Show Posts
Pages: [1] 2 3 4
1  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bugs & Suggestions / Code generator, Simulator, Debugger Tool on: August 18, 2009, 05:49:49 am
I started a thread in an another section about a Code generator, simulator, debugger & I'm not sure it is the correct one so I'm posting a link to it here http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1250441884

Looking for feedback from experienced Arduino users!

Apologies for multiple postings
2  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Syntax & Programs / Re: Code Generator, debugger, Simulator on: August 17, 2009, 07:55:40 pm
No problem - it gives you a chance to try out a demo version & see how it measures up. I would be interested in an experienced Arduino user having a look at this software & see how suitable it is. Even though they won't use it themselves, it would be a useful evaluation for us noobies!

Please post your evaluations here
3  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Syntax & Programs / Re: Code Generator, debugger, Simulator on: August 16, 2009, 07:21:51 pm
Oh, found the link for AVR Demo version - they certainly don't want to publicise it widely (maybe I was harsh - see below): http://www.matrixmultimedia.com/support/viewtopic.php?t=542

Edit: Actually, here's a better link to it as well as a course they provide on uc programming http://www.matrixmultimedia.com/LearningCentre/index.php
4  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Syntax & Programs / Re: Code Generator, debugger, Simulator on: August 16, 2009, 06:43:18 pm
DaveK,
It seemed to me like a good beginners tool & there must be a lot of beginners here?

I downloaded a free version for the AVR which is a fully functioning programme only limited in no of external components it supports. This could be useful for mapping out the logic of a project?

Can't find the link to the free demo version - it isn't evident from their site - I think it's on a forum of theirs?
5  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Syntax & Programs / Re: Code Generator, debugger, Simulator on: August 16, 2009, 02:11:07 pm
Another issue is I don't want the endless cycle of compiling the code, programming the chip, & running the thing to find out it doesn't work so back to the code again & so on - you understand, I'm sure (life is too short   )

Using Flowcode (just downloaded yesterday & spent about 1 hr on it so far), I've put together a program which reads an ADC, tests a value and outputs a text string to an LCD depending on the value - all without resorting to C code. This sounds good but I don't know how it translates to the real world - only certain LCDs are supported, maybe other restrictions apply.

Maybe it's more suited for the core logic of a project rather than all the peripheral connections?
6  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Syntax & Programs / Code Generator, debugger, Simulator on: August 16, 2009, 11:58:04 am
Has anybody used Flowcode development software with the Arduino? Is there enough of a code library with Arduino that something like this is overkill for initial coding? Or is there still an advantage for simulation & debugging features?. http://www.matrixmultimedia.com/Flowcode3a-X.php

As someone coming to this with an understanding of binary, hex, etc but no C experience, I need something that gives me a coding leg up.

So Flowcode seems like a pretty good dev tool - I really like the simulation & debug aspect - it would appear to be easy to use & I like the fact that you can go with PIC, AVR or ARM uCs (not all in the one package though)and easily port between these uCs, I presume?
7  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Development / Code generator, simulator, Debugger Tool on: August 18, 2009, 05:48:05 am
I started a thread in an another section about a Code generator, simulator, debugger & I'm not sure it is the correct one so I'm posting a link to it here http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1250441884

Looking for feedback from experienced Arduino users!

Apologies for multiple postings
8  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: any pga2310 volume control examples? on: April 21, 2009, 08:30:52 pm
Thanks glt,
You identified me in one - it's easy to track us between forums when we use a consistent username.

Thanks for your input on the Buffalo thread I now understand what you meant by the difference between Vref & Vreg!

I've started a thread about this LDR issue as I didn't want to hijack this one & steer it off in another direction.

BTW, I PMed you just to introduce myself here!
9  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: any pga2310 volume control examples? on: April 21, 2009, 05:30:45 pm
New to here. Like Glt & Linux-works, I too am afflicted by the audiophile bug! ;D

I love what you guys have done to date & see a really useful tool for use as or in a preamp. [smiley=cool.gif]

I come with a slightly different requirement which you guys might be able to help me with. You have probably heard of the Lightspeed volume control device. Essentially it comprises of 2 Light Dependent Resistors (LDR) for each channel. An LDR is a simple device with an led at one end & a light sensitive resistor at the other end of an enclosed tube. By varying the current in the led the resistance (& hence signal volume) can be controlled.

