Go Down

Topic: A good switch idea for my trim-switches for custom r/c ground station (Read 514 times) previous topic - next topic

DocStein99

I am trying to build an openTX / clone transmitter for an R/C ground station - using atMega2560.  The suitcase houses a LCD screen, sticks, levers, knobsI have to  pick out some switches or buttons to use for trim switches on the control panel.  The trim switch is like a power-window switch, 3 (or more) pins.   

I was actually trying to find the short duck-bill type (rocker? - I do not know what industry term is).  I ordered some 3p momentary switches from eBay:

Common economy 3p on off on switch

(the link above): These switches really take ALOT of physical force, and I often need TWO HANDS to toggle the over sized spring.  They would probably do the job, but I would not feel confident showing off my skills to someone else, by choosing these very common switches.

I was hoping anyone had ideas, of nice up/down momentary switches they seen or used?  Something that obviously can be toggled up/down with just one finger.  Size is not a big concern, I am not designing a tiny box , but I do have trouble finding switches that either are tiny PCB size, or GIGANTIC - MAME/ARCADE sized switches.

Any switches, buttons you seen which are your favorites, or good ideas to use are welcome, please - I enjoy actually collecting switches.  I'm trying to make my ground station look like those Star-Wars control panels from the death-star, or inside of the cockpit of Millenium Falcon.



promacjoe2

Are these terms which is going to be used to control RC airplane, or something else.

a little more information would be helpful.

DocStein99

I have many r/c's.  2 wheeled, and a quadcopter are primarily going to be used.  The wheeled are large, inbetween size of riding and push mowers.  Quadcopters are testing, have a small one and building larger 24" span with 12" props for aerial photography.

I am not exactly sure where your going with or how in-depth you need to know about the RC devices, that my transmitter will be controlling.  My books for my designs are stacked about 2 feet high from the last 9 months to the very least.

promacjoe2

Switches are normally used for on/off, All or nothing scenario. Trim controls are normally more precise, Increasing or decreasing the PWM output by a very small amount. A potentiometer/variable resistor would be better for this. What processor are you using and how did you connect your primary controls.

DocStein99

It's an Arduino Mega2560.  I'm doing an openTX project.  The schematic calls for switches (or momentary buttons).  I understand - yes maybe POTs better, except changing this is more involved.

If I want to change it to use POTs instead, I have to sort through the 10,000k lines of code from 30+ programmers, after figuring out which of the 8 other software packages the git-hub readme explains that I must install, just to compile the project myself.  To get my stuff done some time this year, I will just be using their pre-compiled .hex files as software and deal with my customized modifications when time permits.

Wawa

These switches really take ALOT of physical force, and I often need TWO HANDS to toggle the over sized spring.
Had some cheap clones who did that.
Good ones take almost no force to move the lever.
Leo..

DocStein99

Here is MY example of a GOOD switch:

eBAY / omron switch, with LED - as used in 1980 Knight Rider control panel.

It has a very gentle CLICK, WITH a LED - and was actually used on one of America's greatest icons: "Knight Rider".  It has everything going for it.  They are used in electric musical instruments, as well.  Unfortunately, they are EXPENSIVE.  So I have to harvest them - setup snipe scans on eBay to be notified when any new item priced below a value is found on a search, and it takes forever.  They are expensive. The only way I can get them is to prowl for deals and buy when price is right, since I need like 20 switches to make any one of a number of my projects.  They are as wide as a thumb, so using them for trim switches is not ideal since I have no purpose for LED indicators on that function.

Now after I re-read my own text, I realize - there are cherry mx switches, used on computer gaming keyboards, all the time - which are cheap, since they are common.  I can fabricate my own button heads for them, or pick from the plethora of ones they already make.




dougp


Go Up