some aluminum and diamond dragging on brass and glass.
Mainly cut plastics and wood.


I need to make two small polycarbonate parts from a 0.250" sheet.  Which end mill would you use?
Make sure you take the radius of the bit into consideration. ;)

If you need 90 degree edges, use something like this:

(https://cukii.com/image/cache/catalog/ttool/92124-8pcs-Drill-Bit-Milling-Cutter-End-Mill-Drill-Bits-Cutting-Tool-for-Stainless-Steel-drill-1-4-3-16-5-32-5-16-3-8-1-2-5-8-3-4-inch-1-750x750.jpg)

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 13, 2017, 01:13 am
Thanks Larry.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 13, 2017, 01:14 am
I appreciate the good advice.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 13, 2017, 01:17 am
Are those 4 flute?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 13, 2017, 01:22 am
Are those 4 flute?
Yes but two or three would work too.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 13, 2017, 01:40 am
Quote
Make sure you take the radius of the bit into consideration/quote]

Is this handled in the machine  software with end mill selection and offset?  I don't have to draw the part differently, do I?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 13, 2017, 01:53 am
I do everything with AutoCAD so I have to take cutting bit diameters into consideration in my head/drawing. :(


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: alexmg2 on Feb 14, 2017, 08:39 pm
:o  0201s  :o
Don't sneeze!

Nothing wrong with a tooth pick if it works.
I used a dental pick for a while.

I assume you have a Microscope.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/34/SMT_sizes%2C_based_on_original_by_Zureks.svg/330px-SMT_sizes%2C_based_on_original_by_Zureks.svg.png)

008004  That's just not right  :smiley-small:
(http://www.murata.com/~/media/webrenewal/about/newsroom/news/products/emc/2013/0924/0924_img0001.ashx?h=213&la=en&mw=320&w=320)

......

Very proud of myself lately, soldered 008004 to the board, was not easy but not as hard as I thought it would be :) I would take a picture of it sitting on a fingertip but it is so tiny it is just invisible :) You can probably fit bunch of those into 0201 by volume :)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=199202)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 15, 2017, 02:48 am
Very proud of myself lately, soldered 008004 to the board, was not easy but not as hard as I thought it would be :) I would take a picture of it sitting on a fingertip but it is so tiny it is just invisible :) You can probably fit bunch of those into 0201 by volume :)
I think they are taking this a bit too small.

Good work.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 15, 2017, 02:51 am
You can make awkward to mount components breadboard friendly using: DuPont connectors, some plastic sheeting and some glue.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=199232)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=199238)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=199236)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: tinman13kup on Feb 15, 2017, 04:16 am
Very proud of myself lately, soldered 008004 to the board, was not easy but not as hard as I thought it would be :) I would take a picture of it sitting on a fingertip but it is so tiny it is just invisible :) You can probably fit bunch of those into 0201 by volume :)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=199202)

Impressive, but how many did you lose???
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: alexmg2 on Feb 15, 2017, 03:07 pm
Impressive, but how many did you lose???
I only had two because they cost $.53 each so I was very careful and did not lose any of them but I tell you this, you do need microscope to just get them out of the package and keep an eye on those things at all time they are so tiny that once you look away you may no longer find them on your desk :), and as I was
taking them out of the tape I can clearly feel that one wrong move and springiness of the tape can send them flying so you gotta be very careful and perhaps use two tweezers to take them out.
Soldering will require different technique because dispensing such tiny amount of solder paste manually is very hard and even using needle to dab little blob of solder paste is impossible because pads are so small and even at slowest air speed they just getting blown off pads so you have to tip the pads first and only heat board in a way so that air does not blow those thins off. To me it was like quantum mechanics of surface mounting, at sizes this small laws of physics stop working :)
But in general its very doable task I want to do it more in future to keep concentration in good shape.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=199309)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Feb 15, 2017, 06:22 pm
I had to do some rework replacing 0603 resistors at work a few weeks ago. I affectionately referred to them as "dust".

They're freaking boulders compared to those 008004s!
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: tinman13kup on Feb 15, 2017, 11:47 pm
But in general its very doable task I want to do it more in future to keep concentration in good shape.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=199309)
Looks like you need to get a jig to hold them down on the board too. It looks like the 0603 is good, but the 0402 is a little canted, and the microscopic one is tipped pretty good. Seems to be the break point where I was running into problems keeping them straight and tight too, but I'm only planning on going 0201 as the smallest. I just don't have the dexterity in my fingers anymore. The microscope is in the works, just haven't gotten around to it yet,...work comes first.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 16, 2017, 04:17 am
"Looks like you need to get a jig to hold them down on the board too."

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=199392)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 16, 2017, 04:22 am
I just ordered a bunch of end mills.  Thanks LarryD! 
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 16, 2017, 04:27 am
I just ordered a bunch of end mills.  Thanks LarryD!
You are welcome.
The more you do with the tool, the more you will discover you can do with it.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TKall on Feb 16, 2017, 04:40 am
Time to buy some color core sheets too.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Watcher on Feb 16, 2017, 07:02 am
Quote
They're freaking boulders compared to those 008004s!
... and I thought 0805's are small!

Cant imagine how can you even grab an 008004 out of its tape, let alone solder it!
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: tinman13kup on Feb 16, 2017, 01:53 pm
"Looks like you need to get a jig to hold them down on the board too."

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=199392)
Larry, that looks like a solution until you add scale, which is conveniently there. That little holder looks to be about a 0805 size. That could be fun to make.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: alexmg2 on Feb 16, 2017, 03:52 pm
Looks like you need to get a jig to hold them down on the board too. It looks like the 0603 is good, but the 0402 is a little canted, and the microscopic one is tipped pretty good. Seems to be the break point where I was running into problems keeping them straight and tight too, but I'm only planning on going 0201 as the smallest. I just don't have the dexterity in my fingers anymore. The microscope is in the works, just haven't gotten around to it yet,...work comes first.
Just need to increase size of pads so that I can put more solder and surface tension will do better job, apparently it takes some effort from PCB fab house too, in orded for this 008004 to work better I will have to reduce the gap between pads to about 3mils, currently it is about 6 mil so 008001 part is not laying flat and one end of it always falls into the gap, sending new board design with pads a bit closet together and larger, that should work, same for 01005, will be fun project again, I may throw 1206 cap in there too and line them up so it will make nice visual reference from 1206 down to 008004.
How do they even deposit solder paste to such small pads in real production world?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 16, 2017, 06:53 pm
Prior to using 1/8" material for blind attaching parts to a panel, I used two 1/16" pieces of plastic.
This is still a very viable and strong way of attaching things to a surface without drill a hole through it.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=199507)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Feb 17, 2017, 04:34 am
Let's say I was carving 3/4 MDF, then I use a vacuum assembly attached around the cutter.

I use a vacuum cyclone like this to get rid of the dust before it enters the vacuum cleaner.

(http://d2ydh70d4b5xgv.cloudfront.net/images/2/4/cyclone-dust-collector-diy-filter-type-oneida-molded-vacuum-deputy-pre-separator-7316cb9e16afd91632c94f4799be27be.jpg)

Yes levelling the MDF makes a mess, therefore you need the assembly as mentioned.


.

That is the missing bit from my interossitor!
Do you yave a spare ?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 17, 2017, 07:42 am
Say what?

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-bxnnNu6avNk/TXl7QRFRZeI/AAAAAAAAAVI/LKO5pUyBeF4/s1600/Interocitor3.jpg)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Feb 17, 2017, 01:58 pm
How do they even deposit solder paste to such small pads in real production world?
They use laser cut stencils.
For rework of small stuff i use SMT glue and a small dispensing needle to pick up and position, cook it to set and it makes soldering easier/possible for me.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Feb 19, 2017, 05:21 am
12 pages and hot glue hasn't been featured once yet? I'm shocked.

Instant rubber feet. Sticks better than the garbage adhesive you find on actual rubber feet.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=199911)

Pulling triple duty here. Not only a giant rubber foot, but also protecting the fine wire on the bottom of this protoboard and insulating the exposed pins of the TH components.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=199913)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 19, 2017, 06:57 am
I have put 4 dabs of clear silicone glue at the bottom corners of a box.
Place four 1/4" nuts on top of wax paper used as spacers (not where the silicone will touch).
Invert the box on top of the nut spacers and waxed paper.
The weight of the box compresses the glue evenly to the height of the nut spacers.
Let dry.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 19, 2017, 07:58 pm
Keep your often used breadboard parts organized use stacking screw jars.
Go vertical ;)

I think they also sell these at fishing stores for hook storage.

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=64690&cat=1,43325,43326,64690 (http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=64690&cat=1,43325,43326,64690)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200057)


(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200063)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Feb 19, 2017, 09:41 pm
I have put 4 dabs of clear silicone glue at the bottom corners of a box.
Place four 1/4" nuts on top of wax paper used as spacers (not where the silicone will touch).
Invert the box on top of the nut spacers and waxed paper.
The weight of the box compresses the glue evenly to the height of the nut spacers.
Let dry.


.
Talking about something like this?: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Liquid-Nails-2-5-oz-Clear-Small-Projects-Silicone-Adhesive-LN-207/202203979 (http://www.homedepot.com/p/Liquid-Nails-2-5-oz-Clear-Small-Projects-Silicone-Adhesive-LN-207/202203979)

I have a laptop that's missing a footpad or two, sounds like a better way to replace them than hot melt.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 19, 2017, 09:44 pm
Talking about something like this?: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Liquid-Nails-2-5-oz-Clear-Small-Projects-Silicone-Adhesive-LN-207/202203979 (http://www.homedepot.com/p/Liquid-Nails-2-5-oz-Clear-Small-Projects-Silicone-Adhesive-LN-207/202203979)

I have a laptop that's missing a footpad or two, sounds like a better way to replace them than hot melt.
Similar product.
(http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/1000/3e/3e7ffc2a-f5af-44b4-b5bf-3c66c93efda0_1000.jpg)

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 20, 2017, 05:14 am
When you need a USB 'A' connector added to a panel/bezel, you can use inexpensive PC connectors.
These usually are sold two on a metal frame slot for about $3.00
http://www.avadirect.com/Dual-USB-Ports-PC-Case-Slot-Bracket-10-pin-Connector-7-Inch-White/Product/6650215 (http://www.avadirect.com/Dual-USB-Ports-PC-Case-Slot-Bracket-10-pin-Connector-7-Inch-White/Product/6650215)

(http://avadirect-freedomusainc1.netdna-ssl.com/Pictures/500/6650215_2.jpg)

Cut off the plastic housing equal to the thickness of the panel.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200105)


I am now using a homemade version of the above.
It uses a USB 'A' female cable connector which is glued/stabilized to the panel.

USB female ~18 cents each:
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/10Pcs-USB2-0-Type-A-Plug-4-pin-female-Adapter-Connector-jack-Black-Plastic-Cover-/400804253915?hash=item5d51cb90db:g:j98AAOSwcF9UYHmb (http://www.ebay.ca/itm/10Pcs-USB2-0-Type-A-Plug-4-pin-female-Adapter-Connector-jack-Black-Plastic-Cover-/400804253915?hash=item5d51cb90db:g:j98AAOSwcF9UYHmb)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200107)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200109)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200111)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 21, 2017, 01:49 am
Sooner or later you will need to make a rectangular hole for an LCD or other component in one of your projects.
A CNC machine takes about 8 seconds to do this.

If you don't have access to a CNC machine, you can make reasonable rectangular holes by hand.
Tools you will need:

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200259)

Auger bit file:
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?cat=1,320,43072,43089&p=70693 (http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?cat=1,320,43072,43089&p=70693)

The key to doing a good job is to use four jointed hardwood guides.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200261)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200263)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200265)



.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 21, 2017, 01:49 am
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200267)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200269)

After drilling holes in the material, work from the back of the material.
You may want to apply masking tape to the exposed front surface to protect it from scratching.


(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200271)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200273)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 21, 2017, 01:49 am
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200275)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200277)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200279)

Edit:
Also see post 199


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 21, 2017, 03:37 am
Note: if you have a flush cut bit and router, you can avoid all but the corner filing at the last image in post 185.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ChrisTenone on Feb 21, 2017, 06:45 am
This is my favorite thread here Larry!

A white pencil from any colored pencil set marks programmable chips so you can tell which one is which. Skip the letters that look too much like numbers (I, L, S, U, etc.):

(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/x1eiapfgg3zn0rr/tiny85label.jpg)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 21, 2017, 07:24 am
Thanks Chris.
Got to get more GrayHairedOldPixxers to contribute.



At first glace these are a bit clunky, but if your hands shake . . .

Quote
I like these because they give you somewhere to brace your hand for those difficult to get to parts.
http://www.eevblog.com/forum/beginners/better-than-%28un%29helpful-hands/ (http://www.eevblog.com/forum/beginners/better-than-%28un%29helpful-hands/)

(http://i237.photobucket.com/albums/ff237/tr8rjohnk/20120522_123745.jpg)

.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Coding Badly on Feb 21, 2017, 08:10 am
If you don't have access to a CNC machine, you can make reasonable rectangular holes by hand.
Tools you will need:
Let me introduce you to Nibbler...

(http://www.cartoonswallpapers.net/wallpapers/lord-nibbler-futurama-cartoon-hd-background-lumia.jpg)


Wait.  Not that Nibbler.  This nibbler...
https://www.google.com/search?q=nibbler+hand+tool (https://www.google.com/search?q=nibbler+hand+tool)

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Coding Badly on Feb 21, 2017, 08:13 am
A white pencil from any colored pencil set marks programmable chips so you can tell which one is which.
Some cheap finger nail polish also works for marking chips.  (Some does not adhere.)

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Feb 21, 2017, 12:52 pm
Note: if you have a flush cut bit and router, you can avoid all but the corner filing at the last image in post 185.


.
If you have one of these
https://www.transtools.co.uk/accessories/router-cutters/base-plates-and-guide-bushes/silverline-guide-bush-set-10-piece (https://www.transtools.co.uk/accessories/router-cutters/base-plates-and-guide-bushes/silverline-guide-bush-set-10-piece)

and use the smallest one it makes the corner radius much smaller and easier to file.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 21, 2017, 04:46 pm
Let me introduce you to Nibbler...

Wait.  Not that Nibbler.  This nibbler...
https://www.google.com/search?q=nibbler+hand+tool (https://www.google.com/search?q=nibbler+hand+tool)
Yes, the nibbler is great for this kind of stuff too.
I use mine mainly for holes in aluminum and FR4 material.
It's getting old but still works well.
I took off the top screw and spring for more accessibility.

(http://www.dansdata.com/images/tools/nibbler500.jpg)


For plastics, I stick with the above method CNC ;)

=====================================

You can also label your I.C.s with 'Post-it 658' tape, cut to size.
It is: self adhesive, writable and easily removable (same glue as on Posit-Notes).

Here (http://www.staples.ca/en/Post-it-Correction-And-Cover-Up-Tape-1-inch-Six-Line/product_11166_2-CA_1_20001?kpid=11166&cid=PS:SBD:GS:n:n:SBD:58:21800&prof=58&camp=46886&affcode=pg256537&kct=google&kchid=5118821699&cid=85571401816&networkType=search&kdv=c&kpid=11166&kmc=10327878&criteriaid=aud-68327388016:pla-74361958336&adgroupid=22894334656&campaignid=434947696&locphy=9001314&adpos=1o2&url=http://clickserve.dartsearch.net/link/click?lid=92700011701751616&gclid=CKjOuNy9odICFQ8uaQodUKcFIg)


(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200337)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 21, 2017, 05:00 pm
If you have one of these
https://www.transtools.co.uk/accessories/router-cutters/base-plates-and-guide-bushes/silverline-guide-bush-set-10-piece (https://www.transtools.co.uk/accessories/router-cutters/base-plates-and-guide-bushes/silverline-guide-bush-set-10-piece)

and use the smallest one it makes the corner radius much smaller and easier to file.
(https://www.transtools.co.uk/image/cache/data/woodworking/SIL245122-255x255.jpg)

I have one of those sets, but I have never used it  :smiley-confuse:

I was thinking of something like this, no filing except in the corners:

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200349)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 21, 2017, 05:20 pm
These were shown on other threads, posted here for reference.
Print the attached PDFs on gum labels and stick to surface.

