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Topic: Standalone serial transmission without arduino (Read 254 times) previous topic - next topic

Amrut

Apr 15, 2017, 09:43 am Last Edit: Apr 15, 2017, 09:53 am by Amrut
Hello Guys,

I am building a remote control system, in which the receiver is an arduino and all of receiver part function is controlled by it.
In transmitter part, I want to transmit an 8-bit  decoder parallel output Serially in a TX-RX channel. I can use a PISO (parallel-in-serial-out) register to convert them in serial data and another arduino to transmit the data in a baud rate of 9600bps.

My question is how can I use a UART IC (PC1655D ) to send the data instead of using an arduino.

datasheet :http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/pc16550d.pdf

westfw

What "system" is your 16550 on?  That's a standard PC-class UART and you usually access it with filesystem calls from the operating system.  (Using shift registers would be difficult; you'd need extra bits to handle the start and stop bits.)
(The 16550 is also a process-oriented uart, so it's not well-suited to just connecting up to 8 digitial outputs from some other device; you need a processor in there.  I think you can still get A HD-6402 standalone UART, which might be closer to what you had in mind...  (but you'll also need a clock))

(Heh.  my first project after I graduated from college used two 6402 uarts (from Jameco, even!) to convert 6bit 150bps  (?) newswire data to 8bit 300bps data that our mainframe could understand.   1981...  Good times!)


Amrut

#2
Apr 17, 2017, 02:35 pm Last Edit: Apr 17, 2017, 02:40 pm by Amrut
 I was wondering why aren't there many DIP UART ICs. Now I know that most of them are process oriented i.e. used along with Processors.
The 6404 ic is also an uart  (40 pins and I dont need reciver part).

I thought of using  Encoder and decoder pair HT12E and HT12D, but i dont know how to implement 8 bit data with two start and stop bits. (about parity, i am not sure).

Is there any way to use encoder and decoders?
( for minimal circuit and like uart standard serial transmission)

westfw

Quote
I was wondering why aren't there many DIP UART ICs.
Also...  These days a microcontroller is cheaper and easier to use.  You could stick another Arduino at the transmitter, and easily transmit up to 18 bits of parallel data over its uart.  A Nano clone, or a "bare" ATmegaxx8 is probably smaller, cheaper, and easier to wire than one of the old 40pin UARTs and associated circuitry.


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