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Topic: Arduino CNC GRBL: using Inkscape to create DXF files (Read 4798 times) previous topic - next topic

larryd

In your software, you control X & Y cutting speeds, also your Z down speed.

You will also have to adjust the spindle speed per surface you are cutting.


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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

I use 1/4" trimmer routers (with 1/8" collets as needed), has built in speed control.



Home Depot


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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd




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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

Never needed software spindle speed control in 24 years since I bough my CNC.

You do need to adjust router/spindle speed for types of wood and different kinds of plastics.

When you determine the best speeds to prevent burning/melting, write it down along with the X,Y and Z speeds and bit type used.

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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

Robin2

I am thinking of starting with just 2D engravings, to begin with.
That should be perfectly possible with GCode derived from HPGL output from Inkscape.

One of the things that has put me off GRBL (and the LinuxCNC etc) is the absence of simple advice explaining how it "knows" where the tool tip is so as not to crash into the work piece and how the zero position is set for measurements against each different piece of material that is to be cut. It has always seemed to me that the authors assumed a level of knowledge bout the process of CNC machining that I don't have. My solution was to write my own Python code.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Robin2

and watch as all heck breaks out ;)
That's been the bit that has bothered me. :)

I think your description is generally correct - but I don't know if it is exactly correct, and I don't know how to find out.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Qdeathstar

#21
Apr 13, 2017, 03:52 am Last Edit: Apr 13, 2017, 03:53 am by Qdeathstar
The steppers are probably nema17. Nema 23s are probably better but they require stand alone drivers because most boards can't provide the required current. I think a smoothieboard might support nema23's

I'd recommend checking out cnc zone.
http://www.cnczone.com/forums/diy-cnc-router-table-machines/
A creaking creeping shadow
stiff against the freezing fog
glares at a tickless watch.

Time has failed him -- all things shall pass.

Qdeathstar

#22
Apr 14, 2017, 04:47 am Last Edit: Apr 14, 2017, 04:48 am by Qdeathstar
:/ meh.

You posted about stepper motors and then bumped your own topic three times. A journal is something you do on your own, unless it's a buold thread, and then you post pictures. Also, approximately zero people care you have autism. Just saying.
A creaking creeping shadow
stiff against the freezing fog
glares at a tickless watch.

Time has failed him -- all things shall pass.

Qdeathstar

#23
Apr 14, 2017, 01:39 pm Last Edit: Apr 14, 2017, 01:40 pm by Qdeathstar
Don't be so victimy.

The only time anyone has friends is when they got something other people want or when they're getting ready to get shitfaced. Other than that, you wake up, work, come home, eat, jack off, and go to sleep.
A creaking creeping shadow
stiff against the freezing fog
glares at a tickless watch.

Time has failed him -- all things shall pass.

Qdeathstar

The real question is if you know you are emotionally different why object to the social behavior of someone who presumably isn't?

Like, let's just say you were schizophrenic and you knew it. Would you question someone if they told you you were hallucinating
A creaking creeping shadow
stiff against the freezing fog
glares at a tickless watch.

Time has failed him -- all things shall pass.

Robin2

The real question is if you know you are emotionally different
May I suggest that you allow this train of thought to die out. This is not a Therapy Forum.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

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