UNO:
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200355)


Bobuino:
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200357)



.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Feb 21, 2017, 06:25 pm
ghf(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200382)


Using a template with different collars allows the same template to be multipurpose.

That particular one can do 2 sizes of LED display and ventillation holes
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Feb 21, 2017, 07:09 pm
What is the material you are using Larry.

It appears to be laminate mounted on some type of wood.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 21, 2017, 09:21 pm
It is laminate flooring. (I wouldn't use it on the floor though)

The core is hardboard.
They are 4 feet by 8 inches @ 1/4" thick, tongue & groove.
I think there are 12 pieces in a box.
Both the top and bottom have a hard coating that double stick (double sided) tape adheres to as if it were put on glass.

I bought a box just to make templates.
After they are put through a jointer, cut them into one inch 4 foot long strips (mark the jointed edge).
Use the strips as outlines for openings or to make templates like you showed.
It takes and keeps a great edge.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200411)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 21, 2017, 09:24 pm
Further to post 186.

If the edges need to be fine tuned use a less aggressive glass finger nail file to do so.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200413)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: CrossRoads on Feb 21, 2017, 09:29 pm
Chris?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 21, 2017, 09:32 pm
(http://dcw9y8se13llu.cloudfront.net/avatars/ChrisTenone.jpg)

I think he lives in Phoenix AZ.

OMG  :o


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on Feb 21, 2017, 09:52 pm
META-Tips:  Hey Larry, What are you using to do your illustrations?? 
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 21, 2017, 10:22 pm
META-Tips:  Hey Larry, What are you using to do your illustrations?? 
I am using 'Snagit' by TechSmith.

https://www.techsmith.com/screen-capture.html (https://www.techsmith.com/screen-capture.html)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 21, 2017, 10:46 pm
Quick modification to the SMD third hand.

You can make the business end adjustable using syringe needles.

A sharp will get you as small as you need to go.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200438)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200440)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Watcher on Feb 22, 2017, 07:32 am
Anyone got any tips on best practices to mount an LCD on a panel?

I wouldn't like for example to have the LCD mounting screws showing on the front panel so I am thinking of using a piece pf plexiglass to mount the LCD right behind the panel but then you have to figure out how to deal with the opening on the front panel for the LCD to be visible. It would be nice to cut an opening on the front panel in the shape of the LCD and replace it with a piece of transparent plexiglass so that the LCD shows from behind. But, with out a CNC machine, getting everything to the exact shape is a nightmare. I am afraid the final result would't be that good.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 22, 2017, 07:41 am
Anyone got any tips on best practices to mount an LCD on a panel?

I wouldn't like for example to have the LCD mounting screws showing on the front panel so I am thinking of using a piece pf plexiglass to mount the LCD right behind the panel but then you have to figure out how to deal with the opening on the front panel for the LCD to be visible. It would be nice to cut an opening on the front panel in the shape of the LCD and replace it with a piece of transparent plexiglass so that the LCD shows from behind. But, with out a CNC machine, getting everything to the exact shape is a nightmare. I am afraid the final result would't be that good.
Did you get any ideas from these posts 184, 104, 103, 109 and 132.


Edit:
Quote
It would be nice to cut an opening on the front panel in the shape of the LCD and replace it with a piece of transparent plexiglass so that the LCD shows from behind.
I used clear acrylic in post 133

Quote
getting everything to the exact shape is a nightmare.
I show how this is done without CNC in post 184

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ChrisTenone on Feb 22, 2017, 09:17 am
(http://dcw9y8se13llu.cloudfront.net/avatars/ChrisTenone.jpg)

I think he lives in Phoenix AZ.

OMG  :o


.
Scorpion city!
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Feb 22, 2017, 01:43 pm
Anyone got any tips on best practices to mount an LCD on a panel?

I use a template to cut the hole as above and use a bezel to mount.
They are often offered as an optional extra with LED displays.


Not so common with LCD.http://www.hobbytronics.co.uk/lcd-bezel-16x2 (http://www.hobbytronics.co.uk/lcd-bezel-16x2)

Like they say they can be difficult to find.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Feb 22, 2017, 01:58 pm
Sometimes you have to make your own bezel out of thin plastic as bezel mounts do not like thick mounting panels, have a look at larry's ideas above.

For some plastic it is easy to cut by scoring and snapping.

Dressing the edges can be tedious though.
I prefer flame polishing which is quick but takes practice.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 22, 2017, 07:48 pm
Updates on two posts:


(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200612)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200561)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Feb 22, 2017, 09:39 pm
How did you make the PDFs you used in the other threads? Rather than having it all scattered across a dozen and a half pages I think a single PDF or something in the front post that's kept up to date would be good. I'd be willing to make it if you point me the right way. One ring to rule them all reference for these obscure but useful tips would be great.

I've taken about as much as I've contributed here, so I love this thread. I don't want to lose anything in here.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 22, 2017, 10:46 pm
I used MicrosoftWord/export to PDF, but I do have Adobe Acrobat Pro.

At some point, I might get things in PDF form, however they are usually too large to post in one file here.
Maybe can find a host site like Terry's.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on Feb 22, 2017, 11:16 pm
Quote
Maybe can find a host site like Terry's.
I'd be real happy to host it; I'm way behind on putting Larry's / Others material on ArduinoInfo.Info

Just email me...
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 22, 2017, 11:51 pm
Got about 7 more things to still cover, see you then.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 23, 2017, 08:12 pm
Modify RJ45 plugs so you can more easily terminate a cable with them.

When drilling the connector, let the drill do the work (do not force the process).

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200747)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200749)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200751)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 23, 2017, 08:12 pm
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200753).

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200755)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200757)

Make a coffee and process all you connectors ;)
.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on Feb 23, 2017, 09:29 pm
Nice idea!
Now to find cable with strong colors, not mostly faded into white..  >:(
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 24, 2017, 04:07 am
Next time you purchase some parts, get one of each battery holder so you will be prepared when the time comes to do testing.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200806)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Feb 24, 2017, 05:12 am
Do you really need the ST-M to Dupont-F converter? If the connectors you're using aren't 0.1" spacing, you could change to these red ones that have good retention force and will mate well with male headers.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200809)

But either way, big yes to crimp connectors. I just got some recently (like the day before I posted the cable twist photo) and they're also great for regulator modules, motors, and other things like that that won't be plugged into a breadboard.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 24, 2017, 05:40 am
"Do you really need the ST-M to Dupont-F converter?"
The black ST connectors I show are the same as your red ones.
For easy breadboard connection, DuPont is the answer, so I made the converter.

You could just use battery to DuPont female.
Or, maybe Red to female and Black to male, therefore polarity would be observed.

I am in the habit of using ST connectors like those shown and yours with power supplies as they maintain polarity.

I am sold on crimp connectors too.

Never solder crimps as you have no give at the connector.
The wire will break at this spot. 
The name is crimp connector ;)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Feb 24, 2017, 07:05 am
ST male to Dupont male I would understand, I just don't know why you went with Dupont female.

You could also just cut the plastic shroud off the male ST connector before putting the pins in to get something breadboardable.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 24, 2017, 04:39 pm
ST male to Dupont male I would understand, I just don't know why you went with Dupont female.

You could also just cut the plastic shroud off the male ST connector before putting the pins in to get something breadboardable.
I went to a DuPont female to prevent accidental shorting of battery leads when the battery wire is dangling in the air.
By using the male to male header pins plugged into the breadboard, you can easily plug the female DuPont onto them to make your connection.

Cutting the shroud off does expose the ST male pins, but these are really too large to be used with a breadboard.
Better stick to header pins which are .025" square.


.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 24, 2017, 04:57 pm
OK, I am a bit slow, but eventually I learn.
It can be a bit difficult to pick up solder from the work bench.
Rolling a bent piece can make it easier.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200879)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200881)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Feb 24, 2017, 05:35 pm
Next tip, how to tie up those strings dangling from your shoes so you can stop tripping over them. :D

Take it away, Gary! (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ia8U-Yb-tkI)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: RMurphy195 on Feb 24, 2017, 06:48 pm
How did you make the PDFs you used in the other threads? Rather than having it all scattered across a dozen and a half pages I think a single PDF or something in the front post that's kept up to date would be good. I'd be willing to make it if you point me the right way. One ring to rule them all reference for these obscure but useful tips would be great.

I've taken about as much as I've contributed here, so I love this thread. I don't want to lose anything in here.
These days for Word documents I simply save as PDF (since I had Word 2010)

Prior to this I used (and sometimes still do) PDF995 - you install this and then you get a sort of virtual printer which you can select from any application via its print button - instead of selecting, say "Epson SX130" or whatever printer you have, you select PDF995 from the printer drop-down list. PDF995 then asks for the usial info to save the document ie where you want it, what to call it etc. http://www.pdf995.com

There are of course other, similar products on the market.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Feb 24, 2017, 09:12 pm
I went to a DuPont female to prevent accidental shorting of battery leads when the battery wire is dangling in the air.
By using the male to male header pins plugged into the breadboard, you can easily plug the female DuPont onto them to make your connection.

Cutting the shroud off does expose the ST male pins, but these are really too large to be used with a breadboard.
Better stick to header pins which are .025" square.


.


That still doesn't answer why you needed to convert ST female to Dupont female. Don't the headers fit into the ST female plug?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Coding Badly on Feb 24, 2017, 09:36 pm
url=http://watch
Did you mean to post a link to a local domain name?

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Feb 24, 2017, 09:58 pm
Oops, fixed it.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 24, 2017, 10:06 pm
That still doesn't answer why you needed to convert ST female to Dupont female. Don't the headers fit into the ST female plug?
No, they are not designed to do that.
The ST male pin is flatter and wider than the DuPont male pin.

A header pin would flatten the ST female inside spring, as a result, I have the ST-M to DuPont-F interface.

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 24, 2017, 10:31 pm
If you have a SMD rework station like this or a Hakko FX888D, buy extra soldering irons so you don't have to replace tip size. Just plug in a different iron.
~$13
An added benefit is you will have spare elements.
For 927 852D
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/50W-24V-Soldering-Iron-Handle-for-4mm-900M-T-tip-Soldering-station-936-852-907A-/321249916263?hash=item4acbfcb567:g:TIgAAOxyRNJShKCf (http://www.ebay.ca/itm/50W-24V-Soldering-Iron-Handle-for-4mm-900M-T-tip-Soldering-station-936-852-907A-/321249916263?hash=item4acbfcb567:g:TIgAAOxyRNJShKCf)

For FX888D
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/322120103473 (http://www.ebay.ca/itm/322120103473)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200931)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200929)
.



Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ChrisTenone on Feb 25, 2017, 06:49 am
Next tip, how to tie up those strings dangling from your shoes so you can stop tripping over them. :D

Take it away, Gary! (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ia8U-Yb-tkI)
I don't think Bob's doing it right!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zAFcV7zuUDA (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zAFcV7zuUDA)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: technogeekca on Feb 25, 2017, 01:19 pm
Modify RJ45 plugs so you can more easily terminate a cable with them.

When drilling the connector, let the drill do the work (do not force the process).

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200751)

.
I hate to burst anyone's bubble since this is by far the best thread on this Forum but I have been using what they call "Easy on Ethernet Connectors" that are exactly like this for at least 5 years. The crimper tool that I purchased already has a blade in it to flush cut the ends and it was only five bucks more than a standard crimper. Works for both RJ-45 as well 4 and 6 Pin RJ-11 Connectors. I believe that Paladin makes a lower cost tool for those who don't do millions of these ends.

With the amount of connectors I put on some days drilling and heat polishing them would kill me.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on Feb 25, 2017, 01:28 pm
Quote
I have been using what they call "Easy on Ethernet Connectors" that are exactly like this for at least 5 years. The crimper tool that I purchased already has a blade in it to flush cut the ends and it was only five bucks more than a standard crimper.
Please! A source?? Thanks!

** OK I'll do some looking. Thanks..
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: technogeekca on Feb 25, 2017, 01:55 pm
I live in what most of you would call a small city in Winnipeg, Canada and most of the dealers sell these. Also any dealer that sells them has the crimpers. Yes up here in Igloo's and living with the Polar Bear. Try Digikey or Mouser but if you can buy wholesale ADI has them as well.

Here's a link to the ADI Website.

https://adiglobal.us/Pages/default.aspx

Here's a link to a tool on Amazon and Platinum also sell the connectors.

https://www.amazon.com/Platinum-Tools-100054C-Clamshell-EZ-RJPRO/dp/B00939KFOU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1488028030&sr=8-1&keywords=Platinum+Tools+100054C+Clamshell+EZ-RJPRO+HD

You should be able to buy them anywhere. Just do a google search for "easy ethernet connector" and click on the images tab.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 25, 2017, 06:26 pm
I hate to burst anyone's bubble since this is by far the best thread on this Forum but I have been using what they call "Easy on Ethernet Connectors" that are exactly like this for at least 5 years. The crimper tool that I purchased already has a blade in it to flush cut the ends and it was only five bucks more than a standard crimper. Works for both RJ-45 as well 4 and 6 Pin RJ-11 Connectors. I believe that Paladin makes a lower cost tool for those who don't do millions of these ends.

With the amount of connectors I put on some days drilling and heat polishing them would kill me.
No bubble to burst here.

Yes, they have been available for some years now.

This just discuses how to turn your current connectors into the same, about 2 minutes each.

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ElCaron on Feb 25, 2017, 11:54 pm
Have custom perfboards made - i.e. part prototyping perfboard, part recurring (SMD) circuit.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201068)
This board is 5x10cm^2 and has custom pads for a Wemos D1 Mini + power circuitry to power it with up to 28V.
SMD pads are for an LDO+caps, with jumpers to either power the 5V or the 3.3V pin of the D1 Mini and 5V/3.3V/GND access on both sides.
Above the LDO circuit, an MP1584 module can be placed (which does not fit the usual grid well).
Above the MP1584 goes the D1 Mini, so all this does not increase the footprint of the D1 Mini at all.
I mostly use it for 12V LED dimmer stuff.

With current PCB service prices from China, one board costs 25ct. (v-cut 10x10cm^2 board, not counting shipping). Thats not even a bad price for a normal plated-through perfboard, and there, the functionality would probably have thrice the footprint (at least with through-hole components).
Hope they don't hate me for all the drilling ;)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ballscrewbob on Feb 26, 2017, 12:16 am
Not sure if these have been done but here goes...

I often buy wall PSU's from the thrift shop and sometimes I get a DOA but the lead is often fine.
Problem with most of them is that both wires are the same colour.

Problem solved with a small amount of heatshrink place far enough up in case I have to re-work the ends.
(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201070)

Not everyone can afford the good third hand devices and some of us get these.
Whilst useful they do have a couple of minor drawbacks.
First is that they do tend to tip over on occasion.
Second is that many don't allow you to move the claws close together.

solved with a small piece of plywood and a couple of screws as far as tipping.
(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201072)

Drilled and CS a couple of extra holes for the screws

Also extended one claw with some redundant threaded rod.

