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Topic: How to connect WS2811 5050 RGB LED Strip to Arduino/Genuino Uno? (Read 11851 times) previous topic - next topic

pepefest

Profwombat - did you ever manage to get this to work ?

Profwombat


KEVINJUDE

Hi all, i am new here, can i know what is the full programming codes to control WS2811 12V RGB LED Strip for running light 3 by 3 ?

cartwrig

No one mentioned this; but, since you're discussing WS2811.  That strip is 12VDC.  The Arduino's Digital Outputs are only +5VDC.  I'm thinking you would need to up convert the DIO's voltage to 12VDC, by using the 5VDC to drive an optocoupler, such as this:

https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/159694/n-channel-mosfet-as-12-vdc-switch

PaulRB

That strip is 12VDC.  The Arduino's Digital Outputs are only +5VDC.  I'm thinking you would need to up convert the DIO's voltage to 12VDC, by using the 5VDC to drive an optocoupler,
No, the strip is powered by 12V but it's data line requires a 5V or 3.3V signal.

If you apply 12V to the data line, you may damage it.

megabri

Hi, I had same problem at beginning... and finally I notice that I had connected the DATA from Arduino to the Dout pin of the Led Strip, instead to Din pin.
That solve my problem.

Have a nice day

moJoeRedRog

I have connected everything as shown in the images (sorry, they failed to upload).

use photobucket.com there host photos for free and they are so easy to put into messages

frankvnz

No, the strip is powered by 12V but it's data line requires a 5V or 3.3V signal.
I know it's been a while, but... how sure are you of this? I'm struggling with this same problem. I don't think that 3.3V is enough. But maybe 5V?

PaulRB

I don't think that 3.3V is enough. But maybe 5V?
During a recent project, I also found that 3.3V data signal was not reliable with ws2811. There was considerable loss of data.

I tried using 1 channel of a 4 channel logic level convertor module to increase the 3.3V signal to 5V. This was much better, but still there was occasional data loss, and the circuit was not stable, for example touching the logic convertor module resulted in more data loss.

grumpy_mike suggested using a 74hc14. This chip contains 6 inverter gates with Schmitt trigger inputs. Two gates should be connected in series, and the chip powered by 5V. With this, there is no data loss or instability.

Paul__B

grumpy_mike suggested using a 74hc14.
As would I.

Strictly speaking, 3.3 V is running a bit close to the maximum threshold voltage, though the "typical" is quite comfortable.

a 74HCT14 would be perfect - this is after all, exactly what its purpose is.  

cartwrig

No, the strip is powered by 12V but it's data line requires a 5V or 3.3V signal.

If you apply 12V to the data line, you may damage it.
Paul,

Sorry, I haven't been on the Arduino Forum in a while!  :-)

I'm used to using WS2812 LED Strip, which has a supply voltage of 5VDC and a DIN (data-in) voltage of 5VDC.  But, the documentation for WS2811 LED Strip specifically calls for a supply voltage of 12VDC, as everyone has been talking about in this 3 pages of forum thread.  AND, the data sheet specs VDD +/- 0.5VDC (again VDD = 12VDC), so that would be a data input voltage requirement of from:  11.5VDC to 12.5VDC. 

Feel free to refer to the WS2811 integrated circuit's data sheet, here:  https://cdn-shop.adafruit.com/datasheets/WS2811.pdf .

So, trying to drive WS2811 LED's directly with an Arduino would indeed require a step-up circuit, as I talked about above.   

I hope this helps!

Thanks,
- Rob

PS:  In the end, I'd probably recommend simply rebuying, and getting some WS2812 or WS2812b LED Strip!  It will make everyone's efforts so much simpler.  However, I'm all about learning with whatever one has already purchased!  Because, you'll get something operating, and learn some great circuit design concepts in the process!

Happy electronic-ing!

frankvnz

But, the documentation for WS2811 LED Strip specifically calls for a supply voltage of 12VDC, as everyone has been talking about in this 3 pages of forum thread.  AND, the data sheet specs VDD +/- 0.5VDC (again VDD = 12VDC), so that would be a data input voltage requirement of from:  11.5VDC to 12.5VDC. 
Not true!

The datasheet says (Page 2, Absolute Maximum Ratings table) the *maximum* value for VDD is +6.0~+7.0V.
Page 5, under the 12V supply diagram, says there's 2.7K resistor as a voltage divider to reduce the 12V supply to 5V VDD at the chip. From page 2, the maximum value of VI is VDD +/- 0.5VDC. The switching voltages (page 3, Electrical Characteristics) are VIL = 0.3VDD and VIH = 0.7VDD (1.5V and 3.5V respectively) so a 5V Arduino (e.g. Mega or Uno) can control them successfully, but a 3.3V Arduino (e.g. Nano or ESP8266) cannot.

PaulRB

Thanks, franknvz, I believe your calculations are correct.

Although I've never come across a 3.3V Nano, they have all been 5V. You can get 3.3V Pro Mini (as well as 5V), maybe that's what you were thinking of

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