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1  Using Arduino / Installation & Troubleshooting / Re: Freetronics "Eleven" (ether 10) card, uploading sketchs on: October 12, 2012, 05:35:42 am
When you say "look at the available cards", what do you mean? Are you referring to the list of Arduino models in Tools -> Board?

If that's the case, just select "Arduino Uno".
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Jon
2  Using Arduino / Installation & Troubleshooting / Re: Please can you help me? Freetronics leostick vs the Arduino Pro mini on: September 08, 2012, 06:04:49 am
Hi @topa, I see you're in Melbourne (I am too) so perhaps a good step would be to hook up with the Connected Community Hackerspace. There are a bunch of Arduino enthusiasts there and there have also been some interesting AR Drone projects, like this one I did with CCHS president Andy Gelme in January 2010:




As part of that project Andy wrote Cockatoo, which is a software layer to interface with the Parrot and allow it to be controlled via external sources (such as the gesture recognition code I was using with the Kinect).

Check out www.hackmelbourne.org
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Jon
3  Using Arduino / Installation & Troubleshooting / Re: Please can you help me? Freetronics leostick vs the Arduino Pro mini on: September 08, 2012, 03:21:23 am
Ah, I see, thanks for the link to the code. That's a pretty neat project!

@dxw00d is right, you'll need to reconcile the I/O ports and registers on the ATmega168 (used on the Pro Mini) with those on the ATmega32u4 (used on the LeoStick) which may be tricky.

For example, on line 558 of rx2atp.c there's a reference to UDR0, data register for the serial port on the ATmega168. The 32u4 uses UDR1 instead because of the built-in USB support, so you'll need to replace references in the source to "UDR0" with "UDR1".

That's just one of the changes you'll need to make, but if you can match up the 168 and 32u4 ports you should be able to work through the errors and fix them up.

You've selected quite a complex project to get started with if you're just beginning with Arduino!
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Jon
4  Using Arduino / Installation & Troubleshooting / Re: Please can you help me? Freetronics leostick vs the Arduino Pro mini on: September 08, 2012, 01:46:39 am
It'd help a lot of you provided a link to the sketch you're wanting to run, or paste it into a post. If there's nothing unusual in it, it may be as simple as selecting the correct board type before clicking "upload" and it'll all just work. Without knowing what you're trying to run, though, it's hard to provide specific assistance. It sounds like you already have the board profile working OK if you've uploaded Blink to the LeoStick, so the rest should be pretty easy.
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Jon
5  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: Freetronics eleven VS Arduino Uno R3 on: July 24, 2012, 05:17:27 pm
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It has an ATmega16U2 instead of an 8U2, and breaks out an extra four pins.

Yes, true for the current version of the Eleven. However, the ElevenR3 is on its way: the first thousand have been assembled already, and they'll replace the Eleven as stock runs down. The R3 version has the R3 headers (of course!), microUSB instead of miniUSB, and a 16u2.

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If you really want to play with USB, then get a board that allows you to play with USB in the sketch
vs having to mess with the USB to serial interface chip.

To make really small USB devices there's also the LeoStick, which is basically a Leonardo in memory-stick form factor:

www.freetronics.com/leostick
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Jon
6  Development / Other Hardware Development / Re: Suggestions about Mega-equivalent with built-in Ethernet on: October 17, 2011, 07:06:40 pm
Yes, it's been a long, long, ... long time coming, but the EtherMega has finally made the leap from bits to atoms:



That pic has been cleaned up a bit in Photoshop and had the "sticker" added to the RJ45 jack, but at least it shows that it's now an actual physical device.

Some things of note:

PCB Colour. The picture above shows a design-validation sample so the PCB colours aren't correct: the production units will be in the usual Freetronics colours with yellow markings.

Power supply. The reason for the big delay between the last update and getting to this point has been swapping out the linear reg for a switchmode supply. You'd think it would be simple, but no, it turned out to have all sorts of side-effects! The supply we've used is rated up to 28V input, which means you can connect it to any handy power supply in the 6-24Vdc range and it'll just work without causing overheating problems. Current model boards with a linear regulator and an Ethernet shield run a tight-rope between getting enough power to run the Ethernet chip (which requires a good, solid 5V) and overheating the reg. Because I tend to mount Arduinos in odd places (inside walls, etc) it's important to me to have a board that runs cold, so I was determined to go with the switchmode supply even though it caused big delays.

Power source selection. Near the upper left of the board you'll see a 3-way male header with a jumper fitted. That's to select the power source between USB and DC IN. Yes, we dropped the power auto-select. Sorry. One of the big complications with the switchmode supply is that the chip can't handle a back-voltage being applied to its output, so with the traditional supply auto-switching circuit the chip gets fried the moment you plug in USB power. Bummer. In the end a simple jumper was the most robust solution. We looked at switches to use instead, and found that tiny switches able to fit on the board just aren't rated to the 300mA+ that would be required. In fact most of the tiny surface-mount switches you see are only rated to about 20 - 30mA! So, a jumper it is.

