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Topic: advice please - Device to track how a delivery company handles our parcels (Read 988 times) previous topic - next topic

jago2

Not to be argumentative, but exactly how do you know that?

I would offer that if the packaging is good, there would be no broken shipments.
the greater the transportation hazzards, the greater the packaging has to be.

There's a difference between good and bullet proof. The packaging costs have to be proportionate to the goods shipped. We could use fully protected styrofoam packaging (not that we would for environment reasons) and reduce breakages overnight, but it simply costs too much for what we sell.

Our packaging has been approved and tested by QA at the depot. It's good enough. Some will always break, that's a fact of life. We don't expect 0% breakages. But we don't expect 5% either.


dave-in-nj

There's a difference between good and bullet proof. The packaging costs have to be proportionate to the goods shipped. We could use fully protected styrofoam packaging (not that we would for environment reasons) and reduce breakages overnight, but it simply costs too much for what we sell.

Our packaging has been approved and tested by QA at the depot. It's good enough. Some will always break, that's a fact of life. We don't expect 0% breakages. But we don't expect 5% either.


once you have the hard data of what occurs during transport, the solution will be evident.
I think you are on the right track by using an Arduino to monitor a few packages with a plethora of sensors.   if you can decrease breakage by a simple adjustment, then the costs are well worth the investigation.
There is an old saying that it takes 90% of the time to complete 90% of the project and another 90% of the time to complete 90% of the remaining, and another 90% of the time to complete 90% of what is left and another..........
you are in a similar situation, you figured out how to save 90%... 
to save 90% of the remainder, you need to do  X
but until you know the requirements, all is just guessing and often people just throw $$$$ to reach an acceptable result and never figure it out.

Boardburner2

I am not sure this data would be useful though.

Even if you can pinpoint the problem area would the courrier do anything about it.
Hand sorting happens sometimes using part time staff.

Do you get increased breakage during the christmas period ??

Boardburner2

Because we've been using it for many years with many couriers, including our last one that we had for several years. .
I have noticed in recent years an upsurge in self employed drivers for final delivery , likes of amazon etc.
I wonder if that is the problem.

Robin2

Quote
Not to be argumentative, but exactly how do you know that?
Because we've been using it for many years with many couriers, including our last one that we had for several years. And the QA guy at our depot has personally visited us a number of times, checked it, watched us pack etc.
This suggests fairly clearly that the problem rests with the cheaper courier you are using.

So the question you have to face is whether the savings (compared to your previous courier) offset the cost and inconvenience of the breakages.

I know you said earlier "you get what you pay for but you also have to be able to pay for it" - but maybe you have simply got to the unacceptable bottom?

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

dave-in-nj

I am not sure this data would be useful though.

Even if you can pinpoint the problem area would the courrier do anything about it.
Hand sorting happens sometimes using part time staff.
the point is that there are multiple forces at work.
held at 4 ft and dropped so it would impact flat is one force
held at 4 ft on the side and impact flat is another force and would require different packaging to protect
held at a 45deg and impact on a corner would be yet another wild guess of what is happening in the actual journey from shipping to delivery.
if half of the impacts are from flat bottom, then a single layer of bubble wrap on the bottom could reduce damage by 50%.
if half the impacts are flat sided, then 4 walls of bubble wrap might reduce breakage by 50%.
of course the idea you could just put a double wrap around the whole thing and eliminate breakage is possible as well.  but the larger box and added protection is costs that may not be needed.
Also, if you find out that your pick-up driver is causing 100% of your breakage and after it leaves that first terminal, there is zero breakage....  
we can go on taking wild guesses.

dave-in-nj

Because we've been using it for many years with many couriers, including our last one that we had for several years. And the QA guy at our depot has personally visited us a number of times, checked it, watched us pack etc.

This suggests fairly clearly that the problem rests with the cheaper courier you are using.

So the question you have to face is whether the savings (compared to your previous courier) offset the cost and inconvenience of the breakages.

I know you said earlier "you get what you pay for but you also have to be able to pay for it" - but maybe you have simply got to the unacceptable bottom?

...R
kind of like :

you can use the older carrier
you can add more protective packaging.


pick one ?

aarg

Because we've been using it for many years with many couriers, including our last one that we had for several years. And the QA guy at our depot has personally visited us a number of times, checked it, watched us pack etc.
Then the onus is on them to fix it.
  ... with a transistor and a large sum of money to spend ...
Please don't PM me with technical questions. Post them in the forum.

Boardburner2

So the question you have to face is whether the savings (compared to your previous courier) offset the cost and inconvenience of the breakages.

I know you said earlier "you get what you pay for but you also have to be able to pay for it" - but maybe you have simply got to the unacceptable bottom?

...R
I think you have it.

I mentioned earlier a 20% breakage rate ,That was for vacuum solar tubes.
At that point we gave up as costs were too high for us to be competitive.

They travel fine on pallets but when broken down into indvidual manufacturers packets breakage became unacceptable.

There were other reasons as well but that was the final decider.


Boardburner2

Anecdotally when we looked at packing solutions i was told of a seller of stem glasses (champagne).

Too many breakages so they tried thicker bubble wrap or whatever and the problem got worse.
Turned out the problem was 'stiction' between the wrap and the glass.
Went back to the old packing and wrapped the glass in a layer of tissue paper first.
Solved the problem.

I doubt that changing courier behaviour is the answer.
Daveinnj is right i think it is about what works now with the delivery companies.
Unless you ha

pert

I do notice an increase in problems with the glass I mail out around Christmas. The breakage goes up to maybe 0.5%, from 0.1% the rest of the year so really not much of a concern. The most difficult to ship product is the didgeridoos, which are a 5 ft long glass tube. I double box them and can ship them all the way across the country without problems but it's the only product I disable international shipping on because that seems like it would be asking for trouble. On all my other products I've actually been reducing my shipping box sizes and the amount of padding because the breakage rate is so low. I was much more paranoid about it when I first started doing online sales.

I haven't ever shipped palettes but I frequently receive them and that's actually where I see the worst breakage. I think the culprit is the forklifts.

The bigger problem for me is the packages that either get misdelivered or stolen. That goes way up around Christmas. It ends up being time consuming to deal with the customer and the postal service trying to figure out if it can be recovered before I have to resort to giving a refund. USPS refuses to take any responsibility even when their geotracking shows the package was delivered to the wrong address.

Boardburner2

USPS refuses to take any responsibility even when their geotracking shows the package was delivered to the wrong address.
OH YES.

I had this with another international carrier, 3 weeks later had a demand from said carrier for customs duty and vat.

I did not receive it but had to pay tax despite not having it.

Got quite unpleasant.

With UK postie i have to pay first to collect and can refuse delivery.

Boardburner2

Daveinnj is right i think it is about what works now with the delivery companies.
Unless you ha
New batteries again.  >:(

Unless you have the skills to convert your accelerometer results to new packaging methods this could be an expensive proposition.
I do not know much about packaging but if you have an existing business that knows about this , possibly.

If for instance you are shipping wine bottles i doubt you are the only victim of deteriorating courrier methods.
I would expect packaging manufacturers to be aware of this and have a solution.
Albeit at a cost.

dave-in-nj

I re-read the first post.
we can help with Aruino stuff. selecting and setting up circuits, etc.
some factory floor testing to make sure the results are as expected.

in case you did not know, I am in NJ, in the USA.

if you need to test a shipment, I would be happy to photograph what is received and re-label the package for return shipment.


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