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Topic: Share tips you have come across (Read 25953 times) previous topic - next topic

larryd

#360
Sep 01, 2017, 11:44 pm Last Edit: Sep 02, 2017, 02:15 am by larryd
You may find these magnifiers handy ~$70

https://www.banggood.com/G600-Digital-1-600X-3-6MP-4-3inch-HD-LCD-Display-Microscope-Continuous-Magnifier-Upgrade-Version-p-1152799.html?rmmds=search

This version comes with an aluminum stand.
Could be use while soldering, but suggest you use a stereo microscope.






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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#361
Sep 01, 2017, 11:44 pm Last Edit: Sep 02, 2017, 12:40 am by larryd
A fume extractor, in this case one that just sucks/blows the fumes from the area where you are soldering.






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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#362
Sep 06, 2017, 02:28 am Last Edit: Sep 06, 2017, 06:05 am by larryd
Further to:
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3115248#msg3115248
And
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3109398#msg3109398

Small PCBs can be a challenge to mount in a project case.
This is especially true if the are no mounting holes in the PCB.
Below shows one way to attach an Arduino Pro Mini to the top of a case.

Note: no holes are made in the project case.
If the Pro Mini fails, just throw the assembly away with the Pro mini.






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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#363
Sep 06, 2017, 02:29 am Last Edit: Sep 06, 2017, 02:30 am by larryd






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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#364
Sep 06, 2017, 09:22 am Last Edit: Sep 07, 2017, 01:16 am by larryd
Any good DIYr/hobbyist should have a good set of carbide rotary cutting burrs.
These are used with an adjustable speed tool like a Dremel.
Burr speed 'must' be matched to the material you are working with ex: plastics slow, aluminum faster.
Examples, you may want to:
- enlarge a hole a little bit to the left of where it is
- create a slot to mount a switch, motor, rectangular LED etc.
- bevel one side of the hole
- create a key way

For safety reasons, 'never' drill a starting hole with the burr itself.
Just as important, never use a burr that has a larger diameter than the starting hole.
Always clamp your work.
Let the burr do the work, do not force the tool.
Cut/shape from the bad side of your work.
The burr turns clock wise CW; moving the tool CW, will give better tool control, best experiment on piece of scrap.

Use safety glasses when working.

Example:
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/10x-Titanium-Coat-Carbide-1-5mm-3-175mm-End-Mill-Engraving-Bits-CNC-Rotary-Burrs-/141219896957?hash=item20e15c9e7d:g:fGoAAOxykMpTIQ7P









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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

Jiggy-Ninja

Examples, you may want to:
- enlarge a hole a little bit to the left of where it is
- create a slot to mount a switch, motor, rectangular LED etc.
- bevel one side of the hole
- create a key way
Because normal drill bits suck horribly for these things. Take it from me, just don't even try it.

Quote
For safety reasons, 'never' drill a starting hole with the burr itself.
Just as important, never use a burr that has a larger diameter than the starting hole.
What is the risk? That it "runs away"?
Hackaday: https://hackaday.io/MarkRD
Advanced C++ Techniques: https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=493075.0

Jiggy-Ninja

#366
Sep 06, 2017, 01:49 pm Last Edit: Sep 06, 2017, 01:49 pm by Jiggy-Ninja
Examples, you may want to:
- enlarge a hole a little bit to the left of where it is
But what if I want to enlarge my hole a little bit to the right? Do I need a different tool?
Hackaday: https://hackaday.io/MarkRD
Advanced C++ Techniques: https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=493075.0

ElCaron

But what if I want to enlarge my hole a little bit to the right? Do I need a different tool?
Turn the PCB around?

larryd

#368
Sep 07, 2017, 12:12 am Last Edit: Sep 07, 2017, 12:17 am by larryd
But what if I want to enlarge my hole a little bit to the right? Do I need a different tool?
Life is tough ;)

Quote
What is the risk? That it "runs away"?
Yes the tool can/will skirt across the surface.



Also, the burr should be ( ;) ) turning clock wise CW.
You will find moving the tool clock clockwise CW, will give better tool control.
Best experiment on a piece of scrap.

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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#369
Sep 12, 2017, 12:04 am Last Edit: Sep 12, 2017, 01:59 am by larryd
DIY 3rd hand with connection to power supply and DVM.
This uses 'Pin jacks/plugs' you can also use 'Banana jacks/plugs'.

Magnets are attracted to the stainless steel 403 work surface with Teflon covering.








No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#370
Sep 12, 2017, 12:04 am Last Edit: Sep 12, 2017, 12:06 am by larryd




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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#371
Sep 12, 2017, 06:50 pm Last Edit: Sep 12, 2017, 06:57 pm by larryd
Make a new project standoff from an existing standoff .










No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#372
Sep 12, 2017, 06:50 pm Last Edit: Sep 12, 2017, 06:53 pm by larryd






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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

JohnRob

Hi,

I couple of tips some users might find handy:

1) The use of stepped drill bits.  Long ago I thought stepped drill bits were a gimmick that only looked good on the hardware store shelf.  Then I tried one and was hooked.  These bits EXCEL in drilling thin plastic and metal.  Drilling a 1/2 or 3/4 inch hole, or even worst trying to expand an existing hole was always troublesome.  With these bits there is no longer a problem and the holes come out perfect.  However you are limited to the diameters on your step drill.
See attached.

Sorry I don't know how to insert a picture.  I tried the insert image button but did know how to get a photo on my desktop to someplace with a URL.

2)  I purchased a current driver on ebay.   When it arrived I noticed it had some really limp wire for the connections.  I was interested because on small projects PVC (or even worse IR PVC) wire is kind of stiff. With some research I found this silicone wire on ebay.

ebay silicone wire


I chose this particular vendor because they had multiple sizes and colors so I could the wire I wanted from one place and hopefully it would be very similar (it was).

I purchased 5 M of #22, #24 and #26.   What I received was pretty decent wire.  The strands were tin coated, the insulation was very flexible.  My first use was terminating LED light strips.  They always complain when stressed at the termination point.


Hope this helps some folks.

John

larryd

#374
Sep 16, 2017, 12:31 am Last Edit: Sep 16, 2017, 01:08 am by larryd
Step drill


I totally agree with using step drills with plastics.
I prefer the ones that have two cutting flutes.

Brad point bits work well too.
http://www.leevalley.com/en/hardware/page.aspx?p=43255&cat=3,41306,41330   


Wire


Thanks for the tip on that wire.
I've been looking for a supplier for very flexible high strand count wire.
Looks like the insulation will be great too.


I see they have 24AWG 40 strand wire.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/5M-Flexible-Stranded-Silicone-Rubber-Wire-Cable-24AWG-Gauge-OD-1-5mm-Black-BS5-/172742251859?hash=item28383d9553:g:9VsAAOSw~e5ZSrRS 


How to post an image:
https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=364156.0

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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

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