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Topic: Share tips you have come across (Read 50467 times) previous topic - next topic

larryd

#15
Jan 08, 2017, 11:27 pm Last Edit: Jan 09, 2017, 12:42 am by LarryD
For projects requiring motor mounting or to temporarily mounting other components to prove a design, consider using copper clad PCB material. 
This material is: very strong, easily drilled, filed, hole punched and cut.
It solders well and conducts electricity.
Common thicknesses of copper clad board are 1/32 1/16 and 1/8".

It does oxidize :(










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The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

TomGeorge

Hi,
Spray lacquer on the front and look really good bit of retro.

Tom.... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

larryd

Yes spray lacquer does work nicely.

When you need to solder a small PCB on one of the panels it gets a real mess with the lacquer .


This is the second time I built this unit as the old one looked like hell after 2 years of soldering.

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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#18
Jan 11, 2017, 07:06 am Last Edit: Jan 11, 2017, 07:40 am by LarryD
Use an old heavy coffee cup to hold your small hand tools.



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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

terryking228

#19
Jan 11, 2017, 09:24 am Last Edit: Jan 11, 2017, 09:25 am by terryking228
WOW. I gotta catch up on these!!

This all points out that mechanical stuff like mounting and connecting devices and acquiring and using tools is one of the hardest things, especially for newbies. 

I've spend more time and effort on the mechanical considerations of This Project than I have on code.  SO FAR..
Regards, Terry King terry@yourduino.com  - Check great prices, devices and Arduino-related boards at http://YourDuino.com
HOW-TO: http://ArduinoInfo.Info

larryd

#20
Jan 13, 2017, 04:00 am Last Edit: Jan 13, 2017, 04:02 am by LarryD
No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

Sealing plastic bags.

Anti static bags.
Take your least used (crappiest) soldering iron tip, adjust temperature to 500'C, clean tip.
Lay a bag (to be sealed) on a flat surface with a silicone baking sheet under the bag.
Place a metal ruler at the point of required sealing.
Draw the iron tip at ~1 second per inch along the straight edge.

For zip lock freezer bags, turn the temperature down to ~400'C.

You will have to experiment with speed for your conditions.
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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#22
Jan 15, 2017, 01:46 am Last Edit: Jan 23, 2017, 02:34 am by LarryD
No measuring.
Making inserts, panels etc. to fit the inside of a box or enclosure.

Attached is a PDF which discusses the process of making an inside template.



Attached is the PDF file with all the instruction images.

You can use 3Ms correction and cover-up  tape in this process.



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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#23
Jan 15, 2017, 05:14 am Last Edit: Jan 15, 2017, 05:22 am by LarryD
I guess there are others who have the same crappy soldering iron holder.

Attached is the 1:1 PDF for the sides and the back which you can use to cut out your own inserts.
I just eye balled the front piece.



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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

TomGeorge

#24
Jan 15, 2017, 07:31 am Last Edit: Jan 15, 2017, 07:33 am by TomGeorge
Hi,
At work I have to calibrate a device that requires its Program ROM to be removed and a calibration ROM fitted, just to cal the device.
The Cal ROM is plugged and unplugged about 100 times a year, so to protect its bendable/breakable leads we have it fitted into a machined DIP socket and we then plug the machined socket into the ROM socket.


Unfortunately we cannot do it to the Program ROM due to PCB clearance problems so the Program ROM is removed and fitted with the appropriate tools


So if you do not have ICSP provision on your custom PCB and need to swap out your 328 to a UNO PCB to program it , fit it with a machined DIP socket to protect its bendable pins.



Tom... :) 
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

larryd

#25
Jan 15, 2017, 08:23 am Last Edit: Jan 15, 2017, 08:31 am by LarryD
Tom
The sacrificial socket is a good idea.

I remember getting EPROMS back from the field with #22AWG wire soldered to broken pins ???
Good old days.

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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

terryking228

Regards, Terry King terry@yourduino.com  - Check great prices, devices and Arduino-related boards at http://YourDuino.com
HOW-TO: http://ArduinoInfo.Info

larryd

#27
Jan 16, 2017, 03:17 am Last Edit: Jan 23, 2017, 02:35 am by LarryD
Attached is a PDF discussing making holes for mounting components in panels.




Attached is the PDF file with all the instruction images.


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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

pert

Test Lead Stuff
I was meaning to post the dupont multimeter probes I made like that to this thread. Mine are dedicated leads instead of having the connectors like yours. I find those super useful and like how easy they are to use when breadboarding a circuit, rather than having some large probe handles with thick wires getting in the way.

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