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Topic: New STM32 STAR Otto Arduino Board (Read 10091 times) previous topic - next topic

bobcousins

Latest rumor is that "board is in production; will be available end of April". No word on pricing.

Please ask questions in the forum so everyone can benefit. PM me for paid work.

luca_p

Anyway, who releases this kind of crap? No new.cpp

Code: [Select]
void setup()
{
  char* p;
  p = new char(10);
  delete [] p;
}


Code: [Select]

otto.ino.cpp:(.text._Z5setupv+0x4): warning: undefined reference to `operator new(unsigned int)'

otto.ino.cpp:(.text._Z5setupv+0x10): warning: undefined reference to `operator delete[](void*)'


Rushed and unsupported, but version 1.0.1

xinfinite

And... where can I buy some OTTO's  :)

bobcousins

Latest rumor is that "board is in production; will be available end of April". No word on pricing.
Well, now end of May, still no launch, but a lucky few have bought one at the Maker Faire.

I wonder if this will go the way of the Tre...
Please ask questions in the forum so everyone can benefit. PM me for paid work.

pjrc

I wonder if Musto leaving will have any impact on Star Otto and other unreleased stuff from the Arduino.org side?

https://blog.arduino.cc/2017/07/28/a-new-era-for-arduino-begins-today/

pjrc

Looks like all Arduino.org pages now redirect to Arduino.cc.

No sign of Star Otto or Primo anymore....

xinfinite

That's a shame! I really longing for something like STAR OTTO. A lot stronger then the MEGA.
Come on Arduino: give us the STAR OTTO  :'(

pjrc

#22
Sep 02, 2017, 03:10 pm Last Edit: Sep 02, 2017, 03:18 pm by pjrc
FWIW, 2018 is likely to bring Cortex-M7 microcontrollers at 400 & 600 MHz...

M7 is pretty incredible.  It has 2 integer execution units, so sometimes it can get 2 instructions per clock.  The FPU has both 32 bit float and 64 bit double.  M7 also has branch prediction, so many branches that currently take 3 cycles in M3 & M4 become single cycle if predicted correctly.

M4 at "only" 180 MHz on Star Otto and Teensy 3.6 is going to look kinda sluggish by comparison.

selfonlypath

#23
Sep 02, 2017, 03:27 pm Last Edit: Sep 03, 2017, 05:55 am by selfonlypath
Do you mean arduino will produce a new board based on Cortex M7 and if yes, what manufacturer (Atmel, ST...) ?

KevinA

Technically it looks great, but what sort of corporate morons release a non-Open Source board into an Open Source ecosystem?

ST clearly have no clue about Open Source, and I'm not sure about Arduino Srl either. Let's hope it gets some cheap clones.
What do you mean by 'Non-Open Source'?
Every one of STM development boards have documentation including the PCB design files.

pjrc

Many months ago, when Bob wrote those words, Arduino.org's page had changed from "coming soon" to showing the Star Otto as released.  The web pages didn't have the schematic back then.  I don't know if I would agree with the "corporate morons" sentiment, but at least at the time Bob wrote those words, their web page did say Star Otto was released (it wasn't) and no design files were present.

But Arduino.org did publish the schematic and other design info a short while later.  I remember, because I spent a few hours looking over the schematic and the ST chip's pinouts, trying to figure out if they had exposed the pins necessary to make a Ethernet PHY shield and a ULPI USB shield.

Whether Star Otto ever fully met the open source hardware definition is a good question.  Phil Torrone of Adafruit claimed it didn't.  He posted several messages on mail lists to call out Musto and Arduino.org.  While he probably was correct, it really looked to me like a technicality.  Arduino.org did publish the full schematic in PDF, and other files I didn't try to open.

Except for a handful of "lite version" at the San Mateo Maker Faire (lacking the LCD, audio and SDRAM), it doesn't look like they ever actually sold any Star Otto boards.

ODwyerPW

I too was looking at an Otto like board and also was disappointed they didn't bring out the Ethernet to an RJ45 header on the board.

Atmel has the ATSAME70Q21 chip (look at the specs... it's awesome) . It will be interesting to see if folks pursue dev boards with it. it runs at 300Mhz. Doesn't have an on-chip MIPI DSI interface like 32-bit STM32F469 MCU that the Otto was to use. If Atmel could add that type of functionality to the great stuff that the ATSAME70Q21 already has.... that would be awesome.
Quiero una vida simple en Mexico...nada mas.

westfw

Adafruit seems to be enthusiastic about the new Atmel SAMD5x chips.  Somewhat similar to the samd21 boards out now, but with CM4F CPU, faster clocks, and more memory.  It sounds pretty sweet, and would permit both uno and mega sized boards...

Otoh, arduino.cc and Atmel have had a relationship for a while now;  one of the nice things about the Otto and primo was bringing in some new vendors...

So Paul- your little boot chip that loads code onto Freescale arm chips- would it work with other vendors chips as well?

pjrc

So Paul- your little boot chip that loads code onto Freescale arm chips- would it work with other vendors chips as well?
Nope, definitely won't work on any non-Freescale chip.  Even on the Freescale chips, it only works with a pretty narrow subset having the same flash memory configuration.  Like most bootloaders, it's pretty tightly tied to specific hardware.

But the bootloader currently used for Arduino Zero probably can be used with minimal modification.  The SAMD50 looks like it's mostly register compatible with SAMD21.  Many of the peripherals seem to have extra registers, mostly for use with DMA.  The timers appear to be a little different, but mostly the same stuff arranged differently to accommodate newer modes while still supporting the old ones.

This backwards compatibility with SAMD20 is almost certainly why Adafruit is so interested.  They're probably feeling pretty cramped with Python.  But they know how much engineering time is needed to switch to another chip with all different peripherals.

SAMD50 has several new peripherals that look pretty amazing.  It'll be interesting to see if anyone really makes effective use of the 4 bit SDIO controller with the Arduino SD library.  We've had this on Teensy 3.5 & 3.6 for about a year.  So far, we're mostly using it to just speed up the SD library as-is, still fetching 1 sector at a time, still all done in the code from user function calls.  To really leverage the speed of modern cards, you really have to implement substantial caching in RAM and use multi-sector transfers, ideally done asynchronously with DMA while the rest of the user's program runs.  That's on my bucket list...  So far, there's been little interest from anyone else in the Arduino world.  Maybe with SAMD20 now having this hardware and enough RAM, Arduino might finally want to implement a higher performance SD library?

westfw

Quote
Quote
your little boot chip that loads code onto Freescale arm chips- would it work with other vendors chips as well?
Nope, definitely won't work on any non-Freescale chip.  Even on the Freescale chips, it only works with a pretty narrow subset having the same flash memory configuration.  Like most bootloaders, it's pretty tightly tied to specific hardware.
I was under the impression that the teensy3 bootload chip used jtag (or maybe something proprietary to freescale) to load bootloader code into the Main ARM chips RAM, and then runs that to do the actual loading over usb, and was wondering if that first part (load from BLchip to RAM and execute) was relatively not-freescale specific.  (I could be entirely wrong, of course, since I'm just analyzing the schematic...)

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