Show Posts
Pages: [1] 2
1  Using Arduino / Audio / Re: Bass beat detect on: July 07, 2013, 03:34:21 pm
Hi,

in the end I made it!

http://bochovj.wordpress.com/2013/07/07/bass-detection-with-arduino/

the FIR isn't perfect but it's still a viable solution.
2  Using Arduino / Audio / Re: Bass beat detect on: June 23, 2013, 11:06:33 am
Hi,

I am also trying to do something similar.
Basically you have three options:

1) analog filtering with something like the MSGEQ7
2) FFT analysis (there are plenty of them on the net)
3) some digital filtering, like a FIR

I am trying to follow the third option, but I want something simple and rough, like it is done here: http://www.instructables.com/id/The-LED-Matrix-Panel-or-LMP-for-the-Arduino-micr/
This guy basically implements three simple filters, but the code is poorly documented and I can't understand it very well.
As far as I have understood he sums the samples in a group of 2, 20 and 100. The more samples you add the lower the frequency, but then some magic happens that I can't understand smiley-sad

Does anyone have some suggestion?


3  International / Proyectos / Re: Comentarios sobre idea de un arduino para aplicaciones medicas on: June 16, 2013, 03:56:36 pm
Hola,

el enlace de adrianelectronics no funciona.
El tema aquí no es construir prototipos experimentales, de esto hay muchos, el tema aquí es crear la base para productos certificables y aptos para contextos clínicos.
De esto no he visto todavía mucho
4  International / Proyectos / Re: Comentarios sobre idea de un arduino para aplicaciones medicas on: June 07, 2013, 03:38:30 pm
Hola,

me alegra mucho que haya algún interesado.
La idea de un Arduino para aplicaciones medicas se me ocurrió justamente después de haber comprado el eHealth kit de cooking hacks. El kit en cuestión es muy bueno y divertido para aprender y para proyectos sin requisitos médicos, pero es algo muy de "hackers" y seguramente no utilizable en un ámbito mas clínico.
Por lo que concierne las normas para dispositivos médicos propiamente dichos en Europa vige la directiva 93/42 (http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/policies/european-standards/harmonised-standards/medical-devices/) que básicamente impone unos requisitos de calidad altos, es decir que el dispositivo no falle y que haya pruebas técnicas y clínicas.

Ahora lo que se puede proponer es un proyecto que empiece con algo sencillo, por ejemplo un sensor tipo un pulsioximetro, e intentar hacerlo "bien" sin cables sueltos o cosas así.
Otra opción podría ser empezar con un kit, tipo el de cooking hacks, para los estudiantes de ingeniería electrónica o biomedica o incluso para doctores para que puedan montar un dispositivo custom facilmente y de manera fiable. Aquí la ventaja seria que al principio no seria necesaria una certificación "fuerte".

Hay muchas maneras de empezar, creo que el primer paso seria juntar cabezas y gente interesada y generar un serio intercambio de ideas.
5  International / Generale / Re: aggiornamento wifi shield per UDP on: May 31, 2013, 10:31:29 am
Ciao,

io ci sono riuscito oggi, ti passo un messaggio dove ho scritto come ho fatto:


http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=121503.msg1260977#msg1260977

se hai dubbi chiedi pure.
6  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Attiny45/85 with WIFI on: May 31, 2013, 10:29:21 am
Hi,

it does't make much sense to have ATtiny with WIFI.
ATtiny is really "tiny" and the computing power you need for a WIFI is much higher (if you want TCP support for example). Actually the WIFI shield for the normal Arduino contains another controller which costs itself more than the Arduino nd is needed to implement the TCP IP stack.
In reality it does not make much sense to have WIFI on Arduino either, with the same combined price of Arduino + shield you can buy a RaspberryPI + a WIFI dongle and you have a proper computer.
7  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Arduino WiFi Shield UDP Support on: May 31, 2013, 08:08:29 am
Hi,

I have manage to make the UDP work properly on the WIFI shield without too much hassle.
The new version of the Arduino environment (1.0.5) already includes the WIFI shield libraries, and among its examples it has one that uses UDP: go to Examples -> WIFI -> WifiUdpNtpClient

First try:

I have just uploaded the sketch to the Arduino (after setting the proper WIFI SSID and password) but it did not work. In fact, watching at the messages on the serial port I saw:

Code:
Attempting to connect to SSID: XXXX
Connected to wifi
SSID: LST-D204
IP Address: 192.168.1.132
signal strength (RSSI):-53 dBm

Starting connection to server...
0
0
0
0
0

At some point, where in the Arduino sketch says Serial.println( Udp.parsePacket() ); it was printing me out this 0, meaning that probably the library was not supported by the firmware.



Firmware update:

Be careful about the firmware. It seems that there are two git repositories with the shield's code

this:  https://github.com/arduino/wifishield

and this: https://github.com/arduino/Arduino/tree/master/hardware/arduino/firmwares/wifishield/binary

I have used the second one, which was more recent and I think is also the one that is more official, so remember, WIFI shield's firmware is here:
https://github.com/arduino/Arduino/tree/master/hardware/arduino/firmwares/wifishield/binary !!!!!

