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Topic: A sense of loss when your skills are no longer required? (Read 3250 times) previous topic - next topic

Robin2

You never know - don't forget the old hand skills and do pass them on to your children. Times may change.
True - Jared Diamond's book "Collapse" makes very sober reading.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

msssltd

Do other people feel a sense of loss when some skill you were (perhaps secretly) proud of is no longer needed because technology or tastes have moved on?
Not any more.  I have worked in the technology sector far too long.

My first real tech job was on the ground floor, wireman and pcb assembly. I managed to progress to prototype-wireman and test-engineer just as pick and place took off.  The deskilling eventually caught me up and I was chased out of the test department by Automated Test Envirnments, which rendered the job eben less interesting than where I started, stuffing boards and building looms in production. 

By a fluke of interviews I moved over to networks, integrating digital telephony trunk interfaces with Netware voice servers.  The rate at which I have needed to forget stuff, has sort of climbed from there.  All the time I invested teaching myself the inner depths of IPX, ISDN2, DOS, Quemm, QNX and OS/2 (to name a few), is worthless today.  I remember a performance review where I complained to my boss I was doing too much with NT Server (3.1) and not enough with Netware (if only I knew). 

These days I tend to think moving on to the next thing, without clinging, is a skill in itself.  However, every now and again, when I am decommissioing some system I only put in a couple years ago, I find myself pondering how I may have been more content as a wireman, if only that trade had not all but dissapeared.


TomGeorge

Hi,
Well these workers may have been on a car production line, but where do they use their skills, along with hundreds of support industry workers.

https://thewest.com.au/business/automotive/final-week-of-car-manufacturing-in-australia-then-900-holden-factory-workers-lose-their-jobs-ng-b88629579z

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-07/ford-closes-its-australian-factories-after-more-than-90-years/7909836

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-03/toyota-car-production-ends-altona-after-50-years-manufacturing/9007624

I know its happened in the US too, but what a loss of skills.

And we now no longer make cars in Australia for the average guy in the street.

Tom... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

ardly

All this talk of woodwork made me lookup some "impossible" joints that really have been made. I think they use all sorts of tricks like steaming, compressing and drying - not something that will get automated any time soon. I really admire people that are good with their hands.

I don't feel a loss as IT skills become obsolete. There are times though that I worry about keeping abreast of the changes. It is easy to get  stuck in a technology rut where you don't develop the new skills and new experience that are attractive to employers.






"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored" - Aldous Huxley

travis_farmer

 :o  :o  :o
I think i know how it could be done, but still. even my father had to take a second look at it.

~Travis
Current Obsession: My server rack cooler, and my CNC Router
Check out my website, i have my own under-used forum on my hobby server.

Boardburner2

#20
Oct 16, 2017, 10:28 pm Last Edit: Oct 16, 2017, 10:38 pm by Boardburner2
All this talk of woodwork made me lookup some "impossible" joints that really have been made. I think they use all sorts of tricks like steaming, compressing and drying - not something that will get automated any time soon. I really admire people that are good with their hands.

I don't feel a loss as IT skills become obsolete. There are times though that I worry about keeping abreast of the changes. It is easy to get  stuck in a technology rut where you don't develop the new skills and new experience that are attractive to employers.







Ah the diagonal assembly.
Easy with CNC but not easy with hand tools.
Had that as a test back when i was practising dovetail joints.

travis_farmer

Hmm, diagonal. not what i had thought... but makes sense now that i think about it.

~Travis
Current Obsession: My server rack cooler, and my CNC Router
Check out my website, i have my own under-used forum on my hobby server.

Robin2

Ah the diagonal assembly.
That idea crossed my mind when I saw Reply #18 - I suspect I have seen that joint before.

Perhaps it is not a real dovetail joint, just a conjuring trick that looks like one?

Any pictures of it as two separate pieces?

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

larryd

No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

robtillaart

#24
Oct 17, 2017, 09:07 am Last Edit: Oct 17, 2017, 09:08 am by robtillaart
@Robin2

Depending on how you define the skills, they are not obsolete. The understanding how things work is still useful in explaining its behavior, this analytic nature developed over the years. Imho that is the real skill and it can be applied every day. You can apply it for writing low level code, but the next day you use it to dissasemble a bike gear or repair a fridge. A skill does not dissapear or become obsolete, the domain it is applied to is constantly changing.

Rob Tillaart

Nederlandse sectie - http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html -
(Please do not PM for private consultancy)

ardly

This guy saw an image of the impossible dovetail and worked out how to make it for real, not a diagonal assembly;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpuV9ZdHHlY
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored" - Aldous Huxley

Boardburner2


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