Arduino Forum

Using Arduino => General Electronics => Topic started by: jtw11 on Sep 06, 2013, 12:05 pm

Title: Axial / 'inline' stud connector
Post by: jtw11 on Sep 06, 2013, 12:05 pm
Hello all,

In this day and age - everything seems to exist - except for what I'm after.

Of course, normal high power ring terminals exist to connect high power cables to other cables / devices / studs. However, i'm looking for an inline solution, so that the cable does not connect at right angles - I know there are of course mil-spec connectors that achieve just this - but I just want to be able to screw down a power cable inline with a power stud, such a solution would just be a simple two piece contact - however, I just can't think what the name of them would be if they exist, so can't seem to find them.

These must exist?

Failing this, I suppose just bend a ring terminal 90 degrees and cover it with a boot - but, that's not directly inline. I don't like mess, some may call it OCD.
Title: Re: Axial / 'inline' stud connector
Post by: MarkT on Sep 06, 2013, 01:12 pm
Do you mean bullet connectors as used in RC models - try looking on eBay for "4mm bullet connector" or similar
Title: Re: Axial / 'inline' stud connector
Post by: jtw11 on Sep 06, 2013, 02:43 pm
Nope, the solution i'm after needs to carry in excess of 100A - just like a large ring terminal bolted down against a threaded stud.

However, I don't want to bolt the high power cable at 90deg to the stud, but rather inline. So a two piece connector, one which is crimped to the cable at one end and is collared at one end, whilst a threaded collar bolts the whole assembly down onto the stud.
Title: Re: Axial / 'inline' stud connector
Post by: TomGeorge on Sep 06, 2013, 04:53 pm
Try  Anderson Powerpole connectors, RS and Element 14, and the Anderson Powerpole site..
http://www.andersonpower.com/products/singlepole-connectors.html
will be a start.
Tom. 8)
Title: Re: Axial / 'inline' stud connector
Post by: jtw11 on Sep 06, 2013, 04:55 pm
Hi Tom,

Nope - not that sort I'm afraid. There's a metal threaded stud on a device, and I want to thread something axially onto that, not at 90 degrees. I guess what I'm after dosen't exist.
Title: Re: Axial / 'inline' stud connector
Post by: majenko on Sep 06, 2013, 08:56 pm
Are you on about ring crimp connectors?

If so the closest thing is a right-angled ring connector:
(http://www.westfloridacomponents.com/mm5/graphics/00000001/LG188.jpg)
http://www.westfloridacomponents.com/LG188PE06/Solderless+Crimp+Terminal+.210+Yellow+Right+Angle+Ring+Lug+Thomas+%26+Betts+RC367U.html (http://www.westfloridacomponents.com/LG188PE06/Solderless+Crimp+Terminal+.210+Yellow+Right+Angle+Ring+Lug+Thomas+%26+Betts+RC367U.html)
Title: Re: Axial / 'inline' stud connector
Post by: jtw11 on Sep 06, 2013, 10:36 pm
Quote
Failing this, I suppose just bend a ring terminal 90 degrees and cover it with a boot - but, that's not directly inline. I don't like mess, some may call it OCD.


Yep, that's what I'm going to have to do - just would like a tidier solution... Tough, I guess :-)
Title: Re: Axial / 'inline' stud connector
Post by: SirNickity on Sep 07, 2013, 01:46 am
They have a Speakon connector for power.  It's yellow instead of blue I think.  Don't know exactly what the current ratings are, but it could be 100A.
Title: Re: Axial / 'inline' stud connector
Post by: Chagrin on Sep 07, 2013, 04:03 am
If you're really that OCD you could make your own connector in a fashion similar to some coax connectors or, as would be used in plumbing, a flare nut. You'd need a brass "coupling nut" and a brass washer to solder on one end of the coupling nut to constrict the ID. A steel coupling nut and washer would also work if you have access to a welder, or if you have a lathe and tap/die set just make it yourself.