You have to donwload the files wifi_dnld.elf and wifiHD.elf.


Then I have followed the instructions given here:

http://arduino.cc/en/Hacking/WiFiShieldFirmwareUpgrading

they are not very good, but all the steps are described at least.
As I work on Windows I had to download the Atmel's tools here http://www.atmel.com/tools/FLIP.aspx


Then I removed the shield from the Arduino, put the jumper in programming mode and connected the mini USB port to the computer.
If the driver for the AT32UC3 is not found you have it available in your computer inside the Flip folder, in my case here: C:\Program Files (x86)\Atmel\Flip 3.4.7\usb

The I have updated BOTH the HDG104 and the AT32UC3 firmwares.
For updating the HDG104 firmware type:

Code:
C:\Program Files (x86)\Atmel\Flip 3.4.7\bin>batchisp.exe -device AT32UC3A1256 -hardware usb -operation erase f memory flash blankcheck loadbuffer D:\D
ownloads\Development\Arduino\wifi_dnld.elf program verify start reset 0
(will have to change the path to the wifi_dnld.elf file that you have downloaded from the GIT repository)

you will see:

Code:
Running batchisp 1.2.5 on Fri May 31 14:17:14 2013

AT32UC3A1256 - USB - USB/DFU


Device selection....................... PASS
Hardware selection..................... PASS
Opening port........................... PASS
Reading Bootloader version............. PASS    1.0.2
Erasing................................ PASS
Selecting FLASH........................ PASS
Blank checking......................... PASS    0x00000 0x3ffff
Parsing ELF file....................... PASS    D:\Downloads\Development\Arduino\wifi_dnld.elf
WARNING: The user program and the bootloader overlap!
Programming memory..................... PASS    0x00000 0x2902b
Verifying memory....................... PASS    0x00000 0x2902b
Starting Application................... PASS    RESET   0

Summary:  Total 11   Passed 11   Failed 0


Then for updating AT32UC3 firmware you have to type:

Code:
C:\Program Files (x86)\Atmel\Flip 3.4.7\bin>batchisp.exe -device AT32UC3A1256 -hardware usb -operation erase f memory flash blankcheck loadbuffer D:\D
ownloads\Development\Arduino\wifiHD.elf program verify start reset 0

In my case, after the previous update, the board got stuck so I got:


Code:
Running batchisp 1.2.5 on Fri May 31 14:18:09 2013

AT32UC3A1256 - USB - USB/DFU


Device selection....................... PASS
Hardware selection..................... PASS
Opening port........................... AtLibUsbDfu: 3EB 2FF8 no device present.
FAIL    Could not open USB device.
ISP done.


So I just removed the USB cable and put it back again, so once again:

Code:
C:\Program Files (x86)\Atmel\Flip 3.4.7\bin>batchisp.exe -device AT32UC3A1256 -hardware usb -operation erase f memory flash blankcheck loadbuffer D:\D
ownloads\Development\Arduino\wifiHD.elf program verify start reset 0

and you'll see:

Code:
Running batchisp 1.2.5 on Fri May 31 14:26:28 2013



AT32UC3A1256 - USB - USB/DFU


Device selection....................... PASS
Hardware selection..................... PASS
Opening port........................... PASS
Reading Bootloader version............. PASS    1.0.2
Erasing................................ PASS
Selecting FLASH........................ PASS
Blank checking......................... PASS    0x00000 0x3ffff
Parsing ELF file....................... PASS    D:\Downloads\Development\Arduino\wifiHD.elf
WARNING: The user program and the bootloader overlap!
Programming memory..................... PASS    0x00000 0x3fe2b
Verifying memory....................... PASS    0x00000 0x3fe2b
Starting Application................... PASS    RESET   0

Summary:  Total 11   Passed 11   Failed 0

Good! now connect the Wifi Shield to the Arduino again and run the WifiUdpNtpClient example.
If everything works you should see on your serial port:

Code:
Attempting to connect to SSID: XXXX
Connected to wifi
SSID: LST-D204
IP Address: 192.168.1.132
signal strength (RSSI):-53 dBm

Starting connection to server...
48
packet received
Seconds since Jan 1 1900 = 3578992778
Unix time = 1370003978
The UTC time is 12:39:38

which means that everything is working smiley-wink
8  International / Proyectos / Comentarios sobre idea de un arduino para aplicaciones medicas on: March 14, 2013, 05:44:36 pm
Hola,

he tenido una idea, a ver que os parece:

existen muchos ejemplos de proyectos de HW abierto, con Arduino, aplicados a la salud. Hay de todo, desde sensores biomedicales, hasta PCR para análisis de ADN.
Que yo sepa todos estos proyecto se quedan en algo muy prototipal porque para ser utilizados clinicamente necesitarían de una alta calidad y de una certificación.
Ahora bien, se me había ocurrido que quizás tenga sentido lanzar un proyecto Open Source, basado en Ardunio de primeras, para dispositivos medicos, que tenga en cuenta requisitos de calidad que podrían, en el caso de una producción industrial, llegar a obtener una certificación.
Las ventajas serian el abaratamiento de los costes de estos dispositivos, así como la creación de una industria electrónica ligada a la salud que se basase sobre el mismo diseño compartido.
También ayudaría a la investigación ya que ingenieros e incluso doctore podrían construirse sus sensores partiendo de una placa ya pensada para ello.

