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Topic: Upset child (Read 5674 times) previous topic - next topic

stonerocks2003

I bought a smart car for my son's birthday and boy was he excited.  At least until he finished putting the car together and could not make it go. Now he has lost interest.  Thanks ARDUINO

spycatcher2k

Arduino don't sell smart cars! Why come whining to this forum?
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ballscrewbob

And was it a REAl arduino kit or some Chinese knock off ?

Was it one of these.

If not it was probably a cheaPO CLONE and as such certainly not the responsibility of Arduino.

And are you 100% sure it was built correctly ?
Just one wrong connection and you could let out the magic smoke that makes them work.



It may not be the answer you were looking for but its the one I am giving based on either experience, educated guess, google or the fact that you gave nothing to go with in the first place so I used my wonky crystal ball.

Qdeathstar

I feel like you and your child may have missed the point of a dyi project. If you wanted a remote control car they are readily available at toys r us ready to go.


You will need to troubleshoot and fix your child's mistake.
A creaking creeping shadow
stiff against the freezing fog
glares at a tickless watch.

Time has failed him -- all things shall pass.

AWOL

Installation & troubleshooting
Quote
For problems with Arduino itself, NOT your project
"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.
I speak for myself, not Arduino.

Boardburner2

Installation & troubleshooting
Dad used to help me with that.

Misreading instructions, gluing the wrong part ETC.

Took me a whole winter to get it working, Often crashed when the weather was god enough to fly.

Robin2

Then there was the millionaire who was away on business all the time and tried to make up for it by giving his small son really expensive presents. Then coming up to his birthday one year the kid told dad he just wanted a micky mouse outfit.


...


...



....



...



so dad bought him Volkswagen


....R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

AWOL

I heard it as the kid wanted a cowboy outfit, and the dad bought him <insert a real-estate company name here>
"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.
I speak for myself, not Arduino.

TomGeorge

I bought a smart car for my son's birthday and boy was he excited.  At least until he finished putting the car together and could not make it go. Now he has lost interest.  Thanks ARDUINO
Sorry I am at a loss, where did you post your enquiry?
Tom... :o
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

Delta_G

dyi project
I keep seeing DYI instead of DIY.  Does it actually mean something or is it just a super common typo?
If at first you don't succeed, up - home - sudo - enter.

ChrisTenone

"Thanks ARDUINO"

Haaaa. I see what you did there.

This happens a lot. When a noob gets a kit that is way above their skill level. One's first impulse is often to blame the materials or tools. Rest assured the Arudino platform is capable of many technical wonders. It is incumbent on you (or your son) to learn how to use it. If you bought a kit, you need to understand that kit from the ground up. Arduino is not easy. Educate your self, and work up to a complex project.
Wubba lubba dub dub!

Qdeathstar

#11
Oct 18, 2017, 11:23 am Last Edit: Oct 18, 2017, 02:45 pm by Qdeathstar
do yourself in project... do it yourself projects gone awry
A creaking creeping shadow
stiff against the freezing fog
glares at a tickless watch.

Time has failed him -- all things shall pass.

Budvar10

... Arduino is not easy.
No, I cannot agree with this part. Arduino is easy enough. Just to try UNO & blink sketch to "push your foot in to the door", but also the interest must be.
Arduino clone with ATmega1284P   http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=277260.0

Robin2

No, I cannot agree with this part. Arduino is easy enough. Just to try UNO & blink sketch to "push your foot in to the door", but also the interest must be.
I think whether it is easy or not depends on the user's mindset. As you say there needs to be an interest in the Arduino and in programming.

Someone whose only interest is in writing poetry can probably assemble a flat-pack writing desk so he has somewhere to do his/her writing. But if he has no interest in DIY woodwork and if there is a screw or a spanner missing from the pack he probably won't have a drawer with spare parts that could be used as a substitute.

IMHO most non-trivial Arduino projects are considerably more complex than building a flat-pack desk. They are a lot more fun also.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

ChrisTenone

No, I cannot agree with this part. Arduino is easy enough. Just to try UNO & blink sketch to "push your foot in to the door", but also the interest must be.

When teaching I use the term, "an easy problem" to mean one that has a single step, "easy" solution. Hard problems are those made up of a series of easy problems. One must think about the solution in the abstract in order to formulate the method to use for a solution, then solve the constituent "easy" problems, and how to string them together to arrive at the solution to the "hard" problem.

Arduino is certainly a system that requires solutions from many different easy problems. Even to effectively blink a LED.
Wubba lubba dub dub!

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