You could use almost anything to do the mods but its what I had close to hand
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ballscrewbob on Feb 26, 2017, 12:21 am
Continued from above

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201074)

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201076)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 26, 2017, 01:59 am
It can be fun to create an all in one assembly work surface.
The 'Bread Board' work surface described here has many pluses.
• is inexpensive, about $15 for the base.
• stays where it is placed as it has a reasonable weight ~6lbs.
• relocatable to another location.
• you can turn to any of the four sides for the viewpoint required.
• can be cut to size.
• is easily tapped for screws.
• can have bulldog clamps mounted at different angles.
• FR4 PCB material can be mounted so you can solder sections to it as shown in post 15.
• stainless steel 304 material can be mounted to have a sturdy magnetic surface.
• can have magnetic cups mounted within (use rare earth ring magnets for removability).
• standoffs with set screws can be mounted to securely hold items.
• angle brackets/motors/bezels/panels/LCDs/switches . . . can be easily mounted.
• mount SK10 breadboards.
• absorbs hammering.
• drillable with forstner bits to large diameters: hold bottles and make component/debris wells.
• easily routed and filed.
• add magnets at strategic locations to hold an existing third hand assembly.
• slotted to hold work in an upright position.
• accepts double stick (double sided) tape.
• can be inverted to expose the underside which has be modified for specific tasks.
• can be moved to the edge of the bench for components to hang down.
• mount a second story of the same material such as 2" X 2" to get more height for components.
• second story can be turned to allow an external clamp to be used.
• the 1 inch thickness allows you to drill in from the side to store items. (dowelling, hardware etc.)
• glue will not adhere to the surface which allows you to glue other items together.
• could be hot welded.
• won't scratch surfaces.
• inexpensive to replace when surfaces have deteriorated.

Other suggestions welcomed.

Problems with the material:
- may have hidden voids in the center
- the middle is concave about 1/16" (to hold meat juices)
- melts easily

I am sure available sizes vary.
The ones I have been using are 11.75" square at .94" thick.
The material is high density polyethylene and weighs 6 pounds.
These can be found at kitchen supply stores, I get mine at 'Superstore'.
This takes the 'Bread Board' to a whole new height.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201082)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201084)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201086)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Feb 26, 2017, 02:27 am
You didn't mention what the material is.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 26, 2017, 02:31 am
You didn't mention what the material is.
Third last line.

"The material is high density polyethylene and weighs 6 pounds."

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 26, 2017, 02:34 am
Suggest you use ring magnets as mentioned.
This way you can still remove them when placed in a cup.

Ring magnets:
(http://www.leevalley.com/en/images/item/woodworking/magnets/99k3601s1.jpg)

Cups:
(http://www.leevalley.com/en/images/item/woodworking/magnets/99k3330s2.jpg)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 26, 2017, 04:11 am
Continued from above

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201074)

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201076)
You could add a ceramic floor tile to the top of the wood.

(https://www.bobvila.com/system/images/BAhbBlsHOgZmIn0yMDEyLzExLzEwLzIyLzQ2LzExLzM1NS9qYWNrc29udmlsbGVfdGlsZV9pbnN0YWxsYXRpb25fdGlsZV9yZXBhaXJfdGlsZV9mbG9vcnNfd29vZF9mbG9vcnNfbmFzc2F1X2NvdW50eV9vcmFuZ2VfcGFyay5qcGc/jacksonville-tile-installation-tile-repair-tile-floors-wood-floors-nassau-county-orange-park.jpg)

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ballscrewbob on Feb 26, 2017, 05:21 am
Thanks Larry

I have some large tile shower work coming up so great tip.
The extra weight will be useful too.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Feb 26, 2017, 06:11 am
Third last line.

"The material is high density polyethylene and weighs 6 pounds."

.
That kind of info needs to be one of the first lines, not one of the last. My eyes were jumping all over the place just to find out what the thing was.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Feb 26, 2017, 09:29 pm
Have I done enough to proclaim my love for the Type K knife tip? No I haven't because each time I use this thing for something new I fall harder in love.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201218)
I <3 the knife type

The first time I soldered a SOT23-3 transistor to a PCB I used a chisel tip (Hakko type D) and it SUCKED. The solder's surface tension kept pulling it up. Even when I got it acceptably stuck down it was still off kilter and just really bad. The experience was so frustrating compared to doing SOIC or even MSOP that I dreaded trying again.

Until now. Just last night and this morning I soldered 20 SOT23-3 transistors onto breakout boards, and it was a breeze. The broad, flat surface of the knife side is excellent for holding a good blob of solder. Then you can flux up the board, heat both of the pins on the one side until it's in a good position, then a quite swipe with the edge finishes up the last pin.

The edge is also broad enough to bridge 3 header pins at once. Flux the pins, feed solder onto the broad side, and slowly pull it down the line of headers to solder rows of headers with ridiculous efficiency. Just keep feeding the blob because it runs out quickly.

I still haven't tried the bent type J that Larry's suggested (I'm in the middle of rearranging/tidying up and I've lost track of where I put them), but the only advantage it appears to have is angling into an awkward space. I'm sure it'll have a place next to my iron to be swapped out when needed (next to a couple sizes of chisel tips), but I can't imagine it dethroning the knife as my default tip of choice. This thing is just that awesome.

I'll repeat what I said the first time: This is not a cutting attachment, this is a bad ass soldering tip.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Qdeathstar on Feb 26, 2017, 09:40 pm
I live in what most of you would call a small city in Winnipeg, Canada and most of the dealers sell these. Also any dealer that sells them has the crimpers. Yes up here in Igloo's and living with the Polar Bear. Try Digikey or Mouser but if you can buy wholesale ADI has them as well.

Here's a link to the ADI Website.

https://adiglobal.us/Pages/default.aspx

Here's a link to a tool on Amazon and Platinum also sell the connectors.

https://www.amazon.com/Platinum-Tools-100054C-Clamshell-EZ-RJPRO/dp/B00939KFOU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1488028030&sr=8-1&keywords=Platinum+Tools+100054C+Clamshell+EZ-RJPRO+HD

You should be able to buy them anywhere. Just do a google search for "easy ethernet connector" and click on the images tab.
Personally i like to the two peice connectors. You stick all the little wires through a small peice of plastic, slide the small piece all the way down to the outer insulation jacket, then cut off the excess wire and push it into an outer housing and use a crimper to crimp it. No clamshell required.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 26, 2017, 11:46 pm
Cut the finger off an old glove.
Put a rare earth magnet in tip to help in those awkward situations.

(http://www.windingroad.com/assets/autos_db/thumbnails/magnetic-finger_jpg_677x1000_q100.jpg)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TomGeorge on Feb 27, 2017, 02:35 am
Cut the finger off an old glove.
Put a rare earth magnet in tip to help in those awkward situations.

Brilliant.... :)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 27, 2017, 03:18 am
The following describes how to make a 'Screw vise'.
These are very effective in holding flat objects like PCB material.

The gap washer can be changed out to accommodate different thicknesses of boards.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201274)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201272)


Edit:
You can of course use one of these instead of making the above.

Obviously, a screw works, but you then have to reach for a screw driver ;)

(http://media.rs-online.com/t_large/F0606686-01.jpg)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 27, 2017, 04:36 am
Inexpensive bull dog clips are great for holding components while soldering.
Place the clips on top of a rare earth magnets to secure them.

It is easy to rotate the clips on the magnets to get a different view point.

Many different sizes to clamp your components.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201253)

.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ChrisTenone on Feb 27, 2017, 08:28 am
I never knew what those are called!
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TomGeorge on Feb 27, 2017, 08:39 am
LarryD, how many of these magnet do you have.
Are you another of the earths magnetic poles?

Tom... :)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Feb 27, 2017, 01:40 pm
I have one living next door.
She certainly is magnetic  :)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 27, 2017, 02:10 pm
LarryD, how many of these magnet do you have.
Are you another of the earths magnetic poles?

Tom... :)
We live just a few miles south of the N pole, they make these magnets here.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 27, 2017, 02:15 pm
Make yourself a tool tree.
The key is to accurately drill ~1/2 down the standoff with a 1/8" brad bit.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201278)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201280)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201344)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201290)

In the last image, the drill bit should be a brad point bit.
Too cold in the garage to take a picture of it.

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 27, 2017, 02:21 pm
Also, make a hardware cup to store nuts etc. maybe wine ;) .

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201288)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: CrossRoads on Feb 27, 2017, 03:36 pm
Tooltree is neat.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Feb 27, 2017, 04:26 pm
Also, make a hardware cup to store nuts etc. maybe wine ;) .

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201288)

.

What advantage does this have over magnetic parts trays? This seems unnecessarily top heavy.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on Feb 27, 2017, 04:33 pm
Larry, Larry...

This stuff is fantastic... 
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: FreddieC on Feb 27, 2017, 05:16 pm
These are great projects. I will be posting mine pretty soon.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on Feb 27, 2017, 07:02 pm
I am looking forward to hosting all this stuff on http://ArduinoInfo.Info

.. If the authors agree..

Could be done in Wiki fashion, or other pages if someone wants to develop pages differently..

Other suggestions??
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Feb 27, 2017, 07:24 pm
Help yourself to anything I've posted. Would that just be recreating the Playground though? Honestly I haven't been there much.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 27, 2017, 09:33 pm
What advantage does this have over magnetic parts trays? This seems unnecessarily top heavy.
Since the cup is above the magnet there will be no magnetizing of the parts within, maybe an advantage.

Top heavy, no, there is a powerful magnet holding the cup to the 304 stainless steel.



.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 27, 2017, 09:47 pm
Build an adjustable street light inspection light to illuminate the area you are working on.
Lamp is as discussed in post 77.
You can relocate the lamp to any magnet surface.

The lamp can be turn on the SS surface and adjusted to the required angle.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201332)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201334)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201341)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 27, 2017, 09:50 pm
OK, I had two more magnet cups left over.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201339)


.,
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: MAS3 on Feb 27, 2017, 10:57 pm
Best thread ever !
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ChrisTenone on Feb 28, 2017, 12:11 am
I have one living next door.
She certainly is magnetic  :)
Dang! You, dally, ... it must be springtime! <3<3<3
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Feb 28, 2017, 12:26 am
Springtime  ;)

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201339)

Hell it's minus 18'C :(

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Feb 28, 2017, 01:05 am
Hell it's minus 18'C :(

.
Do standard wifi routers actually work at those temperatures.?

Do they not melt your igloo ?  :)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TomGeorge on Feb 28, 2017, 06:53 am
I am looking forward to hosting all this stuff on http://ArduinoInfo.Info

.. If the authors agree..

Could be done in Wiki fashion, or other pages if someone wants to develop pages differently..

Other suggestions??
No problems with mine.
Tom... :)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 01, 2017, 12:07 am
4 views of everything.
I have now thrown my old workstation in the garbage.  ;D
The following post is a high-resolution view of the front.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201484)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201486)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201488)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201490)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 01, 2017, 12:07 am
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201492)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Mar 01, 2017, 06:00 am
You forgot to show us how it's all used.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201519)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TomGeorge on Mar 01, 2017, 06:02 am
Looks like a dentist surgery set of instruments... :o :o :o :o :o
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 01, 2017, 09:57 pm
You forgot to show us how it's all used.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201519)
Well most of the stuff was covered when each object's construction was discussed.

Here is one of the main uses, manual SMD soldering.

The board shown was soldered by Crossroads.

This jig does similar results.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201664)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201666)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201668)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: CrossRoads on Mar 01, 2017, 10:05 pm
Yes, that's a BobuinoII that we would have applied solder paste with a mylar stencil fromPololu.com and then reflowed in our handy dandy ancient 4-element Sears Kenmore toaster oven.
Looks weird from that angle!
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Power_Broker on Mar 01, 2017, 11:34 pm
For the station, maybe include a desk fan for soldering ventilation?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 02, 2017, 12:07 am
Yes, I have a 12VDC fan mounted on two magnets, not shown.
I should buy stock in magnets ;)

I use the fan when I use the soldering iron.
I was going to add a pipe to it and move the fumes through a box where a second fan, aiding the first, would either force the air through a carbon filter or trough a water filter.

One of my things to do projects.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Watcher on Mar 02, 2017, 07:19 am

I made this  (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdrFsuAcm48)soldering fume extractor following instructions from here and works real well.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 02, 2017, 07:55 am
I made this  (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdrFsuAcm48)soldering fume extractor following instructions from here and works real well.
Thank you Watcher.
I think this will be a good addition to my work bench.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201737)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 04, 2017, 12:42 am
Drawing of the hot air tool shelf on the soldering station from post 276.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202022)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202026)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 04, 2017, 12:45 am
Tweezers are a must have tool to pick up small components.
For SMD work you may want to look at the following options for pickup tools.

Regular tweezers are fine, but might suffer from being magnetic.
It can be frustrating to pick up a washer or some SMDs then find out you cannot drop it because the tweezers have become magnetised.
This is a good inexpensive set that is non-magnetic and includes different shaped ends.
https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B019SMDFC0/ref=pe_386430_121528420_TE_dp_1 (https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B019SMDFC0/ref=pe_386430_121528420_TE_dp_1)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202028)

A while back I discussed what I refer to as a 'SMD Pen'.
You can see how to make your own at the following thread.
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=219982.0 (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=219982.0)

Letting go of the finial releases the component.
It works great but is limited to no smaller than 1206 SMDs.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202030)

One accepted method for handling SMDs is with a vacuum pickup tool.
There is a great video on YouTube to refer to.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJWUUK1s_G0 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJWUUK1s_G0)

Source for air pump:
https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B0009YF4FI/ref=pe_386430_126088100_TE_item (https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B0009YF4FI/ref=pe_386430_126088100_TE_item)

The only drawback of this tool is you might get a hickey on your finger.

Before you make the vacuum release hole in the syringe, position the tool in your hand with a lure locked nib in place, then pick a comfortable location for the hole.

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195080)

I used a hot small brass pipe to make the hole seen in the image.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202032)


.



Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: allanhurst on Mar 04, 2017, 02:14 am
Q : why would you need non-magnetic tools to handle SMD parts?
A : because the terminals are plated with nickel


Allan
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 04, 2017, 02:23 am
Yes, some SMD resistors can be attracted to a magnet.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 05, 2017, 01:26 am
It can be frustrating to use Arduino Pro Minis and Bobweeny type boards with a breadboard because these cards take up a lot of real-estate.
Add two 1.75" standoffs to a breadboard thereby raising the controllers to a second story.
This way you do not lose any breadboard column connections.
The standalone controller card is mounted on a 'proto board' as seen in the images.
The header pins are a 1:1 relation to the controller card pins.
I flared the header pins out at the top so the controller PCB does not interfere with the jumper pins.

