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Topic: Share tips you have come across (Read 26244 times) previous topic - next topic

larryd

#30
Jan 17, 2017, 07:40 pm Last Edit: Jan 18, 2017, 04:36 am by LarryD
I was meaning to post the dupont multimeter probes I made like that to this thread. Mine are dedicated leads instead of having the connectors like yours. I find those super useful and like how easy they are to use when breadboarding a circuit, rather than having some large probe handles with thick wires getting in the way.
In some situations, I use connectors made by the JST people.
Doing this helps keep the number of dedicated cables down to a minimum.

Using the male header end, it's great to plug your cable into the test equipment then straight into a breadboard.
Not having to hold test leads or use alligator clips on breadboards is very convenient.

https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=444118.msg3062937#msg3062937


No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

terryking228

Hi Larry,
Quote
PDF discussing making holes for mounting components in panels.
Where did this come from?  Any sources for those tools?

I just bought a step drill to make 7/8" holes for large pilot lights. A greenlee chassis punch is now up to $50 or so :-(

I'll grab some of the rest of this!
Regards, Terry King terry@yourduino.com  - Check great prices, devices and Arduino-related boards at http://YourDuino.com
HOW-TO: http://ArduinoInfo.Info

larryd

#32
Jan 18, 2017, 01:29 am Last Edit: Jan 18, 2017, 01:48 am by LarryD
Hi Larry, Where did this come from?  Any sources for those tools?

I just bought a step drill to make 7/8" holes for large pilot lights. A greenlee chassis punch is now up to $50 or so :-(

I'll grab some of the rest of this!
These are tools I use for chassis work.
I put the PDFs together to present the topics.

I got the Body Reamer from Banggood.   Must have tool. I think this one.

Hole punch from http://www.firemountaingems.com/itemdetails/h203955tl
Brad bits from Leevalley.
Unibit and Diamond Needle Files from eBay, not sure which seller.
Other tools at local Bolts Supply houses.

Greenlee. ???


Reminds me of the old tube days and making metal chassis for circuitry. ;)


.
No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#33
Jan 18, 2017, 03:20 am Last Edit: Jan 18, 2017, 03:21 am by LarryD
We all do it now and then.
If you have a few extra plugs and a spare hour, make up a Voltage/Current test cable.
This speeds up testing and gets rid of those ugly alligator clips.







.
No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#34
Jan 18, 2017, 03:25 am Last Edit: Jan 18, 2017, 04:37 am by LarryD
PCB vice.
You may have to tweek the clamps with a file to adjust the fit.

These are obviously for low profile SMD component boards before headers are soldered. ;)

These are handy to hold your PCBs while you solder components on the board.
At $7.00 they are reasonably priced.
The two holes in the base are for securing the fixture to a heavier sub-surface.

PCB vice.



.
No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

tinman13kup

PCB vice.
You may have to tweek the clamps with a file to adjust the fit.

These are handy to hold your PCBs while you solder components on the board.
At $7.00 they are reasonably priced.
The two holes in the base are for securing the fixture to a heavier sub-surface.

PCB vice.


.
Getting ready to make one of these. Just need to get in the garage and do it.

What do you have for putting solder paste on small pads?
Tom
It's not a hobby if you're not having fun doing it. Step back and breathe

larryd

#36
Jan 18, 2017, 04:15 am Last Edit: Jan 18, 2017, 04:38 am by LarryD
Getting ready to make one of these. Just need to get in the garage and do it.

What do you have for putting solder paste on small pads?
I was going to make a solder paste dispenser but found this one, bought two.
https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=429915.0

The designer said he was coming out with a new version in 2017.

Retired but new one coming.




No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

tinman13kup

The problem I have is the needle is 4x bigger than the pad I'm trying to paste. I've resorted to using a toothpick and pluck some out of the end of the needle and dab it where I want it. I've been playing with a lot of 0402 smds and am trying some 0201s on my next board. They don't need much paste. Many of the ic's (LQFP) I'm using really don't want much solder.
Tom
It's not a hobby if you're not having fun doing it. Step back and breathe

larryd

#38
Jan 18, 2017, 05:15 am Last Edit: Jan 18, 2017, 08:51 am by LarryD
:o  0201s  :o
Don't sneeze!

Nothing wrong with a tooth pick if it works.
I used a dental pick for a while.

I assume you have a Microscope.



008004  That's just not right  :smiley-small:



Lots here use stencils, I have not gotten into these yet but I suppose it would be easy enough to cut them out on the CAM tool.
.

Edit:
I was going to suggest that you make one of these:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJWUUK1s_G0


No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#39
Jan 18, 2017, 05:36 am Last Edit: Jan 18, 2017, 05:43 am by LarryD
Use breadboard helper boards to quickly test your circuit designs and sketch code.
When you come up with a design you often use, make a PCB to plug and play. ;)

I/O one place


Bobweeney from CrossRoads Atmega1284:




LED helper:
 





ATtinyX5 Breadboard Helper




Ardweeny



Power Supply for breadboard


No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

fettkeewl

Dont be afraid to add stuff you need directly on a board ^^

This is a programming board for the ESP8266-01 that I modified with a button and two wires.
In standard operating mode the esp8266 will run its loaded firmware / arduino code when plugged in,
however holding the button when connecting your device pulls gpio0 to ground allowing you to program the device.

The button is hotglued to the female header. Could do 1 more on the opposite side for device reset..




terryking228

Regards, Terry King terry@yourduino.com  - Check great prices, devices and Arduino-related boards at http://YourDuino.com
HOW-TO: http://ArduinoInfo.Info

tinman13kup

:o  0201s  :o
Don't sneeze!

I assume you have a Microscope.
Funny you say that. I seem to have picked up a nasty cold. As for the microscope, not a desktop unit yet. I'm using 25x loupe glasses. The focal length is a bit tight with a rework gun. I'm looking for a nice microscope like you have.

I was going to suggest that you make one of these:



I have one. I think it would just suck them up. I bought plenty of spares. I think 100 were only $1.
Tom
It's not a hobby if you're not having fun doing it. Step back and breathe

larryd

#43
Jan 19, 2017, 05:47 am Last Edit: Jan 19, 2017, 06:06 am by LarryD
Dont be afraid to add stuff you need directly on a board ^^

This is a programming board for the ESP8266-01 that I modified with a button and two wires.
In standard operating mode the esp8266 will run its loaded firmware / arduino code when plugged in,
however holding the button when connecting your device pulls gpio0 to ground allowing you to program the device.

The button is hotglued to the female header. Could do 1 more on the opposite side for device reset..
Yes, we all add things sooner or later to existing circuits.

You can use small pieces of PCB material, glue them to an existing PCB then add components to these pieces.

Here are some suggestion on the process.

Add components to a PCB.





Board segments




Came across this technique  while back, I do like it for adding things to PCBs.


No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

uxomm

Thank you LarryD!
It is so inspiring!
Always decouple electronic circuitry.

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