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Topic: what i have been up to, thus far. (Read 24954 times) previous topic - next topic

TKall

Congratulations on a successful first run!

travis_farmer

thanks :D

one other thing about it. i know a router is loud, but inside that CNC camper...  :o  :o  :o

~Travis
Current Obsession: Photography, astronomy, server rack cooler.
Check out my website, i have my own very under-used forum on my hobby server.

TKall

The first thing I used my CNC for was to cut acrylic sheets that I used to mount MEGA's to DIN rail.  It worked quite well.

travis_farmer

i thought about using a piece of clear acrylic for my test run, but i figured wood would be easier on the bit, in case i needed to slow down the feed rate.

~Travis
Current Obsession: Photography, astronomy, server rack cooler.
Check out my website, i have my own very under-used forum on my hobby server.

TKall

The acrylic has a tendency to gum up.  I'm still a total newbie.  LarryD is a good resource.

Qdeathstar

you could potentially add counterweights on the z axis. People do that with deltas for flying extruded mods. Alternatively, you could get some pulleys and use them to drive the z axis to gain some mechanical advantage. Springs seem like they might increase backlash, but if you don't do any/a lot of z-lifts then it doesn't matter to much, maybe.
A creaking creeping shadow
stiff against the freezing fog
glares at a tickless watch.

Time has failed him -- all things shall pass.

travis_farmer

Hmm, counterweights, interesting idea. though with the amount of Z travel, i would need either long leverage, or a cable and pulley system. springs tend to wear out and break...
if anything, over-weighing the counter weights a touch may lift the router in a power failure. though i think i would prefer to have the router stay exactly where it was left, in after-thought.

~Travis
Current Obsession: Photography, astronomy, server rack cooler.
Check out my website, i have my own very under-used forum on my hobby server.

travis_farmer

well, i have a 2-day vacation :D first multi-day vacation is many years. actually, at work we are between job sites, and as i have two days with several appointments, it was easier to just take a short vacation, one day paid. the other option was for my father to start a big job by himself. as he is getting up in the years, i understand his point of view.

the problem here is that as this is so infrequent, neither my father or i have any idea on what to do today and tomorrow. ;)

~Travis
Current Obsession: Photography, astronomy, server rack cooler.
Check out my website, i have my own very under-used forum on my hobby server.

GoForSmoke

If anything is being harvested maybe get a bunch cheap? Peas maybe, they taste so good fresh.

Or get down the coast and buy lobsta off the pier?

There's someone in Franklin Co. with a laser tag arena but I dunno if it's up and going yet.

Some time look on youtube for warping concrete. It's glass fiber reinforced (GFRC), they pour out flat shapes, wait for it to set a bit then bend the crete like you would steamed wood.

Look a bit more into fiber-crete with wood shavings or paper pulp. If you like it, you might take it somewhere.
Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

travis_farmer

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If anything is being harvested maybe get a bunch cheap? Peas maybe, they taste so good fresh.
Hmm, they do taste good fresh. they even taste good raw (and fresh).

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Or get down the coast and buy lobsta off the pier?
Personally, i don't much care for lobster. and it is a bit far away to drive, when i have a few appointments today. ;)

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There's someone in Franklin Co. with a laser tag arena but I dunno if it's up and going yet.
i tried that once. seemed like i was mostly just an easy walking target. ;)

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Some time look on youtube for warping concrete. It's glass fiber reinforced (GFRC), they pour out flat shapes, wait for it to set a bit then bend the crete like you would steamed wood.

Look a bit more into fiber-crete with wood shavings or paper pulp. If you like it, you might take it somewhere.
that is a bit more artistic than my brain is capable of ;)

having nothing to do was actually more of a joke statement. we will likely be cleaning out the shop, and job trailer to prep for the next job. i also have to work on the Hall-Effect home/limit switches for my CNC, as well as devise a way to help support the Z-axis.

~Travis
Current Obsession: Photography, astronomy, server rack cooler.
Check out my website, i have my own very under-used forum on my hobby server.

GoForSmoke

i also have to work on the Hall-Effect home/limit switches for my CNC, as well as devise a way to help support the Z-axis.

~Travis
If you set the linear Hall sensor and magnet up and then slide a piece of steel (can metal will do) in between, it should read less to nothing.

If you can read the magnet through a hole in one piece of steel and slide another in to shut it off then you have diminished the sense area. I have no real idea of how small a hole can work.

If you move the magnet across the direction that the Hall sensor points, the read values should peak when they are directly across from each other as long as the magnet is pointing at the Hall switch right then.