Using DuPont male to male wires, you jumper the upstairs headers to the breadboard below.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202189)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202191)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202193)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202195)

The pièce de résistance comes when we get Crossroad's new Mega breadboard friendly board Megaweeny.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=455570.0;attach=201709)




.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 05, 2017, 01:27 am
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202197)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202199)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: CrossRoads on Mar 05, 2017, 02:01 am
Assembled MegaDip pics in a few days.  I didn't have voltage regulators or diodes in the packages needed; parts have been ordered.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 05, 2017, 03:36 am
With your new Mega card, we will not need the proto card carrier.
The standoffs will attach directly to your card, then solder on headers.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 05, 2017, 06:57 pm
It can be frustrating to find the correct sized insulated washer when you need to add a metal screw to a PCB.
The plastic in an old gift card is great for making the size of washer you require.
First make sure you cash the card in.   ;)
Align one card perfectly with the other card.
Clamp the two cards together with a bulldog clip.
Drill two registration corner holes.
Make sure these holes are a tight fit with registration screws, example for a 2-56 screw, use drill bit #43, in fact I would go as low as #45.
Screw the two cards together, drill random 1/2 mm holes through both cards.
Space these holes at reasonable spacing for making the outside diameter of the washer.
Separate the two cards.
Note: Each punch has a center brad point.  Use this point to center the punch on the 1/2 mm holes made above.
On one card, at each 1/2 mm hole, punch holes for the inside diameter required.
On the second card, at each 1/2 mm hole, punch holes for the outside diameter required.
Place the two cards together again with the two registration screws.
Using the same punch that you used for the outside diameter holes, punch the inside diameter card.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202356)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202358)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202360)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202362)

Edit:
If you lean towards the obsessive, tape a piece of paper with a 2D array of dots on the card before you drill the 1/2 mm holes.
.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 05, 2017, 07:01 pm
Put some thought into your work area surfaces.
This is what I am using.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202366)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Watcher on Mar 06, 2017, 01:56 pm
If anyone is interested in an arduino controlled electronic load, I recently made this one (http://www.instructables.com/id/Arduino-Programmable-Constant-Current-Power-Resist/).

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202472)

The total cost doesn't exceed 80 Euros including the box and it works real well. By changing a few components in the original design you can even upgrade the specs. Mine now can handle  upto 75V as opposed to the original 24V. I have also added additional software features such as complete remote control from the serial port, thermal shutdown etc.

NB: Photo above is from the original article and comments that follow.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TomGeorge on Mar 06, 2017, 02:11 pm
Hi,

If anyone is interested in an arduino controlled electronic load, I recently made this one (http://www.instructables.com/id/Arduino-Programmable-Constant-Current-Power-Resist/).

The total cost doesn't exceed 80 Euros including the box and it works real well. By changing a few components in the original design you can even upgrade the specs. Mine now can handle  upto 75V as opposed to the original 24V. I have also added additional software features such as complete remote control from the serial port, thermal shutdown etc.

WOW an Destructible project that actually works and is presented in a full and comprehensive manner.
Congrats.. Looks good with diagrams and pictures.

Tom... :)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Watcher on Mar 06, 2017, 02:17 pm
Quote
WOW an Destructible project ...
Guess you mean constructable... :)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 06, 2017, 04:27 pm
I have wanted to make a load like that but have never got around to it.  :(

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 06, 2017, 04:28 pm
I often use a proto board as a template for drilling equally spaced holes.
Conveniently, the proto board has holes drilled at .1-inch spacing.
Use a bulldog clip to clamp the proto board to your work.
On the back of the proto board, mark the location where each required hole is to be drilled.
Drill a 1 or 2 mm pilot hole at each location.
Remove the drilling template (proto board).
Enlarge the pilot holes to their final size.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202511)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 07, 2017, 08:53 pm
Sometimes it is difficult to marry up a motor to hardware.

Standoffs can be a good way to attach a motor shaft to a threaded rod.

Standoffs come in 2-56, 4-40, 6-32, 8-32, 3 - 4 mm and others.

The following shows one way to accomplish the above.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202710)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202712)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202714)

Edit:
See post 307 also.
.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 07, 2017, 08:57 pm
You can of course add extra items to detect when the traveler reaches limits.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202720)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202718)


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Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: westfw on Mar 08, 2017, 07:59 am
Quote
work area surfaces.
As shown, don't you wind up with static-prone (silicone, teflon) plastics next to your actual chips?
(I guess silicone and teflon are right next to each other in the triboelectric series, but...  All those different materials make me really nervous!)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triboelectric_effect (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triboelectric_effect)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 08, 2017, 05:20 pm
@westfw

Actually I was trying to save on image attachments there.

The surfaces I want to work with are brought in at the time I need them.
The anti-static mat is always there though.

BTW
The top surface is the stainless steel covered with Teflon.
This surface is the one usually used as the magnetic tools, clamps etc. need the SS.
On the bottom of this surface, I am covering the SS about 1 inch (fold over) which is taped on all four sides.
This leaves the majority of the steel exposed to touch the anti-static mat.

Never had problems with static affecting components.
It is very dry here.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 08, 2017, 07:27 pm
When using your hot air wand, protect the surrounding components from heat damage.

Aluminum foil tape link (https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.intertape-polymer-group-hvac-general-purpose-15-mil-aluminum-foil-tape-3-x-50-yards---2-pack.1000806119.html)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202856)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202858)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202860)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202868)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 08, 2017, 07:30 pm
Use heat shrink to color code toggle switches.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202864)

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Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 09, 2017, 04:44 pm
Moving that USB power adaptor around can be a real pain.
Consider replacing your workbench outlet(s) with one that integrates a 3.1 amp USB jack.

https://www.lowes.ca/electrical-outlets/legrand-radiant-15-amp-125-volt-white-indoor-decorator-wall-outletusb_g2603912.html?searchTerm=usb (https://www.lowes.ca/electrical-outlets/legrand-radiant-15-amp-125-volt-white-indoor-decorator-wall-outletusb_g2603912.html?searchTerm=usb)


(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202988)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202990)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Mar 09, 2017, 07:24 pm
What's a source for that timer? I've seen ones that can schedule on/off times be not one like that.

On the subject of power strips, you can get ones with sockets that are rotatable  (https://www.amazon.com/360-Electrical-36051-Outlet-Protector/dp/B00AOR2QZG/ref=pd_sim_23_2?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B00AOR2QZG&pd_rd_r=NPG93XPENCFDFNVDF4B6&pd_rd_w=6A9pX&pd_rd_wg=7XOFx&psc=1&refRID=NPG93XPENCFDFNVDF4B6)or spaced out (https://www.amazon.com/Belkin-BE112230-08-12-Outlet-Power-Protector/dp/B000J2EN4S/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1489083658&sr=8-1&keywords=belkin+surge+protectors) so that you have options for fitting in those stupid fat wall warts that come in 100 different shapes and sizes and can never fit together on normal power strips.

Also with individual outlet switches (https://www.amazon.com/Tripp-Lite-Individually-Controlled-TLP76MSG/dp/B0068LACFI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1489083797&sr=8-1&keywords=surge+protector+with+outlet+switches).
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 09, 2017, 07:48 pm
Wall Timer.

'Can' supply inductive loads:
Timer 1 link (https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.decora-preset-60-minute-digital-countdown-timer.1000742640.html)


Not sure if this one can supply inductive loads though:
Time 2 link (https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.timer-in-wall-4-hr-countdown.1000770177.html)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 09, 2017, 07:54 pm
Someone asked the source of the crimper used in this thread.

Stay away from the cheaper ones on eBay.

This is the one used:
https://www.pololu.com/product/1928 (https://www.pololu.com/product/1928)

(https://a.pololu-files.com/picture/0J3271.600x480.jpg?cd47077f62b161acd0e23f8f6daed531)


The Yellow one was purchased at a local store, cannot remember which one.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 10, 2017, 04:37 pm
Further to post 297.

Angle bracket:
https://www.sparkfun.com/products/10228 (https://www.sparkfun.com/products/10228)

(https://cdn.sparkfun.com//assets/parts/4/5/7/8/10228-01.jpg)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=203125)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=203127)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: CrossRoads on Mar 10, 2017, 07:04 pm
Where do you get Kapton tape? I'd like to use some to hold components on the bottom of PCBs while reflowing the tops, just in case, but it's really pricey at Digikey & Mouser.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 10, 2017, 07:33 pm
Where do you get Kapton tape? I'd like to use some to hold components on the bottom of PCBs while reflowing the tops, just in case, but it's really pricey at Digikey & Mouser.

I got some a while back on Amazon but they are out of stock right now.
https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B01I6PFDJ8/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 (https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B01I6PFDJ8/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1)

Looks like there are lots of options though.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_1_6?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=kapton+tape&sprefix=kapton%2Caps%2C169&crid=AOKIWPJ6NH2V (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_1_6?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=kapton+tape&sprefix=kapton%2Caps%2C169&crid=AOKIWPJ6NH2V)


This one is fulfilled by Amazon so you should get it right away in the US.
1 Mil Kapton Tape (Polyimide) - 1" x 36 yds.
https://www.amazon.com/Mil-Kapton-Tape-Polyimide-yds/dp/B006ZFNB2I/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1489170378&sr=8-7&keywords=kapton+tape (https://www.amazon.com/Mil-Kapton-Tape-Polyimide-yds/dp/B006ZFNB2I/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1489170378&sr=8-7&keywords=kapton+tape)

1 Mil Kapton Tape (Polyimide) - 1/2" X 36 Yds
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006ZFQNT6?m=A1RYF7WY9L3HL5&ref_=v_sp_detail_page (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006ZFQNT6?m=A1RYF7WY9L3HL5&ref_=v_sp_detail_page)

4" x 36 yds - 1 Mil Kapton Tape Polyimide Tape
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ATRYG86?m=A1RYF7WY9L3HL5&ref_=v_sp_detail_page (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ATRYG86?m=A1RYF7WY9L3HL5&ref_=v_sp_detail_page)

Items "Fulfilled by Amazon" are offered by a third-party seller, but shipped from an Amazon Fulfillment Center to you.



Just thinking out loud, if the components are soldered on one side then cooled.
Then you turn the board over and place it on ceramic posts/tiles/spacers, will the surface tension hold the comeponets on the underside to the PCB?

http://www.bigceramicstore.com/kilns/kiln-furniture/posts.html (http://www.bigceramicstore.com/kilns/kiln-furniture/posts.html)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 10, 2017, 08:12 pm
If you use a setup like this, the bottom side (opposite to the controller side) could be done manually, shouldn't take more than a few minutes per board. ;)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=201668)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: CrossRoads on Mar 10, 2017, 08:16 pm
"will the surface tension hold the comeponets on the underside to the PCB?"
Supposedly - but I'm gonna have 20 pin SMD connectors, those are pretty hefty,  I don't want them dropping off or sliding around if things aren't quite flat. Some examples (haven't ordered yet);
http://www.digikey.com/products/en/connectors-interconnects/rectangular-connectors-headers-male-pins/314?FV=fff40016%2Cfff802f3%2C1140003%2C16c026f%2C1bf80001%2C1f140000%2Cffe0013a%2C1680001&mnonly=0&newproducts=0&ColumnSort=1000011&page=1&stock=1&pbfree=0&rohs=0&k=header&quantity=&ptm=0&fid=0&pageSize=25&pkeyword=header (http://www.digikey.com/products/en/connectors-interconnects/rectangular-connectors-headers-male-pins/314?FV=fff40016%2Cfff802f3%2C1140003%2C16c026f%2C1bf80001%2C1f140000%2Cffe0013a%2C1680001&mnonly=0&newproducts=0&ColumnSort=1000011&page=1&stock=1&pbfree=0&rohs=0&k=header&quantity=&ptm=0&fid=0&pageSize=25&pkeyword=header)

I'll take a look at the Amazon links, thanks.
I suppose once soldered, I could use a piece of perfboard to hold them in position in the oven as well, then it'd just be the one chip, cd74HC4050, to worry about.
The MegaDip/MegaWeeeny has a lot more parts, the biggest being the 3.3V regulator in a DPAK, I don't want that falling off either.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: CrossRoads on Mar 10, 2017, 08:22 pm
Your pic - you mean just to elevate board? Yes, I have a stack of ~ 30mm square boards that I use for spacers to hold the boards off the tray we use in the oven.

Those SMD connectors are expensive. I'm gonna try just right angle breakaway male headers as well.
http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/sullins-connector-solutions/PRPC040SBAN-M71RC/S1111EC-40-ND/2775294 (http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/sullins-connector-solutions/PRPC040SBAN-M71RC/S1111EC-40-ND/2775294)
(http://media.digikey.com/Photos/Sullins%20Photos/PRPC040SBAN-M71RC.JPG)
That looks a lot more reasonable!
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Mar 10, 2017, 08:38 pm
Yes, for elevation.

Hum, I assumed you would solder the headers by hand, after the SMD components were soldered.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: CrossRoads on Mar 10, 2017, 08:47 pm
Trying to get away from that since the '4050 needs soldering too. Apply past to the board, plunk down three parts, stick it in the oven. Done. Way faster than 56 solder joints by hand.

MegaDip/MegaWeeny, that will be done by hand. Needed holes to accept either male or female headers of different pin lengths, the SMD pads need a lot of room, and the board was already 8/10ths wide. Folks can install what they want, keep it down to a 2-step assembly process, or we'll charge a little more and solder whatever on as a 3rd step.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Mar 10, 2017, 09:04 pm
Where do you get Kapton tape? I'd like to use some to hold components on the bottom of PCBs while reflowing the tops, just in case, but it's really pricey at Digikey & Mouser.

Try the makerbot suppliers.

They have this up to 12" wide and will often supply cut lengths.

Kapton has never been that cheap but i found makerbot much cheaper than RS.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: CrossRoads on Mar 10, 2017, 09:10 pm
Amazon is good enough, and free shipping with Amazon Prime account. I'm only after 1/2" and 1" to make sure SMD parts don't fall off boards that in that range of width.

Worse part is, I have twice bought small rolls at my "local" supplier (45 minute drive away) and we can't find it. Will likely show up as soon as Buy is pressed at the Amazon site ...
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Mar 10, 2017, 09:18 pm
I did not look at larry's links, the amazon prices are probably the best i have ever seen.

Worse part is, I have twice bought small rolls at my "local" supplier (45 minute drive away) and we can't find it. Will likely show up as soon as Buy is pressed at the Amazon site ...
Oh yes done exactly the same.

I use kapton for coils occasionally, new roll every time.

Amazon is good enough, and free shipping with Amazon Prime account. I'm only after 1/2" and 1" to make sure SMD parts don't fall off boards that in that range of width.
Have you ever tried SMT glue ?
I find it useful to prevent 'soldiering' with small resistors also takes away the double sided problem.
I have found that unlike solder it can have a shelf life of 5 years despite the stated 6 months.
Downside is the extra stencil.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Mar 10, 2017, 09:47 pm
Trying to get away from that since the '4050 needs soldering too. Apply past to the board, plunk down three parts, stick it in the oven. Done. Way faster than 56 solder joints by hand.
Dude, knife tip (https://www.hakko.com/english/tip_selection/work_drag.html#type_k). I've done two posts about it in this thread, the more recent one should only be a couple pages back. It is seriously amazing, way better than a chisel tip.

Flux up your pins, feed a blob of solder onto the side of the knife, then just drag it down the line, keeping the blob fed as you go. You could probably do the 40 pin socket for a Bobduino in under a minute.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: polymorph on Mar 16, 2017, 07:30 pm
Soldiering? I am guessing you mean what I've always heard called Tombstoning?

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/HZyGd4DCFn8/hqdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Mar 16, 2017, 08:51 pm
Yes.
Stood to attention.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Hutkikz on Mar 27, 2017, 07:45 pm
Just had to bump my favorite thread back to the top.
But the only tip I have is Don't eat the yellow snow- Zappa

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ilguargua on Mar 27, 2017, 07:59 pm
Just had to bump my favorite thread back to the top.
But the only tip I have is Don't eat the yellow snow- Zappa


+1  ... Watch out where the huskies go, and don't you eat that yellow snow


Ciao, Ale.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Mar 27, 2017, 08:16 pm
So I might have to convert a little bit to the Bent Tip cult religion team...look, it just works well, OK?