The problem is that LDRs are not very tightly engineered within spec & in order for the volume between channels to track accurately LDR pairs have to be matched. This is a laborious & costly as matching needs to be done at about 3 or 4 points along the volume range to ensure the tracking is close.

So, I thought that some way of using random unmatched LDRs in this volume control could be realised if a micro controller could be used to
- firstly calibrate each LDR and store the current needed for each LDR to output the same resistance for each volume setting.
- During use as a volume control, this table could then be looked up and the correct current applied to each LDR to achieve the same output resistance.

Problem is, I don't know how feasible this is with the existing hardware? What bits & pieces I would need? How would a number stored in an array be used to drive a particular current through an led?

I guess for 4 LDRs & 99 vol settings and a byte to store each current setting then 400 byte array is needed. This needs to be stored in non-volatile memory. Two modes needed - a calibration mode & normal mode.

It seems to be a logical extension to this project however. Any pointers or help appreciated!
10  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: LED Control on: April 30, 2009, 06:39:25 pm
Thanks glt,
I have a barebones kit coming so I should be experimenting soon - I'm sure I'll be asking you some Qs then!
11  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: LED Control on: April 27, 2009, 04:50:40 pm
Ah yes but I haven't explained the application well enough:

- I don't believe the LEDs track linearly all the way up the brightness scale (& thus the vol scale) it plots a curve. That's fine, it doesn't have to be linear but different LEDs have different curves - so the offset at low vol will not be the offset at high vol.

- I want to try & get all the LEDs to track the same curve!

- Hence I believe I need an array of offsets for each LED for each vol setting & grayscale will not do as it assumes the same offset at all vol settings, I think.
12  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: LED Control on: April 27, 2009, 12:10:37 pm
Also, I'm thinking about the ATmega644P from here: http://wulfden.org/TheShoppe/freeduino/rbfk.shtml
As I will be doing my own wiring so don't really need a board as such!
Is the 644 chip fully supported in the library?

Edit: I'm guessing I may be better to stick to ATmega168, the standard chip!
13  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: LED Control on: April 27, 2009, 09:45:13 am
Thanks Grumpy, hope you don't mind me calling you that [smiley=laugh.gif] - based on your replies, I have some further Qs:
- my application will need matching of multiple LEDs at various points (0-63) from dark to full brightness - I don't think I can do this with either grayscale or dot brightness?
- (Actually, it's not the LED brightness I'm matching but the attached LDR resistance)!
- I envisage achieving this by calibrating each LED to a setting for all the 64 settings and storing the relative offsets in an array.
- Then using these offsets for the corrected PWM signal to each LED in live use for setting volume.
- For multichannel use, say 7 channels, I would need 14 LEDs.
- so my question is: for a particular volume setting I need to lookup the offset array and send the corrected PWM signal to each LED but after having sent this data to the TLC chip, I only need to toggle the chip load & blank signals?
- It's only if there is a volume change that I need to lookup the Offset array & send the new corrected PWM signal again?
- If I'm correct, this would relieve the cpu of some of the processing burden - namely the continual lookup of the offset array?
- If not using the TLC chip would there be the need to constantly renew the PWM data?

Sorry about the long & detailed questions! I know that actually doing is the best way of learning all this & I'm about to order some Arduino bits. I'm just teasing out whether I need the higher power chip or the standard?
14  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: LED Control on: April 26, 2009, 05:51:30 pm
Can I ask some more newbie questions:
- I've read the TLC5940 - is grayscale the brightness setting of the chip?
- Is dot correction a way of making all leds the same brightness at full brightness by adding/subtracting some offset?
- Does using this chip offload processing from the cpu ie. can I send a brightness setting to an led and forget about it unless I want to change the brightness again?
15  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: LED Control on: April 23, 2009, 11:03:06 am
Thanks Estranged,
I will probably try PWMAlloins first!
I'm also wondering about the Mega board as another route - 14 PWM pins out of the box (54 I/O pins) & a bit more power
I guess the final choice will depend on the final number of channels & functions that I need.

Can I also ask what is the best looking (ie looks professional) multi line LCD available?
Pages: [1] 2 3 4