Go Down

Topic: How did we get to know all this sh*t? (Read 586 times) previous topic - next topic

larryd

#15
Today at 05:19 am Last Edit: Today at 05:20 am by larryd
How about waking up at 3 AM and you get that eureka moment.    :smiley-sleep:
No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

TomGeorge

How about waking up at 3 AM and you get that eureka moment.    :smiley-sleep:
Yes an epiphany.
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

Robin2

How about waking up at 3 AM and you get that eureka moment.    :smiley-sleep:
Yeah. That can be a very creative time.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

GoForSmoke

That's why I started out with a pad and pen on a table next to my bed.
And then I got my own computer. Yes, I debugged code in my sleep.

I worked late on code in 2 places where I'd let myself out at night. After mentioning figuring the bug out by the time I got to my car, I got keys to get back in.

James Burke made a series named The Real Thing in 1980. There's a copy from videotape on Youtube, it's about human brain workings and development as a mystery in 6 parts. By the end of part 5, the brain shouldn't work and then comes part 6 and ba-boom the mystery is solved in a way that the watcher can grow on.
One biggie for me was finding that humans have modes, we can see ourselves as finite state machines. Oh joy, where's the editor?
The first two episodes have some bad spots but it's the content that matters or just don't bother and tune in to something sparkely keen.

Who else is up to watching a mildly entertaining 4 hour series to learn about themselves and others? (sound of crickets)
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

MorganS

I love that different humans are interested in different things and remember arcane details about their specialization. For some, the private lives of movie stars are really important and they can speak for hours on who is going out with whom.

Like most of the regulars here, I have a good memory for technical stuff. But I am in awe of those who remember part numbers. A friend of mine often comes out with things like "Ahhhh! The 7508! I used to use them a lot in the 90s. Make sure you keep the ..." Me? I can't remember the name of the IMU chip I put on a breadboard last week and I have been programming on it all week.
"The problem is in the code you didn't post."

larryd

#20
Today at 05:20 pm Last Edit: Today at 05:21 pm by larryd
Along those lines, when I see a colour coded resistor, I see numbers when I look at each colour.

On a different topic, when I hear certain sounds, I see certain colours in the background. ???

Synesthesia.





No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

Go Up