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Topic: 4duino pro uno and power supply (Read 574 times) previous topic - next topic

Johan_Ha

I bought a 4duino pro uno today. It should be compatible with Arduino Uno, but it has some extras. Mainly a built in motor driver for two dc motors. But I have a very hard time finding a thorough datasheet or guide for the board, which makes me believe that the manufacture takes things for granted. There's a jumper switch for selecting either VDC or VIN for the power source. And there's a mention about 11 V 1.5 A max power for the motors (pretty cool, or hot actually). The VDC stands for the standard round socket that a normal Uno also has. VIN is a screw terminal. Can I assume that these two power inputs are identical? Both go to the same regulator? Both go unregulated to the built in motor driver? Am I also supposed to assume that the 11 V only goes to the DC motor driver, but nowhere else? So if I want to power several servos, say with 9 V, I need to have them powered say from my battery pack.

I have a sensor shield for my standard Uno. This 4duino has kind of the sensor shield built in, namely a nice row of ground, voltage and signal pins for digital pins 0 to 13, just waiting for a servo socket to be connected to them. But the voltage pin is only the regulated 5 V, right? Barely enough amperes for 1 or 2 servos?
____________________

If you ask for help and write 'u' instead of 'you' because you think it's convenient, I will write 'no' instead of 'yes'. For same reasons.

TonyWilk

I bought a 4duino pro uno today. It should be compatible with Arduino Uno, but it has some extras.
Really shabby website there, no hint of pinout or schematics... see if you can contact 'em and get a schematic.

Having to guess and maybe damage 16quid's worth of board just because the supplier can't give you the data is just not acceptable.

Yours,
 TonyWilk

Johan_Ha

Here's some more info.


Quote
In addition we have added colour-coded GVS headers for all the I/O pins including the additional 2 analog pins, A6 and A7. Note that these additional analog pins are analog ONLY - there is no ability to do a digital read or write on them and there is no ability to set pullup resistors.
What does that mean? Are they "truly" analog in the sense that they don't output 50% PWM, but actually 2.5 V? And if one would output highest analog value, wouldn't a receiving device, which expects digital, read it as digital HIGH?
____________________

If you ask for help and write 'u' instead of 'you' because you think it's convenient, I will write 'no' instead of 'yes'. For same reasons.

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