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=205798)

I bought a soldering kit for my little sister to assemble, and she had a much easier time using the bent tip than either a chisel or knife tip. I still haven't used it myself (haven't had to solder anything recently), but there's at least some good newbie potential in it.

What kit? A theremin (https://www.vellemanstore.com/en/madlab-mlp105-junior-theremin-electronic-kit), and I didn't tell her what it was.  :D  I really wish I had thought to record her reaction when she reached out to touch it for the first time after I plugged in the battery.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: theMusicMan on Mar 28, 2017, 07:56 pm
Hi Larry,

I started THIS (http://arduino-info.wikispaces.com/ArduinoHints) on http://ArduinoInfo.Info (http://ArduinoInfo.Info)

May I add yours??

Anyone else??


Terry - I have seen a wiki site you have started and read an excellent article on there about controlling AC power with power FET's.  Would you mind if I dropped you an email?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on May 09, 2017, 10:49 pm
Bending your own SMD machine pin strips.

See attached PDF file.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=211297)


.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on May 09, 2017, 10:59 pm
Terry - I have seen a wiki site you have started and read an excellent article on there about controlling AC power with power FET's.  Would you mind if I dropped you an email?
Sorry just saw this! Please email terry@yourduino.com
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on May 27, 2017, 09:39 pm
I recently upgraded an iPad app that I use everyday (~$10.00 for the upgrade).
I use 'PDF Expert' for all my PDF reference materials: data sheets, books, articles, equipment manuals  etc.
PDFs, like the 650 page Amtel328 data sheet, can be: searched, bookmarked, annotated, edited and sent to other apps or printers.
The new upgrade allows you to:
- edit existing text - font/color/content/size/position
- add/move/resize images
- redact text
- link text to other page or WEB references.  
Of course, you can still annotate: draw/highlight/add comments/add text/add signatures/add and delete sheets/add stamps.
I always sync my PDF documents to offsite storage for a backup.

I got rid of 300 pounds of data books from my shelves.

Can't live without it!

(I have no affiliation to PDF Expert)
https://pdfexpert.com/ (https://pdfexpert.com/)


(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=213423)

Example, before and after:
(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=213425)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=213433)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jun 07, 2017, 10:08 pm
I just received some 1284 Logger and MegaDIP boards from Crossroads.

If you ever need more I/O and more hardware serial ports these boards are for you.
Here is a MegaDIP mounted on a second story breadboard assembly.
Thanks Bob.

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=214676)

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=214674)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Power_Broker on Jun 07, 2017, 10:14 pm
I just received some 1284 Logger and MegaDIP boards from Crossroads.

If you ever need more I/O and more hardware serial ports these boards are for you.
Here is a MegaDIP mounted on a second story breadboard assembly.
Thanks Bob.

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=214676)

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=214674)
Looks like the beginnings of a serious project. What are you building with it?


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jun 07, 2017, 10:27 pm
I did not have an Arduino Mega2560 yet, wanted to get more I/O for a test jig I making.
86 I/O lines, (16 analog inputs, 4 hardware serial, 74 digital I/O)
All in a dip package.

Also, the 1284 Logger not shown here, has two hardware serial ports and a micro SD card for logging. Placing it in a serial data analyzer I am working on.

What you see here is a hardware staging breadboard discussed earlier on this thread.

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jul 12, 2017, 02:17 am
Every now and then you might want to protect PCB components with a piece of clear plastic.
The clear plastic allows LEDs, LCDs, etc. to show through and it protects things from accidentally shorting.

Save those old DVD/CD cases and use them to do the job.
These cases are about .05 inches thick and are easily cut to size.

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=218565)

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=218567)

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=218569)

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=218571)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Coding Badly on Jul 12, 2017, 02:37 am

I love Irwin clamps.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ballscrewbob on Jul 12, 2017, 02:43 am
My preference is for CARVER clamps but almost impossible to find on the shelf in US and Canada.

They make irwin clamps and similar look like beginners clamps. LOL
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jul 12, 2017, 07:25 pm
Per image #3 in post 331.
Made some of these boards a few weeks back.
They greatly speed up wiring and in checking out that code with LEDs and switches.
Just plug the assembly in the female headers.
6 LEDs and 6 PB switches.
Having the PCB on a 18" umbilical cord makes things quite convenient.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=218662)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=218658)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=218660)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=218569)


Edit:
See post #391 for the sample sketch to go with this circuit.


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Jul 13, 2017, 12:08 am
Anyone know of a cheap source of flux in the UK that i can use with a dropper or nail file brush please ?
Pens are rather expensive , all i want is the flux.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Aug 22, 2017, 06:19 am
Make your breadboard jumpers well ahead of time.
A good source for wires is old computer and Telco cables.
For breadboards, I recommend Telco #22 and #24 AWG wires, but prefer #24.
Both stranded and solid #24 AWG is available in the Telco color code scheme.
My preference is to use #24 AWG 'stranded wire' for jumpers but you must do some work to make them usable.
The Telco coloring has five tracer group colors: White, Red, Black, Yellow and Violet.
Each tracer group, has five color pairs: Blue, Orange, Green, White and Slate.
One complete bundle contains 25 pairs or 50 wires.
50 wire colors give a well diversified color layout for your breadboard projects.
I like the version where the insulation is one solid color (eg: White) with a quick splash of color (eg: Blue)
W/BE is the TIP wire and BE/W is the RING wire.
A big part in wire preparation is the tinning of the stranded wire.
A solder pot is ideal but a soldering iron is adequate; using flux is advised.  

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223101)


(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223103)

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223105)


(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223107)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Watcher on Aug 22, 2017, 07:13 am
I really liked the trick with the CD case plastic protection.

On a similar note, how would you insulate a part of a PCB track that has been left bare (no mask) intentionally in order to enhance the ampacity with additional solder + copper later. For example see the following picture of a PCB I made:

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223109)




The top tracks are shown bare, exposed . Reason is I intend to add additional layers of solder and copper to increase their current carrying capacity as they will be carrying upto 10A at 240V AC (relay footprint below).
It would be nice to add some kind of insulation later on. Is their any sort of insulating spray / lacquer ?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Aug 22, 2017, 08:00 am
First off, solder mask is designed for masking solder flow during the soldering process.
It offers some insulation quality but is not designed for such.

In your example consider this using slippery tape.
The glue it uses is outstanding.
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=32182&cat=1,110,43466,32182  (http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=32182&cat=1,110,43466,32182)

(http://www.leevalley.com/en/images/item/woodworking/assorted/25u0401s2(2).jpg)

Kapton tape might be an option.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/7C35oUcYHnC0b8G1j1OVbYs8XFxSnXb7Ax_LaA70cyVcTN_4aPQbQayy2D2L-CpIsAl_Ihx9YO4dKRU0-n9ndAqCXZo)

A third option is epoxy glue or clear silicone glue, I have used both as electrical insulation.
(http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/1000/20/206f5612-2ef2-47c2-ab9c-a641cdb8c446_1000.jpg)

.





Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Watcher on Aug 22, 2017, 10:40 am
Quote
A third option is epoxy glue or clear silicone glue, I have used both as electrical insulation.
How about hot glue, from glue sticks ?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ElCaron on Aug 22, 2017, 04:31 pm
How about hot glue, from glue sticks ?
I would like to know that too. I have certainly seen a lot of hot glue in commercial products. On the other hand, it is often very hard to find a datasheet for hot glue (not even for brand stuff like Steinl) and you never know what is in the batch at hand. Might work with one and fail with another. I like to use black one lately, because it looks better, but color adds another factor of uncertainty.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Aug 22, 2017, 06:39 pm
I have also used hot glues.
There are several consistencies available.

If the areas are perfectly flat, tape works well and is reversible.

Silicone glue is my favourite, but is difficult to remove.
Hot glue is more easily removed when needed, but does not adhere as well as silicone.
Glues are good for non flat areas such as soldered pads, terminals, switch leads etc.
.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Aug 22, 2017, 07:29 pm
If you're looking for a self-adjusting wire stripper, avoid one where the cutting head has inset blades in the "mandibles" (can't think of anything else to call them).

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223209)
Garbage

The blade destroys several strands of stranded wire no matter what I do, and on solid-core wire it's just as likely to pull the wire through the insulation as it is to pull the insulation off. The tension adjust knob is worthless, and needs to be almost completely unscrewed to make any real difference. The knob is also not captive, so you can take it completely off and let the spring fall out if you want (three cheers for removable and easily losable parts!). On any tension setting except "bare minimum before the knob falls out", there's at least a 50% chance of cutting straight through 22-gauge solid-core instead of stripping it. Squeezing it has a raspy quality that feels like nails on a chalkboard.

If you couldn't tell by now, I hate this tool. It is literally useless at performing what should be its primary function. Free would still not be cheap enough for this tool to be worth it.

No, if you're going to get one, get the style where the "mandibles" are solid molded chucks of metal. Literally everything bad about the previous style is good in this one. The tension adjust actually makes a difference, the adjustment screw is captive, the mandible edge doesn't nick or damage the wire, and the squeezing feels much smoother and doesn't give make shivers crawl up my spine.

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223211)
The good kind.

I'm also not a fan of the "muncher" style. The blades are similar to the first style and damage the wire, and I can't figure out what difference any setting on the alleged "tension adjust" knob makes. The wire cutter is good though.

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223213)
Muncher style
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Aug 22, 2017, 07:47 pm
"can't think of anything else to call them"
Friday the 13th killing weapon.

For smallish wire mentioned above, I love these.

(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcToVmuh5uGXUaYRDCcKOeJKHq0PNil959hWYoYufpAmluFnn1kJ)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=353064.0;attach=140421)

Available in many wire sizes:
(https://www.jonard.com/~/media/Images/Products/Detail/SB-2830.ashx)

(https://www.specialized.net/media/catalog/product/cache/image/e9c3970ab036de70892d86c6d221abfe/3/5/350x763_pli-fluke-networks-44200013.jpg)

(http://patcoinc.net/images/TOOL_03.jpg)


.


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Aug 22, 2017, 09:47 pm
Some breadboard stuff.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223251)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223239)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223241)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223243)



.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Aug 22, 2017, 09:47 pm
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223245)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223247)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223249)



.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ballscrewbob on Aug 23, 2017, 02:41 am


(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223211)
The good kind.

I'm also not a fan of the "muncher" style. The blades are similar to the first style and damage the wire, and I can't figure out what difference any setting on the alleged "tension adjust" knob makes. The wire cutter is good though.

I have the good kind and they also have a small adjustment for the tension / wire gauge. (12 years and still not quite worked it out either LOL)

Best thing I have ever had and they also allow me to tap into a wire anywhere along the length too as most insulation squeezes apart without damaging the copper.
Made some pretty nice "tap ins" using them.
German made and the quality shines and yes the cutter works well as does the crimper section.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Aug 23, 2017, 07:13 pm
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223249)

I don't think I've seen these in this thread before. Are the Dupont-to-breadboard just tinned stranded wire on the "breadboard" end?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Aug 23, 2017, 11:16 pm
You can use Dupont to Dupont but the 'rule for me' says not to use Dupont in the holes at the center of the breadboard.

I always use Duponts in female headers.

I am referring to them as 'Dupont to breadboard': Dupont on one side and #24 wire twisted and tinned on the other.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223346)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223344)



.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Aug 24, 2017, 06:37 am
Keep your small parts in check with double stick/sided tape or with new 'Gel Cell Anti Slip Pad' technology.
Gel cell sticky pads can be used over and over again, just wash them under water.

https://www.banggood.com/Honana-HN-CH014-Sticky-Gel-Cell-Pad-Anti-Slip-Phone-Pads-Kitchen-Bathroom-House-Car-Holder-p-1177039.html?rmmds=myorder (https://www.banggood.com/Honana-HN-CH014-Sticky-Gel-Cell-Pad-Anti-Slip-Phone-Pads-Kitchen-Bathroom-House-Car-Holder-p-1177039.html?rmmds=myorder)

https://www.amazon.ca/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=gel+cell+sticky+pad  (https://www.amazon.ca/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=gel+cell+sticky+pad)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223362)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223364)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223366)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223368)



.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Watcher on Aug 24, 2017, 11:13 am
Quote
I always use Duponts in female headers.
Any tips on easy stripping/crimping / installing  of Duponts on multiple wires?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Aug 24, 2017, 04:09 pm
Any tips on easy stripping/crimping / installing  of Duponts on multiple wires?
These ones are #26 AWG and are quite easy to make.
Just make sure you have equal lengths stripped in the pin that has the two wires.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223243)

You may have caught this PDF already in post #28.
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=376971.msg2599211#msg2599211 (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=376971.msg2599211#msg2599211)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=376971.0;attach=153668)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223425)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on Aug 24, 2017, 04:36 pm
I would pay a lot for some of Larry's Spare Time :-) 

Also his persistence and willingness to share!
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Aug 24, 2017, 06:17 pm
What's great about this community is that volunteers do share their skill sets.

Further to post #336.

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=32173&cat=1,43326 (http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=32173&cat=1,43326)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223434)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223436)


.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: robtillaart on Aug 24, 2017, 07:15 pm
Made this thread sticky as I found it really usefull !
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Aug 25, 2017, 11:15 pm
The use of a 'Solder Pot' was mentioned in post #336, someone asked what this was.

After the solder liquefies (~ 10 minutes), do not move the pot.
Unplug the pot when you finish your work.
Takes about 2 hours before it is safe to move.


http://www.jameco.com/z/GSR-810A-KC60B-Solder-Pot-300-Watt-110VAC-2-7A-2-Prong-Plug-2-5-Dia-x-1-63-Deep_1951625.html (http://www.jameco.com/z/GSR-810A-KC60B-Solder-Pot-300-Watt-110VAC-2-7A-2-Prong-Plug-2-5-Dia-x-1-63-Deep_1951625.html)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223853)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223559)

Once the water is gone the Solder Pot is dangerous!
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223561)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223563)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Aug 25, 2017, 11:15 pm
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223567)

Should be 390'C
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223585)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223571)

Skim with a dry, wide bladed screw driver.
With a rag, wipe off solidified solder from the end of the screw driver.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223573)



Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Aug 25, 2017, 11:15 pm
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223575)

Skim surface as needed.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223577)



Unplug the pot when you finish your work.
Takes about 2 hours before it is safe to move.


FYI
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YkC_Oc1Wpq8   (https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YkC_Oc1Wpq8)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 01, 2017, 11:44 pm
Mentioned this in the 'Bar Sport forum'

https://www.banggood.com/MECHANIC-2-in-1-Double-deck-Multi-function-Silicone-Mat-Pad-Maintenance-Platform-BGA-Work-Station-p-1159929.html?rmmds=search (https://www.banggood.com/MECHANIC-2-in-1-Double-deck-Multi-function-Silicone-Mat-Pad-Maintenance-Platform-BGA-Work-Station-p-1159929.html?rmmds=search)

This makes a great addition to your work bench.
There are several versions available on eBay.
This version is made up of 2 silicone mats.
There are storage cells for items, I added some magnetic bottoms on a few of the larger cells.
The smaller cells are good for SMD devices.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224445)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224447)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224473)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224451)


.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 01, 2017, 11:44 pm
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224457)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224495)



.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 01, 2017, 11:44 pm
You may find these magnifiers handy ~$70

https://www.banggood.com/G600-Digital-1-600X-3-6MP-4-3inch-HD-LCD-Display-Microscope-Continuous-Magnifier-Upgrade-Version-p-1152799.html?rmmds=search (https://www.banggood.com/G600-Digital-1-600X-3-6MP-4-3inch-HD-LCD-Display-Microscope-Continuous-Magnifier-Upgrade-Version-p-1152799.html?rmmds=search)

This version comes with an aluminum stand.
Could be use while soldering, but suggest you use a stereo microscope.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224475)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224480)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224465)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 01, 2017, 11:44 pm
A fume extractor, in this case one that just sucks/blows the fumes from the area where you are soldering.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224467)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224469)



.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 06, 2017, 02:28 am
Further to:
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3115248#msg3115248 (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3115248#msg3115248)
And
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3109398#msg3109398 (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3109398#msg3109398)

Small PCBs can be a challenge to mount in a project case.
This is especially true if the are no mounting holes in the PCB.
Below shows one way to attach an Arduino Pro Mini to the top of a case.