To prevent the wire from pulling through the washer's ID just give it a large blob of solder. You could also do that in a neater fashion by drilling a blind hole of appropriate diameter into a block of aluminum, sticking the wire inside the hole, and then filling it with solder.
Title: Re: Axial / 'inline' stud connector
Post by: Henry_Best on Sep 07, 2013, 05:08 am

If you're really that OCD you could make your own connector in a fashion similar to some coax connectors or, as would be used in plumbing, a flare nut. You'd need a brass "coupling nut" and a brass washer to solder on one end of the coupling nut to constrict the ID. A steel coupling nut and washer would also work if you have access to a welder, or if you have a lathe and tap/die set just make it yourself.

To prevent the wire from pulling through the washer's ID just give it a large blob of solder. You could also do that in a neater fashion by drilling a blind hole of appropriate diameter into a block of aluminum, sticking the wire inside the hole, and then filling it with solder.

How do you get solder to 'stick' to aluminium?
Title: Re: Axial / 'inline' stud connector
Post by: Henry_Best on Sep 07, 2013, 05:27 am

Hello all,

In this day and age - everything seems to exist - except for what I'm after.

Of course, normal high power ring terminals exist to connect high power cables to other cables / devices / studs. However, i'm looking for an inline solution, so that the cable does not connect at right angles - I know there are of course mil-spec connectors that achieve just this - but I just want to be able to screw down a power cable inline with a power stud, such a solution would just be a simple two piece contact - however, I just can't think what the name of them would be if they exist, so can't seem to find them.

These must exist?

Failing this, I suppose just bend a ring terminal 90 degrees and cover it with a boot - but, that's not directly inline. I don't like mess, some may call it OCD.


You haven't said if you want this to be a permanent connection or a removable one.
Title: Re: Axial / 'inline' stud connector
Post by: Chagrin on Sep 07, 2013, 05:39 am


To prevent the wire from pulling through the washer's ID just give it a large blob of solder. You could also do that in a neater fashion by drilling a blind hole of appropriate diameter into a block of aluminum, sticking the wire inside the hole, and then filling it with solder.

How do you get solder to 'stick' to aluminium?

The hole acts as a mold so an even, cylindrical blob can be created on the end of the wire. The non-stickiness is the benefit of using aluminum.
Title: Re: Axial / 'inline' stud connector
Post by: MarkT on Sep 07, 2013, 05:00 pm

Nope, the solution i'm after needs to carry in excess of 100A - just like a large ring terminal bolted down against a threaded stud.



What makes you think RC connectors don't handle that kind of current?  200A with 6.5mm bullet connectors:
http://www.castlecreations.com/products/castle_connectors.html (http://www.castlecreations.com/products/castle_connectors.html)
Title: Re: Axial / 'inline' stud connector
Post by: keeper63@cox.net on Sep 07, 2013, 08:39 pm

What makes you think RC connectors don't handle that kind of current?  200A with 6.5mm bullet connectors:


The OP hasn't stated what his power source is; it may be that he wants to connect the wires inline to existing power studs on his power supply, in such a manner that standard lugs or such won't work properly (maybe due to space constraints or something).

That said, I can't think of what this power supply would be - I suppose a battery could have studs (side terminal battery have threaded lugs you bolt into; I could imagine a brass/bronze/copper stud threaded into such, then something screwed on to those - I could also imagine such a battery having similar lugs on top, instead of the standard lead terminals) - or maybe it's some kind of capacitor-based supply (I've seen larger caps with studs before).

I mean, if he really needed large amperage inline push connectors - then the connectors used on welding cable extensions would work fine...
Title: Re: Axial / 'inline' stud connector
Post by: jtw11 on Sep 08, 2013, 08:29 pm
Thanks for all your replies - however, as a few of you have read - I needed a solution to mate up to an existing power stud, so short of sending a design out for manufacture, I'll have to settle for a 90deg bend ring terminal and a slide over boot.

Cheers!