Go Down

Topic: Arduino Due Obsolete? (Read 13347 times) previous topic - next topic

ArthurD

Oh, there might indeed be a board with about the same performance as Due with very good Arduino compatibility & support, with 12 bit ADC & DAC and even 5V tolerance on its I/O pins....
..and providing 80 GPIOs, not to forget... ;)

duramaxhd

Really frustrating to hear this...im developing a product based on the Due/SAM3X architecture that specfically requires two CANbus controllers...there arent any other Arduino-compatible microcontrollers out there with the horsepower and two native CAN controllers required for my project. :(

Hopefully the SAM3X will still be around for a few more years....or at least until Arduino starts supporting something with similar capabilities. (32-bit, dual native CAN controllers)

ArthurD

#32
Jun 30, 2016, 08:19 pm Last Edit: Jun 30, 2016, 09:23 pm by ArthurD
as already mentioned here, on Arduino.org the Due is still listed - and another additional board, which might also find your interest:
the STAR OTTO (funny name IMO):

http://www.arduino.org/component/k2/itemlist/filter?array1%5B%5D=Advanced&array2%5B%5D=ARM&array3%5B%5D=CAN&moduleId=182&Itemid=103
Microcontroller STM32F469BI
Architecture ARM Cortex-M4

(2 CAN provided)

Collin80

That star otto sounds interesting but for a few problems

1. I can't seem to purchase one. Does it even exist yet?

2. It's an Arduino.org project and they don't seem to do that well on the software side. I wonder how easily it'd be to use the CAN buses on that thing? I suppose I could download their IDE and see if there is currently a library for it.

Luckily, it seems like they kept Due compatibility for the pinout so Due CAN shields should work.

Paul Stoffregen

#34
Jul 01, 2016, 02:19 pm Last Edit: Jul 01, 2016, 02:43 pm by Paul Stoffregen
there arent any other Arduino-compatible microcontrollers out there with the horsepower and two native CAN controllers required for my project. :(
The upcoming Teensy (currently in beta testing) has 2 CAN ports.  It's also 180 MHz with FPU and 256K RAM.  Hopefully powerful enough?  It won't have the Due form factor, so less I/O, but also small size and a lower price.

Of course Teensy isn't officially Arduino (cc or org).  I'd like to think the software support as been pretty good, but of course my opinion is biased.  ;)

I have to admit, that Star Otto board looks pretty amazing.  It'll be interesting to see if the dot org folks can learn how to do software well.

ArthurD

#35
Jul 01, 2016, 06:47 pm Last Edit: Jul 01, 2016, 06:48 pm by ArthurD
you may still also purchase Due clones from China for less than 15 EUR
http://www.ebay.de/itm/DUE-R3-Board-SAM3X8E-32-bit-ARM-Cortex-M3-Control-Board-Module-for-Arduino-/252114825305?hash=item3ab336f059:g:e9sAAOSw5VFWF139

anyway, the problem is not the board itself, but the software support by Arduino.cc IDE plus further development for it's libs and stackable DUE-compatible shields (e.g., stackable L298 motor H-Bridges feat. rotary encoder readings, and PID control)

Paul Stoffregen

Looking at the Star Otto photos, I can't figure out how it has the advertised USB Host.  There's only 1 USB connector which looks like a device-only Micro-B.

The ST chip might actually have 2 USB ports.  One of them might even be capable of 480 Mbit/sec USB (like Due), but perhaps needing a ULPI PHY chip?  Maybe the 2nd port is routed to one of the connectors?

ST's website also says it has an ethernet mac.  I wonder if they're planned for the ability to make an ethernet shield, or if it'll end up like Due with that awesome capability unusable?

Collin80

Looking at the Star Otto photos, I can't figure out how it has the advertised USB Host.  There's only 1 USB connector which looks like a device-only Micro-B.
It's my guess that by USB host they really mean USB OTG (on the go) which is kind of the same basic idea. The due should be able to use that mode as well. That does technically make it a USB host able to do things like talk to flash drives, mice, and keyboards. I have cables that you can use for this purpose. I can use such a cable to connect a webcam to an android smart phone since new Android phones support OTG as well.

ArthurD

#38
Jul 03, 2016, 01:05 pm Last Edit: Jul 03, 2016, 01:16 pm by ArthurD
IMO,
- just for the moment, an Arduino Due Clone from China will be good enough.
- for the near future some addional DUE-compatible shields with additional features and HID USB support would be fine
- for the long run, only a quadcore like the Pi 3 (but completely driven by the Arduino IDE , barebone, no Linux wishfully) would have the best conditions for a long-term success of a advanced-power-Arduino board, usable also for Arduino beginners like all other Arduino  boards currently.

Or take the Pi 3 "as it is", drop all that Linux stuff, and build a barebone Arduino board out of it 8)

Paul Stoffregen

Or take the Pi 3 "as it is", drop all that Linux stuff, and build a barebone Arduino board out of it 8)
But who will do this, when Broadcom refuses to sell the chips to distributors or any "small" companies?

westfw

Quote
when Broadcom refuses to sell the chips to distributors or any "small" companies?
And doesn't provide complete documentation, either.
And if you think you want to write bare metal code for a multi-core chip, that probably just means that you don't know much about the topic.
You should pay more attention to the Intel Galileo and Edison and their genral lack of followers...



ArthurD

I tried the Galileo  but the company does not support Win XP to install drivers (opposite to the Arduino IDE). Both have also far too few pins as they both have the Uno layout, so both can't be a candidate for a DUE succesor (perhaps, partially, just for a Zero).

And of course I am no low-level MCU programmer, but "bare metal" is also a subforum in the Raspberry.org forums (CMIIW).


Paul Stoffregen

You should pay more attention to the Intel Galileo and Edison and their genral lack of followers...
Indeed, it seems Intel drastically underestimated or misunderstood what Arduino compatibility really means.

I thought they were finally starting to do better with Arduino 101 / Curie, but recent activity and comments on github issues aren't very encouraging.

Paul Stoffregen

#43
Jul 04, 2016, 03:09 pm Last Edit: Jul 04, 2016, 03:10 pm by Paul Stoffregen
I tried the Galileo  but the company does not support Win XP to install drivers (opposite to the Arduino IDE).
I'm pretty sure the only reason Arduino's products install drivers and work with XP is because they're based on mature designs created many years ago.

Pretty much nobody bothers to test and support new products on XP.  Why would they?  XP is now under 10% of the market, and it's the 10% of the global population without budgets to buy new products.

Given the horrid state/bloat of Windows XP after many years of regular usage, and likelihood of malware especially with severe bugs still impacting all Windows versions being widely exploited and no patches on XP anymore, when you factor in the costs of tech support, simply disallowing any install on XP is probably a good business decision.  So much trouble which costs real money, for so few users, with such a tiny percentage of those few willing to spend their money on new products.

ArthurD

#44
Jul 04, 2016, 04:42 pm Last Edit: Jul 04, 2016, 07:48 pm by ArthurD
XP is another issue - but having to buy new software and new hardware additionally when changing to Win 7, 8, 8.1, or 10 is an expensive enjoyment.

OTOH, the far too few GPIO pins of a Galileo compared to the Due and the all-over horrible manufacturer's support are finally the knock-out arguments.

Go Up
 


Please enter a valid email to subscribe

Confirm your email address

We need to confirm your email address.
To complete the subscription, please click the link in the email we just sent you.

Thank you for subscribing!

Arduino
via Egeo 16
Torino, 10131
Italy