Note: no holes are made in the project case.
If the Pro Mini fails, just throw the assembly away with the Pro mini.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224941)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224943)


.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 06, 2017, 02:29 am
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224945)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224947)



.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 06, 2017, 09:22 am
Any good DIYr/hobbyist should have a good set of carbide rotary cutting burrs.
These are used with an adjustable speed tool like a Dremel.
Burr speed 'must' be matched to the material you are working with ex: plastics slow, aluminum faster.
Examples, you may want to:
- enlarge a hole a little bit to the left of where it is
- create a slot to mount a switch, motor, rectangular LED etc.
- bevel one side of the hole
- create a key way

For safety reasons, 'never' drill a starting hole with the burr itself.
Just as important, never use a burr that has a larger diameter than the starting hole.
Always clamp your work.
Let the burr do the work, do not force the tool.
Cut/shape from the bad side of your work.
The burr turns clock wise CW; moving the tool CW, will give better tool control, best experiment on piece of scrap.

Use safety glasses when working.

Example:
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/10x-Titanium-Coat-Carbide-1-5mm-3-175mm-End-Mill-Engraving-Bits-CNC-Rotary-Burrs-/141219896957?hash=item20e15c9e7d:g:fGoAAOxykMpTIQ7P (http://www.ebay.ca/itm/10x-Titanium-Coat-Carbide-1-5mm-3-175mm-End-Mill-Engraving-Bits-CNC-Rotary-Burrs-/141219896957?hash=item20e15c9e7d:g:fGoAAOxykMpTIQ7P)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224961)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=224963)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=225087)



.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Sep 06, 2017, 01:47 pm
Examples, you may want to:
- enlarge a hole a little bit to the left of where it is
- create a slot to mount a switch, motor, rectangular LED etc.
- bevel one side of the hole
- create a key way
Because normal drill bits suck horribly for these things. Take it from me, just don't even try it.

Quote
For safety reasons, 'never' drill a starting hole with the burr itself.
Just as important, never use a burr that has a larger diameter than the starting hole.
What is the risk? That it "runs away"?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Sep 06, 2017, 01:49 pm
Examples, you may want to:
- enlarge a hole a little bit to the left of where it is
But what if I want to enlarge my hole a little bit to the right? Do I need a different tool?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ElCaron on Sep 06, 2017, 03:46 pm
But what if I want to enlarge my hole a little bit to the right? Do I need a different tool?
Turn the PCB around?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 07, 2017, 12:12 am
But what if I want to enlarge my hole a little bit to the right? Do I need a different tool?
Life is tough ;)

Quote
What is the risk? That it "runs away"?
Yes the tool can/will skirt across the surface.



Also, the burr should be ( ;) ) turning clock wise CW.
You will find moving the tool clock clockwise CW, will give better tool control.
Best experiment on a piece of scrap.

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 12, 2017, 12:04 am
DIY 3rd hand with connection to power supply and DVM.
This uses 'Pin jacks/plugs' you can also use 'Banana jacks/plugs'.

Magnets are attracted to the stainless steel 403 work surface with Teflon covering.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=225585)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=225571)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=225573)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 12, 2017, 12:04 am
That's 'vertical' ;)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=225575)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=225577)

.


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 12, 2017, 06:50 pm
Make a new project standoff from an existing standoff .

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=225684)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=225686)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=225688)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=225690)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 12, 2017, 06:50 pm
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=225692)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=225694)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=225696)

.
Title: Silicone wire and Stepped drill bits
Post by: JohnRob on Sep 15, 2017, 10:59 pm
Hi,

I couple of tips some users might find handy:

1) The use of stepped drill bits.  Long ago I thought stepped drill bits were a gimmick that only looked good on the hardware store shelf.  Then I tried one and was hooked.  These bits EXCEL in drilling thin plastic and metal.  Drilling a 1/2 or 3/4 inch hole, or even worst trying to expand an existing hole was always troublesome.  With these bits there is no longer a problem and the holes come out perfect.  However you are limited to the diameters on your step drill.
See attached.

Sorry I don't know how to insert a picture.  I tried the insert image button but did know how to get a photo on my desktop to someplace with a URL.

2)  I purchased a current driver on ebay.   When it arrived I noticed it had some really limp wire for the connections.  I was interested because on small projects PVC (or even worse IR PVC) wire is kind of stiff. With some research I found this silicone wire on ebay.

ebay silicone wire (http://www.ebay.com/itm/5M-Flexible-Stranded-Silicone-Rubber-Wire-Cable-26AWG-Gauge-OD-1-5mm-Black-BS5/172742251360?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649)


I chose this particular vendor because they had multiple sizes and colors so I could the wire I wanted from one place and hopefully it would be very similar (it was).

I purchased 5 M of #22, #24 and #26.   What I received was pretty decent wire.  The strands were tin coated, the insulation was very flexible.  My first use was terminating LED light strips.  They always complain when stressed at the termination point.


Hope this helps some folks.

John
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 16, 2017, 12:31 am
Step drill
(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=226050)

I totally agree with using step drills with plastics.
I prefer the ones that have two cutting flutes.

Brad point bits work well too.
http://www.leevalley.com/en/hardware/page.aspx?p=43255&cat=3,41306,41330    (http://www.leevalley.com/en/hardware/page.aspx?p=43255&cat=3,41306,41330)
(http://www.leevalley.com/en/images/item/Woodworking/Drilling/07j1607s3.jpg)

Wire
(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=226052)

Thanks for the tip on that wire.
I've been looking for a supplier for very flexible high strand count wire.
Looks like the insulation will be great too.


I see they have 24AWG 40 strand wire.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/5M-Flexible-Stranded-Silicone-Rubber-Wire-Cable-24AWG-Gauge-OD-1-5mm-Black-BS5-/172742251859?hash=item28383d9553:g:9VsAAOSw~e5ZSrRS   (http://www.ebay.com/itm/5M-Flexible-Stranded-Silicone-Rubber-Wire-Cable-24AWG-Gauge-OD-1-5mm-Black-BS5-/172742251859?hash=item28383d9553:g:9VsAAOSw~e5ZSrRS)


How to post an image:
https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=364156.0  (https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=364156.0)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: JohnRob on Sep 16, 2017, 06:34 am
@larryd,

I've only used the one flute step drills and find them very easy to work with.  I've even used them with thin aluminum chassis with great success.  I would be interested how the two flutes differ.

The brad point bits are probably fine, and for small holes regular jobbers bits work, but as soon as you get above 1/4" diameter things get dicey (at least for me).


Thanks for the link on inline pictures will be very helpful in the future.  I can post more professional results.


Wire:  I stripped and tinned some of the #22 AWG.  The wire tin was bright and shiny, easy to tin.  The strand count seemed to be above the expected 19 strands (but I don't think there are 37 strands, but could be).


John
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 16, 2017, 07:09 am
I've only used the one flute step drills and find them very easy to work with.  I've even used them with thin aluminum chassis with great success.  I would be interested how the two flutes differ.


Wire:  I stripped and tinned some of the #22 AWG.  The wire tin was bright and shiny, easy to tin.  The strand count seemed to be above the expected 19 strands (but I don't think there are 37 strands, but could be).
Here is a two fluted view from the end:

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=226075)

Thanks, just ordered 20M #22AWG Black & Red
I have some old similar wire here, 50 strands.

Also got 1206, 7 colors SMD LEDs from the same place.
Red Green Blue Yellow White Orange Purple
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/172576514694 (http://www.ebay.ca/itm/172576514694)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Watcher on Sep 17, 2017, 10:38 pm
Quote
Also got 1206, 7 colors SMD LEDs from the same place.
I prefer 0805 leds as pcb indicators. Where do u use this size of leds Larry?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 17, 2017, 11:30 pm
Bad eye sight  ;)

I use them as indicators mostly.
See:
https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3336467#msg3336467    (https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3336467#msg3336467)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=218662)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 18, 2017, 03:04 am
One great tool to have is a 'Lab Lift platform'.
Lift height from ~1.75" to 6".
These are about $25.00.
You can position your work off the table for soldering and observation.
Adding a 403 SS surface to the top allows magnetic tools to stick.

https://www.banggood.com/44-inch-Lab-Lift-Lifting-Platforms-Stand-Rack-Scissor-Lab-Lifting-Aluminum-Oxide-p-1022996.html?rmmds=myorder (https://www.banggood.com/44-inch-Lab-Lift-Lifting-Platforms-Stand-Rack-Scissor-Lab-Lifting-Aluminum-Oxide-p-1022996.html?rmmds=myorder)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=226294)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=226296)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=226298)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: polymorph on Sep 18, 2017, 10:09 pm
I think you are talking about test lead wire. Silicone insulation, high number of very thin strands so it is very flexible.

I didn't like the stiff wires on the Shapeoko, so I replaced them with cable chain and 18 gauge test lead wire with silicone insulation and 150 strands.

http://amzn.to/2wq1gFB (http://amzn.to/2wq1gFB)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61LezBnpaZL._SL1001_.jpg)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Sep 18, 2017, 10:19 pm
Even when ordering from RS i have problems selecting the right wire.

Insulation meltback when soldering thru holes is a pet hate with some insulation materials..
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: JohnRob on Sep 20, 2017, 09:52 pm
I know what you mean by melt back, its aggravating especially when the solder doesn't wet immediately.

Regarding the test lead wire.  I have some Beldon 24AWG silicone "Test Lead" wire.  I found it is thicker and not a flexible as the wire I found on ebay (see a few posts back).

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ElCaron on Sep 21, 2017, 09:47 am
Regarding the test lead wire.  I have some Beldon 24AWG silicone "Test Lead" wire.  I found it is thicker and not a flexible as the wire I found on ebay (see a few posts back).
There is also a seller with the same name, but a differnt number at the end, who seems to sell the same stuff with different AWGs and colors as options in one article, and a little cheaper, btw.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Sep 21, 2017, 01:31 pm
, its aggravating especially when the solder doesn't wet immediately.



Time to get new wire.
I recently discarded several reels for this reason , it was 20+ years old though.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ballscrewbob on Sep 21, 2017, 02:16 pm
Love my stepped drills and have for some years in most thinner materials and even thicker but soft ones.

Find the single flute types better as they have less "grab" on very thin materials.
Also agree on the brad points again a valuable piece of kit.

Latest purchase here was a cheap sandblaster (<$30)
Made it super useful with a quick modification to the feed hose.
I dont buy media for it as we have a lot of very fine sand close by that I microwave and then filter through a baking sieve.

SO how is it useful in electronics ?
Well I recycle many components from old boards and a quick blast on the solder side strips all the shellac etc. and also preps all the joints at once for de-solder ;)

I have other uses for it too in semi electronic ways.

The old valve does work as the ON/OFF switch.
Copper pipe was taken out in a recent reno and the shade was a roadside pickup free.
12 volt white LEDS fitted nicely in the rim of the shade
Sandblasted the pipe and then added the patina back.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=226789)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ElCaron on Sep 21, 2017, 07:33 pm
Rather a question for a tip, but i am sure larry has something :D How do I fixate tiny smd components while soldering? Last weekend I soldered a 3216 tantalum cap directly on an SOT223 LDO and then cables to the pins, to make an "in-cable" voltage regulator (then I covered it in black hot-snot for strain relief - power dissipation is low enough). I managed to do it, but it was quite a hassle. Any good suggestion how to hold such components on top of each other?
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Coding Badly on Sep 21, 2017, 08:34 pm

Have you seen the weighted pokey things?

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 21, 2017, 09:51 pm
Rather a question for a tip, but i am sure larry has something :D How do I fixate tiny smd components while soldering? Last weekend I soldered a 3216 tantalum cap directly on an SOT223 LDO and then cables to the pins, to make an "in-cable" voltage regulator (then I covered it in black hot-snot for strain relief - power dissipation is low enough). I managed to do it, but it was quite a hassle. Any good suggestion how to hold such components on top of each other?
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Y9u7mu0WTT0/VNEKYm6JsPI/AAAAAAAAHq0/GZKz-wYoi_I/s1600/2015-02-03%2B17.49.33.jpg)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=198006)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200031)

See this link :
 What the heck, get a coffee and go through the whole thread ~387 posts.  ;)
https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3143697#msg3143697   (https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3143697#msg3143697)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200438)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=200440)


You could apply a very small amount of JB Liquid Steel, or similar, to components to glue them together.
I believe high temperature Liquid Steel is non conductive.


.



Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 22, 2017, 09:26 pm
I know what you mean by melt back, its aggravating especially when the solder doesn't wet immediately.

Regarding the test lead wire.  I have some Beldon 24AWG silicone "Test Lead" wire.  I found it is thicker and not a flexible as the wire I found on ebay (see a few posts back).
Thanks JohnRob

Just received the wire and LEDs, 6 days, $3.50 shipping China to Canada.
AWG 22 silicone rubber insulation
Number of strands counted is 60, extremely flexible!

Zero, nada, no,  shrink back of the insulation when tinning the strands, I would have expected this.
They also have 28, 26 and 24 AWG wire (and larger)

I would recommend this wire/insulation.

Maybe I should get #8 with 1,650 strands ;)

(http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/lXgAAOSwbopZSrRK/s-l400.jpg)


.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 23, 2017, 06:29 pm
One big problem with the soldering mat described in post #358 is it's flexibility.
A medium density polyethylene cutting board solves this problem.

Correction:1.5mm should be 1.5cm
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=227072)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=227064)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=227066)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=227068)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Sep 29, 2017, 09:19 pm
Got a request for the code that goes with post #334, (Using a LED and switch on the same I/O pin).

Forgot to add it to that post :( so here it is now:

Code: [Select]
/*
  Demonstration how to use a pin as an output to a LED
  and at the same time, as an input from a switch.

  Note:
  The LED(s) 'must' be connected to +5V (CA) through a series resistor.
  The switch is connected to GND through a 240 ohm resistor.