Como lo veis?

9  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: DAC with high current [max 5V 400mA] on: March 10, 2013, 09:57:35 am
thank you for the diagram!!
I have ordered the valve but I haven't received it yet, as soon as I test it I will let you know.

thanks again...
10  Development / Other Hardware Development / Re: Opinions on this idea: an Open Source Ardunio based board for medical devices on: March 10, 2013, 08:18:46 am
Thanks very much for your comments.

Just to clarify my idea a little bit:

the open source community shouldn't be responsible for the certification; producers could (if they see potential business) certify a product. Actually, AFAIK, you cannot certify a prototyping board as a medical device, you can certify the final, end-user toy.
Nonetheless, the open source community should take certification as a goal scenario and take high quality requirements into account in the design.

11  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: DAC with high current [max 5V 400mA] on: March 10, 2013, 07:24:57 am
To MarkT:

the datasheet of the valve is here: http://www.clippard.com/downloads/PDF_Documents/Clippard%20Full%20Line%20Catalog/Clippard%20Catalog%20by%20Page%20Number/167-225%20Electronic%20Valves/Page%20190.pdf

it is a solenoid valve, look at this table:

Nominal Voltage Range @ 73°F (VDC)Input Current Range (amps)Coil Resistance @ 73°F (ohms)Max. Voltage Required (VDC)
0 to 50 to 0.37013.56.2
0 to 100 to 0.1855412.4

If I want to use the 5V model it will need 0.370 A as maximum current, but Arduino can only output 40mA.

Maybe something like this guy does could work?
http://bildr.org/2011/03/high-power-control-with-arduino-and-tip120/


To dc42:
are you suggesting me something like this: http://www.learningaboutelectronics.com/Articles/Unity-gain-buffer ?
The idea is to power the circuit with a battery (6V or 9V), which can be used also for powering the valve of course.


guys, thanks very much for your suggestions, if you have any further comment, examples or schematics, I would be very grateful !
12  Development / Other Hardware Development / Opinions on this idea: an Open Source Ardunio based board for medical devices on: March 09, 2013, 03:54:21 pm
Dear all,

I work in the field of biomedical engineering and I see a strong need of open source boards for biomedical applications, spanning form biology to telemedicine.
There several examples on the Internet about the application of Arduino in the medical world, (like http://openpcr.org or href="http://medicarduino.net) and even shields and components (like http://www.cooking-hacks.com/index.php/ehealth-sensor-shield-biometric-medical-arduino-raspberry-pi.html or http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/medical-c-197.html).
Now the problem is that none of these examples go beyond the pure experimentation AFAIK, so I have thought: why not to start a new project for making an open source board for medical applications with quality in mind? Arduino seems to me the perfect starting point for its wide adoption and simplicity, but the board should be particularly designed for medical applications.
The final objective would be the production of certified (FDA, CE) devices that could be used in clinical environments.

Possible applications can be:
- educational: students of biomedical engineering and even doctors who want to understand how these devices work
- research: making new devices, integrate cheap technologies
- home telemonitoring
- clinical environments, like hospitals, that want cheap but reliable devices


I am writing here to ask your opinions about the idea, do you see it feasible? do you see potential in it? do you know any other initiative like this one?

thanks for your replies..


Dario
13  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / DAC with high current [max 5V 400mA] on: March 09, 2013, 01:25:38 pm
Hi,

I would like to control a proportional valve that drains a current of 400 mA at its maximum aperture.
The principle of the proportional valve is simple: 0V -> closed, 5V -> fully open, 2.5V -> half open.

I would use the PWM output of Arduino but it wouldn't be able to output the needed current AFAIK. So I thought of some DAC chip, but those I have seen are limited in current.

Do you have any suggestion for my problem?

I don't need high precision (8 bits are more than enough).

Thanks very much in advance.

Dario
14  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Controlling a servo motor does not work (hopefully an easy one) on: May 18, 2012, 12:39:40 pm
Thanks to both of you, these posts from DuaneB are actually very good.
Now My servo is working correctly.

That recommendation about using a common ground between the power source of Arduino and the exernal one fro the servos has avoided me some headhackes smiley-grin
15  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Controlling a servo motor does not work (hopefully an easy one) on: May 15, 2012, 06:09:34 pm
That probably explains it, I am in fact powering the servo with the Arduino (Arduino powered by the USB).

I have followed this tutorial http://blog.bricogeek.com/noticias/tutoriales/tutorial-control-de-servomotores/ but there the servo is different and the Arduino is the Mega edition.
I will try with an external power source and let you know..

Thanks !
Pages: [1] 2