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Topic: Arduino and Money (Read 3484 times) previous topic - next topic

Henry_Best

I like your thinking, it is just about good BASS fishing weather again, maybe I can make my millions adapting Arduino to that somehow....

here fishy fishy fishy......

Pic Attached.
Fish and chips?

Robin2

Both AVR and PIC  ....
Sorry. I was just trying to have some fun with the word "lure"

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Boardburner2

. My money is on AVR to be the last chip standing, but who knows the future plans of Microchip for the two, "competing" product lines?


Used to use PIC quite a lot.

Thing about AVR for me is that the forum has a much better 'feel' to it than the microchip forum.

birddog

I have had these ideas, but have failed to get any investors behind them.  Feel free to implement them if you can.  I will not seek royalties.


  PLUS      =   Automatic shaver


   PLUS      =   You get the idea



It's a reference to an episode of South Park. 
You mean an Arduino is "about tree-fiddy"?

Henry_Best

I have had these ideas, but have failed to get any investors behind them.  Feel free to implement them if you can.  I will not seek royalties.


  PLUS     =   Automatic shaver


  PLUS     =   You get the idea
I won't be volunteering to beta test either of those.

larryd

What happens if the two get integrated? ???


.
No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

westfw


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Both AVR and PIC serve the education and hobby markets. The hobby market is dominated by AVR
This is a relatively recent phenomena.  Pre-Arduino, the hobby market was dominated by PICs (and obsolete PICs at that), and the "easy" hobbyist market targeted by Arduino was probably dominated by "The BASIC Stamp" from Parallax.  A bit before that (and occasionally since Arduino), Atmel AVRs were difficult to obtain from hobbyist-friendly dealers, and many of the semi-pro dealers (digikey/etc) didn't carry them.  Usually programmed in Assembly Language; I remember ordering some ATmega48s as my AVRs with "lots of flash space" - the usual candidates with A90S2313 with 2k...  (although - I notice that my perception of "relatively recent" is stretching out as I get older.  Have I really been doing Arduino Stuff for a decade, now?  Ouch!)


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while education splits them about evenly: microprocessor courses taught in computer science or business departments most often use PIC.
(microprocessor courses in business departments???!!!)
Microprocessor courses are relatively rare in general. :-(  I'm not sure you can derive meaningful statistics.

Quote
All the growth seems to be 'vertically', away from 8 bit processors.
Indeed.  PIC32 has more Arduino stuff than AVR32, but ARM is winning out.
Some part of me is half-expecting PIC and AVR to both die out as "odd proprietary architectures", leaving behind a bunch of 8051 derivatives for the 8bit crowd, and everyone else moved to ARM/etc.  (8051 and ARM both being architectures supported by "many" vendors.)


Robin2

Some part of me is half-expecting PIC and AVR to both die out as "odd proprietary architectures", leaving behind a bunch of 8051 derivatives for the 8bit crowd, and everyone else moved to ARM/etc.  (8051 and ARM both being architectures supported by "many" vendors.)
Should I buy in another 20 Atmega 328s and a few Attiny's to see me out?

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

westfw

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Should I buy in another 20 Atmega 328s and a few Attiny's to see me out?
I dunno.  Wanna buy some AT90S1200 chips that I bought back close to when they first showed up as purchasable?
Or some Tiny11s.  I've got a bunch of them; they were (briefly) only $0.25 each!


ChrisTenone

Sorry. I was just trying to have some fun with the word "lure"

...R
Fun with lures pretty much defines my pedagogical style. ;)
Wubba lubba dub dub!

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