  Typical setup for SMD LEDs:
  +5V White  LED - 4.7K - I/O PIN - 240R - Switch GND
  +5V Red    LED - 2.2K - I/O PIN - 240R - Switch GND
  +5V Green  LED - 1.2K - I/O PIN - 240R - Switch GND
  +5V Blue   LED - 4.7K - I/O PIN - 240R - Switch GND
  +5V Yellow LED - 2.2K - I/O PIN - 240R - Switch GND

  LarryD
  Version YY/MM/DD
  1.00    17/06/01   Running code
*/

//Assume 6 LED/Switch combinations are connected to pins as below
const byte HeartBeatLED  = 13; //This LED will be toggled when the switch on this pin is pressed
const byte YellowLED     = 12; //This LED will be toggled when the switch on this pin is pressed
const byte BlueLED       = 11; //This LED will be toggled when the switch on this pin is pressed
const byte GreenLED      = 10; //This LED will be toggled when the switch on this pin is pressed
const byte RedLED        = 9;  //This LED will be toggled when the switch on this pin is pressed
const byte WhiteLED      = 8;  //This LED will be toggled when the switch on this pin is pressed

byte lastHeartBeatSwitchState; //The state this switch was in
byte lastYellowSwitchState;
byte lastBlueSwitchState;
byte lastGreenSwitchState;
byte lastRedSwitchState;
byte lastWhiteSwitchState;

//======================================================================
//An example of Timer 'structure' coding
struct timer
{
  //lastMillis = the time this "timer" was (re)started
  //waitMillis = delay time (mS) we are looking for
  //restart    = do we start "this timer" again and again
  //enableFlag = is "this timer" enabled/allowed to be accessed
  //timeType   = true = millis(), false = micros()
  //**********************
  //For each timer object you need:
  //Example:
  //   timer myTimer = //give the timer a name "myTimer"
  //   {
  //     0, 200UL, true, true, true  //lastMillis, waitMillis, restart, enableFlag, timeType
  //   };
  // You have access to:
  // myTimer.lastMillis, myTimer.waitMillis, myTimer.restart, myTimer.enableFlag, myTimer.timeType, myTimer.CheckTime()
  //**********************

  unsigned long lastMillis;
  unsigned long waitMillis;
  bool          restart;
  bool          enableFlag;
  bool          timeType;

  unsigned long currentTime;

  bool CheckTime() //Delay time expired function "CheckTime()"
  {
    if (timeType == true)
    {
      currentTime = millis();
    }
    else
    {
      currentTime = micros();
    }

    //is the time up for this task?
    if (enableFlag == true && currentTime - lastMillis >= waitMillis)
    {
      //should this start again?
      if (restart)
      {
        //get ready for the next iteration
        lastMillis = currentTime;
      }
      //time was reached
      return true;
    }
    //time was not reached
    return false;

  } //END of CheckTime()

}; //END of structure timer
//======================================================================

//**********************************************************************
//                Create and initialize timer objects
//**********************************************************************

timer checkSwitches =         //create a timer to check the switches
{
  0, 50UL, true, true, true   //lastMillis, waitMillis, restart, enableFlag, true=millis/false=micros
};



//                            s e t u p ( )
//**********************************************************************
void setup()
{
  //**************************************
  digitalWrite(HeartBeatLED, HIGH);  //LED  LOW = ON
  pinMode(HeartBeatLED, OUTPUT);

  digitalWrite(YellowLED, HIGH);     //LED  LOW = ON
  pinMode(YellowLED, OUTPUT);

  digitalWrite(BlueLED, HIGH);       //LED  LOW = ON
  pinMode(BlueLED, OUTPUT);

  digitalWrite(GreenLED, HIGH);      //LED  LOW = ON
  pinMode(GreenLED, OUTPUT);

  digitalWrite(RedLED, HIGH);        //LED  LOW = ON
  pinMode(RedLED, OUTPUT);

  digitalWrite(WhiteLED, HIGH);      //LED  LOW = ON
  pinMode(WhiteLED, OUTPUT);

} //                    E N D  O F  s e t u p ( )


//                             l o o p ( )
//**********************************************************************
void loop()
{

  //*************************************
  //Is it time to check the Switch(s)?
  if (checkSwitches.CheckTime())
  {
    handleSwitchPresses();
  }
  //*************************************


} //                     E N D  O F  l o o p ( )


//======================================================================
//                         F U N C T I O N S
//======================================================================

//**********************************************************************
//               h a n d l e S w i t c h P r e s s e s ( )
//**********************************************************************
void handleSwitchPresses()
{
  //Read our six switches

  byte CurrentSwitchState;

  //***************************
  //Has the switch changed position for this pin?
  CurrentSwitchState = ReadSwitchLED(HeartBeatLED);
  if (lastHeartBeatSwitchState != CurrentSwitchState)
  {
    lastHeartBeatSwitchState = CurrentSwitchState;
    if (CurrentSwitchState == LOW)
    {
      digitalWrite(HeartBeatLED, !digitalRead(HeartBeatLED));
    }
  }

  //***************************
  //Has the switch changed position for this pin?
  CurrentSwitchState = ReadSwitchLED(YellowLED);
  if (lastYellowSwitchState != CurrentSwitchState)
  {
    //update to the new switch state
    lastYellowSwitchState = CurrentSwitchState;

    //when the switch goes from not pushed (HIGH) to pushed (LOW) then do something
    if (CurrentSwitchState == LOW)
    {
      //example: toggle the LED on this pin
      digitalWrite(YellowLED, !digitalRead(YellowLED));
    }
  }

  //***************************
  //Has the switch changed position for this pin?
  CurrentSwitchState = ReadSwitchLED(BlueLED);
  if (lastBlueSwitchState != CurrentSwitchState)
  {
    lastBlueSwitchState = CurrentSwitchState;
    if (CurrentSwitchState == LOW)
    {
      digitalWrite(BlueLED, !digitalRead(BlueLED));
    }
  }

  //***************************
  //Has the switch changed position for this pin?
  CurrentSwitchState = ReadSwitchLED(GreenLED);
  if (lastGreenSwitchState != CurrentSwitchState)
  {
    lastGreenSwitchState = CurrentSwitchState;
    if (CurrentSwitchState == LOW)
    {
      digitalWrite(GreenLED, !digitalRead(GreenLED));
    }
  }

  //***************************
  //Has the switch changed position for this pin?
  CurrentSwitchState = ReadSwitchLED(RedLED);
  if (lastRedSwitchState != CurrentSwitchState)
  {
    lastRedSwitchState = CurrentSwitchState;
    if (CurrentSwitchState == LOW)
    {
      digitalWrite(RedLED, !digitalRead(RedLED));
    }
  }

  //***************************
  //Has the switch changed position for this pin?
  CurrentSwitchState = ReadSwitchLED(WhiteLED);
  if (lastWhiteSwitchState != CurrentSwitchState)
  {
    lastWhiteSwitchState = CurrentSwitchState;
    if (CurrentSwitchState == LOW)
    {
      digitalWrite(WhiteLED, !digitalRead(WhiteLED));
    }
  }

} //      E N D   O F   h a n d l e S w i t c h P r e s s e s ( )


//**********************************************************************
//                    R e a d S w i t c h L E D ( )
//**********************************************************************
//Save the current state of the LED on this pin.
//Read the state of the switch on this pin.
//Return the LED state back to this pin.
//Takes about 14us for this process.

byte ReadSwitchLED(byte thisPin)
{
  //Save the current state of this output pin
  byte PinState = digitalRead(thisPin);

  //read the switch connected to this pin
  pinMode(thisPin, INPUT_PULLUP);
  byte SwitchState = digitalRead(thisPin);

  //return the pin to OUTPUT
  pinMode(thisPin, OUTPUT);
  //restore the pin state
  digitalWrite(thisPin, PinState);

  return SwitchState;

} //            E N D   O F  R e a d S w i t c h L E D ( )


//======================================================================
//                         E N D  O F  C O D E
//======================================================================
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 07, 2017, 04:29 am
One of my favourite hand tools is the 'Razor Saw'.
I use both 24 and 52 TPI versions.  
The 24 cuts a 14 thou kerf and the 52 cuts a 10 thou kerf.
They cut on the pull stroke.

These saws are great for cutting plastics, brass and aluminum.
In project construction, these are a must have tool.

You can buy a miter box for the 24TPI saw but will have to make your own for the 52TPI version.
Using the purchased 24TPI box, add successive layers of wood under the aluminum extrusion (raise in stages until finished making the cut), cut the slots as needed.

These saws are very sharp; make a sheath out of plastic to protect the teeth and you ;) .
Use 'Bull Dog'/Binder clips to secure the sheath.

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=55600&cat=1,42884 (http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=55600&cat=1,42884)

http://www.leevalley.com/en/hardware/page.aspx?p=45161&cat=3,43576,61994,45161 (http://www.leevalley.com/en/hardware/page.aspx?p=45161&cat=3,43576,61994,45161)

(http://www.leevalley.com/en/images/item/Woodworking/Saws/60F0310s01b.jpg)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=228755)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=228767)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 07, 2017, 04:30 am
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=228759)

A silicone mat under the miter box helps prevent slippage.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=228761)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=228763)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TomGeorge on Oct 07, 2017, 05:45 am
Hi
@larryd, do you actually get any work done, or just keep making tools and tool holders.
Your work area is wayyyy to clean.. lol.

Tom... :) :) :)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 07, 2017, 05:51 am
'Clean as you go' is my motto, one of them anyway :) .



Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Coding Badly on Oct 07, 2017, 09:46 am

Those are "binding clips".

This is a bulldog clip (https://www.google.com/search?q=bulldog+clip)...

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=228781;image)

:smiley-twist:

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 07, 2017, 05:27 pm
"  'Bull Dog'/Binder clips to secure the sheath. "
;)
(https://i.pinimg.com/736x/db/33/6e/db336eb631c27f6676efeb983f8f5453--binder-clips-rock-on.jpg)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 08, 2017, 04:27 am
Sooner or later you will make a mounting panel from FR4 or plastic material or you might make a DIY PCB.
Marking and drilling the corner mounting holes can be a pain.

This jig makes equally spaced holes fast and easy to drill.
All you have to do is make the jig ahead of time ;) .

After drilling, save one of the work pieces and use it later as a setup template.

Correction: Angle stop is 1.5" long.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=228913)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=228915)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=228925)


.


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 08, 2017, 04:28 am
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=228919)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=228923)
.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 10, 2017, 11:09 pm
If you are like me, you have a bottle or box full of different sized screws and nuts.

Keep your eyes open for a plastic sorting sorting tray.
Or
If you befriend your pharmacist, see if you can get an old pill dispenser unit.

To help with the sorting task, these are great with that rainy snowy day job, a glass of wine is a must.

For ferrous hardware, tape a magnet under a far off corner of the tray.
Place desired parts over the magnetic area so they stay in that location when you dump the remainder of the hardware back into the box.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=229294)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=229296)

Edit:
You can purchase the pharmacy tray on Amazon and eBay.
https://www.amazon.com/TPS-3722-Counting-Tray-Spatula/dp/B003K7RMDS (https://www.amazon.com/TPS-3722-Counting-Tray-Spatula/dp/B003K7RMDS)




Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 12, 2017, 12:34 am
Make your own screw vise using aluminum extrusions.
The larger jaw is made from a 'T' extrusion; cut off one arm.

The base material is 1/2" Teflon.

Magnets hold the vise firmly to the 403 SS sheet.

A commercially available 3rd hand finishes the project.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=229413)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=229415)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=229417)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=229419)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 12, 2017, 12:34 am
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=229421)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=229423)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=229425)



Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Power_Broker on Oct 17, 2017, 04:23 pm
@larryd, You have a truly expansive and complete setup in your "lab". What sort of projects do you make that require such a vast array of equipment? No doubt they're some pretty cool projects.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Oct 17, 2017, 07:16 pm
Now now e Thread title says it all e Larry posts elsewhere on arduino stuff.

If you befriend your pharmacist, see if you can get an old pill dispenser unit.

To help with the sorting task, these are great with that rainy snowy day job, a glass of wine is a must.


You would be lucky. Most pills come in blister packs these days.
I know because a relative has arthritis badly and i have to open his pack of arthritis pills. :o

Edit.

To be fair the pharmacy offers a weekly pill popping service where they are transferred to an easy to open daily sliding compartment thing.

He has no trouble opening a bottle of scotch however so long as it does not have a childproof cap like those bottles of bleach.
However he has a 7 yr old grandson to help him with that.

A gadget to cope with those would be useful (the type you have to squeeze and turn).

Any ideas Larry ?.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 17, 2017, 08:44 pm
@larryd, You have a truly expansive and complete setup in your "lab". What sort of projects do you make that require such a vast array of equipment? No doubt they're some pretty cool projects.
A few past projects:
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=229995)

Completed (maybe) work station with tool set:
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=229997)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=229999)


Working on animated infinity mirrors.
Edit:
Based on this.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=230001)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 17, 2017, 09:11 pm
Now now e Thread title says it all e Larry posts elsewhere on arduino stuff.

You would be lucky. Most pills come in blister packs these days.
I know because a relative has arthritis badly and i have to open his pack of arthritis pills. :o

Edit.

To be fair the pharmacy offers a weekly pill popping service where they are transferred to an easy to open daily sliding compartment thing.

He has no trouble opening a bottle of scotch however so long as it does not have a childproof cap like those bottles of bleach.
However he has a 7 yr old grandson to help him with that.

A gadget to cope with those would be useful (the type you have to squeeze and turn).

Any ideas Larry ?.
Transfer the internals into an easily manageable bottle.


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 17, 2017, 09:23 pm
Going to make a few of these infinity mirrors:
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=230007)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 21, 2017, 09:05 pm
Further to post 401.

For components like USB connectors, add a horizontal vise to the assembly.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=230464)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=230466)


.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 24, 2017, 04:24 am
Last addition are two rare earth magnets in cups, horizontal and vertical.
As mentioned much earlier, binder/bulldog clips are great for holding work.
The 6-32 screw fits in a threaded hole in the 1/2" Teflon base.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=230740)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=230742)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=230744)





Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 26, 2017, 08:25 pm
We all have a set of tools that are not being contained.
Tools can easily get misplaced, soon we have a set missing that one tool we like the best.
You can keep yourself organized by making your own 'Tool Pouch'.

If you have access to a 'Hand Impulse Heat Sealer Machine' you can design your own roll-up pouch.
These 'Sealer Machines' cost about $40-50 and come with replacement heating parts.

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/282528187573 (http://www.ebay.ca/itm/282528187573)

These easily seal: 6mil poly, anti-static bags and other sheet plastics.

They can also seal that aluminumized half bag of potato chips. ;)

4 mil sheet plastic takes about 2 seconds to seal with 1-2 seconds cool down.

(https://s3-ap-southeast-1.amazonaws.com/a2.datacaciques.com/17/06/12/50nhdf87h97470zl/86270419fbf87f22.jpg)

Below is a 4 mil ZipLoc bag, writing is removed with IPA.
Set the timer dial setting to ~3-4 (1-1.5 sec).
Use a spacer to get even compartments.
A tongue depressor is used.


(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=231126)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=231128)


(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=231130)



Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Oct 26, 2017, 08:25 pm
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=231132)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=231134)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=231136)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Nov 05, 2017, 09:07 pm
Further to post #349
We have all accidentally dumped a bottle of fluid on our work surface.
These 'Sticky Pads' are great in preventing this from happening.
https://www.banggood.com/Honana-HN-CH014-Sticky-Gel-Cell-Pad-Anti-Slip-Phone-Pads-Kitchen-Bathroom-House-Car-Holder-p-1177039.html?rmmds=myorder&cur_warehouse=CN (https://www.banggood.com/Honana-HN-CH014-Sticky-Gel-Cell-Pad-Anti-Slip-Phone-Pads-Kitchen-Bathroom-House-Car-Holder-p-1177039.html?rmmds=myorder&cur_warehouse=CN)


(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=232377)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=232379)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=232381)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Nov 12, 2017, 12:28 am
Moving the top out on an infinity mirror gives a downward image.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=233130)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Nov 12, 2017, 12:29 am
Banana plug to everything (almost).