Make yourself a Hall sensor wand and have fun probing magnets and EM fields. If you combine a magnet and Hall sensor then you should be able to detect moving non-magnetic metals. You can use the wand to detect EMF in your own projects.
Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

travis_farmer

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If you set the linear Hall sensor and magnet up and then slide a piece of steel (can metal will do) in between, it should read less to nothing.
that is the design i was thinking of for the home/limit sensors. that way the signal will be normally active, so a dead sensor will have the same effect as a trigger. :D

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If you can read the magnet through a hole in one piece of steel and slide another in to shut it off then you have diminished the sense area. I have no real idea of how small a hole can work.
interesting... could make the sensors much more accurate.

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If you move the magnet across the direction that the Hall sensor points, the read values should peak when they are directly across from each other as long as the magnet is pointing at the Hall switch right then.
i like the first two, as they would be normally active. this was my initial design though, before i had done much research.

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Make yourself a Hall sensor wand and have fun probing magnets and EM fields. If you combine a magnet and Hall sensor then you should be able to detect moving non-magnetic metals. You can use the wand to detect EMF in your own projects.
the Hall sensors are in the A314_ family (open collector output), so the wand would only tell me of the presence of EMF, not so much the strength. interesting idea though.

if i recall, and i am sure i am wrong, isn't that how a non-contact live circuit AC probe works?

~Travis
Current Obsession: Photography, astronomy, server rack cooler.
Check out my website, i have my own very under-used forum on my hobby server.

GoForSmoke

You need a Linear Hall Sensor, not a Hall Switch. The Hall Effect is used in many different devices, just because it says Hall doesn't mean it's the Hall you want. For your limit switch, maybe good but for probing EM fields and finding out what's going on you'll want the linear sensor and probably some kind of sensitivity control circuit.

You might want the linear Hall finding where the magnet field is strongest as that may provide your best zero.

A linear Hall sensor has a direction along which it measures field strength. You get strength and direction. If you make a wand that points in the direction and lets you get the sensor away from your hand then you can find the invisible shape of the field.

You can get more precise stops with light and use the Hall or cap sense to tell the motor to slow down, fwiw.

With 2 slits and a red led you can probably get an interference pattern. That will gives bands of light to sense and if the distance from slits to sensor is small, the distance between bands wil be smaller... you'd need to mask the sensor to see only narrow light or dark band alone.  And no, you don't have to have a laser to do the double-slit experiment, it's just more clear with one.
Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

travis_farmer

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You need a Linear Hall Sensor, not a Hall Switch. The Hall Effect is used in many different devices, just because it says Hall doesn't mean it's the Hall you want. For your limit switch, maybe good but for probing EM fields and finding out what's going on you'll want the linear sensor and probably some kind of sensitivity control circuit.
bought a few AH3503's to experiment with. :D they are discontinued by Allegro, but i got them real cheap from china (probably bootlegs, my luck).

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You might want the linear Hall finding where the magnet field is strongest as that may provide your best zero.
hadn't thought of that... i was going to just slot the mount for the hall switch so i could adjust it for optimal zero. it would be very handy to know where the field is for my magnets.

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A linear Hall sensor has a direction along which it measures field strength. You get strength and direction. If you make a wand that points in the direction and lets you get the sensor away from your hand then you can find the invisible shape of the field.
Hmm, interesting... (got my brain thinking).

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You can get more precise stops with light and use the Hall or cap sense to tell the motor to slow down, fwiw.
I was steered away from optical (on CNCzone), as the router dust may obstruct the sensor, unless i build it into a sealed mechanical sensor that passes a vane through the sensor. seemed like hall would be easier to implement, of the non-mechanical sensors.

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With 2 slits and a red led you can probably get an interference pattern. That will gives bands of light to sense and if the distance from slits to sensor is small, the distance between bands will be smaller... you'd need to mask the sensor to see only narrow light or dark band alone.  And no, you don't have to have a laser to do the double-slit experiment, it's just more clear with one.
a while back, i was reading "Hyperspace" - Michio Kaku (a bit of light reading ;) ), and he described light interference patterns. I never tried the experiment, but it looks neat. I may give it a try. :D

on the Ham Radio project, i received a spool of coax (RG8X), so once the UHF (PL259) connectors arrive, i can start antenna experimentation. course, after i ordered it, i found RG8U was better for long runs. DOH! oh well, i will make do with what i have.
I also ordered an inexpensive used SWR/Power meter, so i can make sure not to burn up my radio PA. eventually i will get an antenna analyzer, but not with my current budget.

~Travis
Current Obsession: Photography, astronomy, server rack cooler.
Check out my website, i have my own very under-used forum on my hobby server.

GoForSmoke

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I was steered away from optical (on CNCzone), as the router dust may obstruct the sensor, unless i build it into a sealed mechanical sensor that passes a vane through the sensor. seemed like hall would be easier to implement, of the non-mechanical sensors.
So true about the dust and all.

With the linear Hall you can delineate mag field through or not holes or slots in sheet steel, or how moving metal affects an existing field (gear tooth counter) or whatever else might seem neat for whatever use it may have.

Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

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