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Topic: Help with Schematic for IR Remote (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

krptodr

Hello, I am new here and am trying to learn electronics. I have taken an introductory AC and DC class, but fear it's been to long and have forgotten a lot.

I need help building an IR schematic that will allow me to program an atiny85 to read in the value from a controller and then allow me to use that value to send it with a second button. I will need to build a sperate schematic so that it can read in the value being given from the first schematic.

I want to test it in LTSpice IV for simulation so that I can test it out.

If anyone has any ideas on what I would need, please let me know. I know I need an IR transmitter/Receiver for both circuits. If I use the Atiny85 I know that program code can control the frequency by not using the onboard resonator. If I dont use the Atiny85 and instead use capacitors for propper frequency control, I can build it without using the Atiny85.

Is anyone willing to help me with this?

Please let me know. I am very interested in learning.

Grumpy_Mike

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I need help building an IR schematic that will allow me to program an atiny85 to read in the value from a controller and then allow me to use that value to send it with a second button. I will need to build a sperate schematic so that it can read in the value being given from the first schematic.


Sorry that makes little sense why do you want two circuits?

Try this:-
http://www.ladyada.net/learn/sensors/ir.html

krptodr

Well, Im currently just in the planning stage, but what I want to achieve is the ability to power on my PC via a remote control. The remote control will be Circuit #1 and should be able to read in a remote control button and then use that IR code via Circuit #1. (of course they can use a remote control as well.. but for sakes of carrying the remote around, I'd like to build my own device for it. It adds to my learning abilities lol) 

As for the second circuit, it will be connected to the power pins on the motherboard. (because the power button on the case broke, thus this idea sparked.) Circuit #2 will need to receive the IR code from #1 but will need to also know the IR code so that it can verify it. (of course this will require programming so the atiny85 will probably be used.)

If this can be done without an atiny85 and purely through capacitance for timing, then i'd like to observe that option. Of course the ability to store the remote code would need to be excluded.

I will check out that link provided.

But please help me expand on this and help. I greatly appreciate it.

Grumpy_Mike

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Hello, I am new here and am trying to learn electronics.

So switching mains is probably not the best project to start off with. This requires a modicum of skill to do safely. Start off learning to flash LEDs and such. Then go on to look at those tutorials I posted. They contain most of what you want to do on the receive side. Use an existing remote to begin with. Only when this works can you go on to build your own remote substitute.

krptodr

I understand that electronics involves some rather careful judgement. However, I am familiar with electronics and know how to be careful. At most I would be using is roughly 5 V. Now as for blinking LED's I am far beyond that, but what I have not learned is how to build a circuit of this magnitude. I am sure I can build one with the Atiny85 but I just thought I'd get someones input on building one that doesn't require an Atiny85. Because it's that, that really interests me.

jwatte

So, why can't the decoding circuit also switch the mosfet that controls the Pc power button? Or am I missing something? Do you know how ir remote controls work in general? (RC5, NEC, and similar carrier+bits encodings)

Wire up an ir receiver for the right frequency to an input pin. Write a sketch that recognizes the "on" and "off" codes you care abouts and sets the output pin appropriately. Hook that to a mosfet or bjt that makes/breaks the power button connection (or a relay that in turns does the right thing, or an optoisolator...)

If you then want to also build an actual remote control, generate the right carrier frequency using a PWM and modulate it to generate the right bit pattern using an output pin. Sending a fixed code "could" be done with a cascade of 555 timers, but that would be really inefficient. In practice, both sending, and receiving, remote control signals requires a microcontroller or ASIC of some sort.

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