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=233132)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Nov 28, 2017, 08:34 pm
After a few years, your third hand alligator clips get weak and bent out of shape.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235206)

https://www.amazon.ca/10Pcs-Alligator-Crocodile-Clips-Cable/dp/B07219YN9N/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1511899006&sr=8-1&keywords=10Pcs+Iron+Alligator+Crocodile+Test+Clips  (https://www.amazon.ca/10Pcs-Alligator-Crocodile-Clips-Cable/dp/B07219YN9N/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1511899006&sr=8-1&keywords=10Pcs+Iron+Alligator+Crocodile+Test+Clips)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235208)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235210)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235212)

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Nov 30, 2017, 08:25 pm
Just got a few Arduino Mega clones from Terry (reasonable price!).
http://www.yourduino.com/sunshop/index.php?l=product_detail&p=387 (http://www.yourduino.com/sunshop/index.php?l=product_detail&p=387)

You may need to install an Arduino (here a Mega), in a box/case or other platform.
The Arduino designers made major mistakes in the placement of the mounting holes.
These were placed too close to headers etc.

You can make this happen if you use 2-56 screws.

You can make the washers as in post #290
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3161698#msg3161698 (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3161698#msg3161698)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=202360)

You can make acrylic nuts as in post#109
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3115248#msg3115248 (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3115248#msg3115248)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=197441)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235510)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235512)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235514)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235516)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ballscrewbob on Nov 30, 2017, 08:40 pm
I use a slightly smaller version of the computer motherboard nylon push through's (http://www.novoflex.in/PCBSupports.html) that have a thread on them.
You can get the board off if you want just by squeezing the tab on the push through spacers and they are super cheap.

The variations make mounting things a breeze



Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Nov 30, 2017, 08:53 pm
(http://www.novoflex.in/images/DoubleLockingStyle.jpg)

Those work quite well if there are no through hole components near by.

I find in a year or two the nylon/plastic they are made of becomes brittle.

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: ballscrewbob on Nov 30, 2017, 10:07 pm
I have some of the white self stick cable tie mounts here that are over 20 years old and work great alongside the large collection of even older computer standoffs.

Its not so much about age as quality.

If the white ones are not subject to UV they will last a very long time and if its going to get any UV then the black ones.
Same thing with cable ties and other electrical nylon / plastic hybrid parts.

Not poo pooing your method at all for custom items.
But for standard items then off the shelf every time.

Just try ensure my stuff is HDPE or similar as its almost indestructable






Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Nov 30, 2017, 10:22 pm
"Its not so much about age as quality."
I know how that feels ;)

I do use those standoff's for some projects.

I think heat might be a factor too, but with low power stuff, not much of an issue.

I was just thinking, a small diameter wooden or plastic dowel with a hole in the top and a tight fitting push in 2-56 screw might work as well.

Edit
Agree, the clear cable ties do not like UV.
.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Nov 30, 2017, 10:35 pm
Maybe a modified version of this would work too:

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d9/Dowels_001.jpg)



.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: westfw on Dec 01, 2017, 03:22 am
Quote
The Arduino designers made major mistakes in the placement of the mounting holes.
These were placed too close to headers etc.
Well, it was more like they added additional headers after the screw holes had already been fixed in place.  Go back to the duemilanove (or even the Uno V1), and there's plenty of room around the mounting holes.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: dougp on Dec 02, 2017, 06:20 pm
The Arduino designers made major mistakes in the placement of the mounting holes.
These were placed too close to headers etc.
I avoided that problem by cannabilizing a cheap plastic Arduino enclosure to use as the mount.  Too much trouble to try to keep four holes perfectly placed.  This way I only need two holes for the enclosure itself and there's play for slight adjustments.

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235779)

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235773)

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235775)

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235783)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Dec 03, 2017, 12:53 am
Maybe a modified version of this would work too:

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d9/Dowels_001.jpg)



.
I have used old biro tubes cut to length in the past , there is a bit of slop to allow some mis alignment betwen hand drilled holes as well.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Dec 03, 2017, 06:10 am
A few hints on making 'Infinity Mirrors'.
One ProMini, some code, 47 neopixels, acrylic frame and some woodworking skills can result in a nice gift idea (or 6).

(https://andrewcarr102.files.wordpress.com/2015/06/fq0toizhkvljxm2-medium.jpg)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235830)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235832)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235834)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235848)

https://www.tapplastics.com/product/plastics/cut_to_size_plastic/acrylic_sheets_mirror_clear/521 (https://www.tapplastics.com/product/plastics/cut_to_size_plastic/acrylic_sheets_mirror_clear/521)

https://www.tapplastics.com/product/plastics/cut_to_size_plastic/two_way_mirrored_acrylic/558 (https://www.tapplastics.com/product/plastics/cut_to_size_plastic/two_way_mirrored_acrylic/558)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Dec 03, 2017, 06:10 am
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235838)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235836)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235842)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235844)



Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Jiggy-Ninja on Dec 05, 2017, 09:38 pm
I made an infinity mirror with my sister, it was a lot of fun. Put it down on the floor and it just looks so weird. What I want to make next (one of a couple "above and beyond" enhancements of old projects I've done) is make an infinity digital clock with APA120s embedded into the mirror so I can do some color-fading effects with the time display and border LEDs.

The most ugly thing about most RGB LED strips is the discreteness of the individual LEDs. From a close enough distance, your eyes can clearly perceive the spacial difference between light spots. has anyone found a good tactic for diffusing individual SMD LEDs? I'm thinking of trying a very small blob of hot glue and seeing if that takes the edge off it. It's slightly translucent.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Dec 13, 2017, 06:03 am
Sometimes a simple tool will do just fine.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=237165)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=237167)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Dec 24, 2017, 11:01 pm
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=238381)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=238383)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=238385)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=238387)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: TomGeorge on Dec 24, 2017, 11:28 pm
Hi,  larryd.

Merry Christmas mate, ( 9:15am Christmas Morning here ) this thread has been great through the year, keep it up.

This week  I took delivery of 30   12 x 3 mm neodymium magnets, will check the Boxing Day specials for a suitable tin.

I gather the most suitable tin has to have had some decadent foodstuff that us type 2 diabetics aren't supposed to have.

The sacrifices we make.

Tom... :)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=238392)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: westfw on Dec 25, 2017, 12:15 am
Quote
[aunt alice's cookie tin...]
(http://starecat.com/content/wp-content/uploads/shrodingers-cookies-exist-as-both-cookies-and-sewing-supplies-until-you-open-the-can.jpg)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Dec 25, 2017, 12:59 am
Look out for a nice big rectangular one.

(https://secure.img2-ag.wfcdn.com/im/50180739/resize-h400-w400%5Ecompr-r85/2929/29293540/christmas-tree-cookie-tin.jpg)



Still not Christmas day here yet.  :)

.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 03, 2018, 05:49 am
I have been fighting with intermittent charging on our iPads.
Tried several commercially available USB 6' extension cables to keep the iPads plugged in while we use the devices.
Because of the IR drop in the cables, the iPad charging circuit often rejected the incoming voltage levels and would disconnect the units from the chargers.
Out of frustration I made my own 6-foot extension cable with #18 AWG power wires.

Problem solved.

50 male connectors for $6.50
https://www.ebay.ca/itm/321580225851 (https://www.ebay.ca/itm/321580225851)
50 female connectors for $6.12
https://www.ebay.ca/itm/50PCS-USB-2-0-Type-A-Plug-4-pin-Female-Adapter-Connector-jack-Plastic-Cover/321580308336?hash=item4adfae1770:g:FhcAAOSw43haLjXT (https://www.ebay.ca/itm/50PCS-USB-2-0-Type-A-Plug-4-pin-Female-Adapter-Connector-jack-Plastic-Cover/321580308336?hash=item4adfae1770:g:FhcAAOSw43haLjXT)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=239545)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=239547)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=239549)


(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=239551)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 03, 2018, 05:49 am
#18 AWG silicone insulation. 20M for ~$10.00
https://www.ebay.ca/itm/20M-Flexible-Stranded-Silicone-Rubber-Wire-Cable-18AWG-Gauge-OD-2-3mm-Black-BS5/172742253627?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649 (https://www.ebay.ca/itm/20M-Flexible-Stranded-Silicone-Rubber-Wire-Cable-18AWG-Gauge-OD-2-3mm-Black-BS5/172742253627?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=239553)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=239555)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=239557)


Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: GreyArea on Jan 03, 2018, 08:36 am
Mentioned this in the 'Bar Sport forum'

https://www.banggood.com/MECHANIC-2-in-1-Double-deck-Multi-function-Silicone-Mat-Pad-Maintenance-Platform-BGA-Work-Station-p-1159929.html?rmmds=search (https://www.banggood.com/MECHANIC-2-in-1-Double-deck-Multi-function-Silicone-Mat-Pad-Maintenance-Platform-BGA-Work-Station-p-1159929.html?rmmds=search)

This makes a great addition to your work bench.
There are several versions available on eBay.
This version is made up of 2 silicone mats.

This is the first time I've read a 29 page thread from start to finish.

Because I'm using it at the moment, I just thought I'd mention...you can buy your own silicone casting resin. This tray looks so simple that you could cut whatever shapes you need from suitable gauge ldpe to make your mould, flood it with the resin and hey presto, you've made your own bespoke work tray.

Hint...make sure the base is a generous 3mm at thinnest point. Some of the silicones don't cure reliably if much thinner.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: GreyArea on Jan 03, 2018, 08:53 am
The most ugly thing about most RGB LED strips is the discreteness of the individual LEDs. From a close enough distance, your eyes can clearly perceive the spacial difference between light spots. has anyone found a good tactic for diffusing individual SMD LEDs? I'm thinking of trying a very small blob of hot glue and seeing if that takes the edge off it. It's slightly translucent.
Distance.

That's what I've found makes most difference. A piece of 3mm opaque acrylic placed directly on a strip of LEDs leaves them as defined point sources.

Raise the same sheet about 2cm from them and you get perfect soft diffusion.

What you sacrifice is illumination; if you just want to "see" the LEDs themselves, it's fine. If you're using the LEDs to see something else, not so much.

Materials I've found that work well;

Opaque acrylic (normally specifies light transmission which not many materials do - 30% seems commonly available in the UK)
80 gsm fibre glass weave - not tried embedded in resin yet, but even 8 layers "dry" allows good transmission
40mm white plumbing pipe...like the waste pipe on your bathroom sink...glows surprisingly well!

Might post some pics later.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: GreyArea on Jan 03, 2018, 09:19 pm
Pics (videos, actually) of different LED diffusion materials as promised;

5mm opaque acrylic;

@ zero clearance from LEDs;
https://youtu.be/ZxgqMy8Mu58

@ ~10mm;
https://youtu.be/tfc87paQai0

@ ~25mm;
https://youtu.be/6LqwBQm80P0

40mm diameter white plumbing pipe;
https://youtu.be/4TMwGAQ2pXE

80gsm fibre glass (8layers, 0mm clearance);
https://youtu.be/n-4TGhghPQo

@ ~25mm clearance;
https://youtu.be/y-AvcSwlwQo

Edit: latest materials only arrived today...fibre glass tubes...narrow gauge one is about a 2 mm wall, 30 mm diameter tube, wider one is maybe 1mm wall, 35mm diameter. Even where they overlap there is still light transmission.

https://youtu.be/qnQy1M1Z--o

Only very short videos but I think really show how much a bit of clearance helps soften the effect.

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Jan 03, 2018, 11:56 pm



[/quote]
I have been fighting with intermittent charging on our iPads.

I have problems with an ipad 3 .
The connector seems to be the problem not the lead..
It does not seem to fully fit in the socket as it used to.
Some leads work better than others, not sure why.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on Jan 04, 2018, 01:08 am
Quote
The connector seems to be the problem not the lead..
It does not seem to fully fit in the socket as it used to
My Iphone stopped charging; I was about to junk it.

Using my magnifier glasses  I looked at my 'dead' Iphone. I found a funny piece of debris inside the Iphone charger cable socket on the bottom of the Iphone.  Removed with a needle. It WORKS!

So look very closely at the cable and the Ixxx socket.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: MAS3 on Jan 05, 2018, 01:06 am
Wow terryking228, don't forget the disclaimer and warning to first unplug the charger from the socket, and to wait a while so the capacitors get some time to discharge a bit. :P
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: terryking228 on Jan 05, 2018, 01:13 am
Hi,
Quote
first unplug the charger from the socket
I updated the above post to try to make it clear I was looking at the 'dead' Iphone, not the charger..
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: westfw on Jan 05, 2018, 07:36 am
Apparently the charger port of an iPhone is on a separate PCB, and can be replaced "relatively easily" (depending on model, I guess.  I was looking at a 5s.)  (about the same difficulty as replacing the battery.)
https://www.imore.com/how-fix-broken-charge-port-iphone-5 (https://www.imore.com/how-fix-broken-charge-port-iphone-5)

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Boardburner2 on Jan 08, 2018, 06:02 am
Using my magnifier glasses  I looked at my 'dead' Iphone. I found a funny piece of debris inside the Iphone charger cable socket on the bottom of the Iphone.  Removed with a needle. It WORKS!

I had exacly the same previously.

I wonder if poking it with a needle caused damage.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Henry_Best on Jan 17, 2018, 03:07 am
Some breadboard stuff.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=223241)
When making connectors like this, I always include a key pin so that it's impossible to connect them the wrong way round. For this one, I would use seven pins, snip off pin 2 and force it into the connector at position 2, which has no wire connected to it. I recently released the smoke in a 2.5" IDE hard drive by connecting it the wrong way round!
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Henry_Best on Jan 17, 2018, 03:23 am
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=228763)
Easier and cheaper, to protect the teeth are these.
Binding strips (http://"https://www.colbrookbinding.com/document-binding/slide-binding-bars/?gclid=CjwKCAiA4vbSBRBNEiwAMorER0xFFWPT_g1ASSl4I5mPfKbbQgM1Wd2vI57fkW6KWa7KAWr8Tv8VthoCJXkQAvD_BwE")
Easily cut to length by the saw itself and no clips needed.
Your local stationers probably sell them individually.
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 17, 2018, 03:26 am
Good idea!
(https://www.colbrookbinding.com/image/products/slidebind.jpg)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: Watcher on Jan 17, 2018, 09:23 pm
When making connectors like this, I always include a key pin so that it's impossible to connect them the wrong way round. For this one, I would use seven pins, snip off pin 2 and force it into the connector at position 2, which has no wire connected to it. I recently released the smoke in a 2.5" IDE hard drive by connecting it the wrong way round!
How is that printed label on the connector housing  made ? (Post #444)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 17, 2018, 09:34 pm
I printed it on a full page label using an ink jet printer.

I laminated it with clear packing tape then cut it to size.

See the ZIP file (WORD) and PDF attachments below.

MD5 for ZIP file is   8DFBED52BD713026C776B4490838C00C

Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: JedidiahStolzfus on Jan 19, 2018, 05:01 am
Arduino Pro Mini interface board.  Plugs directly into the bus lines of the breadboard, and has both male and female headers along the side.

(https://i0.wp.com/www.jedidiahstolzfus.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/P1050723.jpg?resize=1038%2C576) (http://www.jedidiahstolzfus.com/arduino-mini-breadboard-helper/)

ESP-01 Programming board with integrated 3.3v regulator and easy access to the GPIO pins as well as a header for connecting an FTDI board.  Not my best work, but it's functional, and it was about 20F in the workshop when I put it together.

(https://i0.wp.com/www.jedidiahstolzfus.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/ESP-01.jpg?resize=1038%2C576) (http://www.jedidiahstolzfus.com/8266-esp-01-programming-prototyping-board/)
Title: Re: Share tips you have come across
Post by: larryd on Jan 19, 2018, 05:13 am
If you have a tight fitting head on the screw, you can cut it down with a file and a electric drill.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=235514)


To protect the threads, thread the screw into a standoff.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=241836)