Soooo close. The first batch of production units will begin any day now.
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Jon
Freetronics: www.freetronics.com
7  Community / Bar Sport / Re: My dream home workshop: construction is underway on: September 04, 2011, 08:30:49 am
That post had me rather puzzled! I read it about 4 times trying to figure out what on earth it was getting at, and gave up.

So far my whole family is still living in the workshop, so it's not being used for its intended purpose yet. In the last couple of weeks there's been good progress on plastering ("drywall") in the main house so we're probably only about 2 weeks away from moving back in, which will be another step out of the nightmare of the last 18 months of having a barely usable house. I'm still collecting gear for the new workshop (just got a desoldering station last week because they were on special at a local supplier) but it's all sitting around waiting for somewhere that it can be set up.
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Jon
8  Development / Other Hardware Development / Re: Arduino prototype on: August 11, 2011, 01:32:18 am
Or if you want one that follows the Arduino form factor more closely (including headers in the same place for shield compatibility) there's also this one, which has a small prototyping area inside the standard Arduino shape:

www.freetronics.com/eleven
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Jon
9  Development / Other Hardware Development / Re: Suggestions about Mega-equivalent with built-in Ethernet on: July 28, 2011, 10:23:37 pm
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However, my priorities would be fitting with the Mega dimensions, having the proto area, and compatibility with existing library.

That was exactly my thinking. What I wanted was a board that's like a Mega, an Ethernet shield, and a (small) proto shield all squashed into one as a drop-in 100% compatible replacement.

I'm still interested in ideas that deviate from that though, because there could be other specialised versions to follow if there's enough interest.
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Jon
10  Development / Other Hardware Development / Re: Suggestions about Mega-equivalent with built-in Ethernet on: July 28, 2011, 08:29:09 am
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why not go for switch mode regulator?

I'd love to do that. Our assembler is currently checking availability and price on a couple of parts, including the EUP3410 and EUP3452A on this page: http://www.eutechmicro.com/PL_9_11_EN.html

If it turns out I can go switchmode for a minimal impact on BOM cost (and it fits!) I'll do it.
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Jon
11  Development / Other Hardware Development / Re: Suggestions about Mega-equivalent with built-in Ethernet on: July 28, 2011, 08:25:57 am
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Suggest making the proto area 2 pins longer, to accept at least 1 20-pin DIP.

That's going to be hard but I'll see if I can squash in a couple more.

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have a look and see if it's possible to place two connections on the TOSC pins in the chip.

Cool idea. I wouldn't populate it by default, but watch crystals are tiny so I should be able to bring out a couple of pads to solder the flying leads onto. I'll give that a go.

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are the Pwr and D13 LEDs different colours?

Yes, blue for power and red for D13, same as on the EtherTen.
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Jon
12  Development / Other Hardware Development / Re: Suggestions about Mega-equivalent with built-in Ethernet on: July 27, 2011, 05:06:47 pm
@bubulindo:
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Why not connecting it with the external memory bus?

I don't understand. What external memory bus? Care to elaborate?

@nootropic:
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There is a via under one of your crystals (connected to GND I believe?).  Just thought I'd mention it in case it was not intentional.

That's a very good point, you're right that it's something to be careful of. In this case it's OK because as you point out it's a GND connection, so it doesn't matter if it shorts against the crystal case. The plan with production of this PCB is to have all the vias "tented" (covered with soldermask) but even with tenting it's a good idea to not put vias where they could short out. A via under tenting is still a structural weak point for the soldermask and there's the danger of the connection being exposed.

In any case that particular part of the PCB is being shoved sideways a bit to make room to route those last few airwires!
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Jon
13  Development / Other Hardware Development / Re: Suggestions about Mega-equivalent with built-in Ethernet on: July 27, 2011, 07:40:26 am
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shouldn't that be 7-20V?

No, that's deliberate. The combo of the pair of MCUs and the Wiznet Ethernet chipset draws a significant amount of current, and supplying anything more than about 12V to the onboard linear regulator can push it closer to the thermal limit than I like: particularly if you stack another shield on top that draws lots of current, such as an LCD shield with a backlight. A combination of boards like an Uno with an Arduino Ethernet Shield and an LCD shield has the same problem. If you feed it 10V it'll be quite happy. At 12V the reg gets very warm, and at 20V it would almost certainly go into thermal shutdown.

You *can* feed it more, but the 7-10V range indicated on the overlay is a recommendation that gives a bit of a safety margin.
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Jon
14  Development / Other Hardware Development / Suggestions about Mega-equivalent with built-in Ethernet on: July 27, 2011, 05:10:39 am
I'm just about to go to production with a Mega version of the EtherTen (http://www.freetronics.com/etherten), but it's not too late to make last-minute changes so I'd be very interested in any suggestions. It does everything the EtherTen does (including Power-over-Ethernet, microSD slot, etc) but with more I/O and an ATmega2560 MCU. It also has a small prototyping area which should be handy for single-board sensor / control projects, and I've specifically broken out the I2C connections next to the proto area.

There are still a couple of airwires and some minor pushing and shoving to do, but it's getting quite close:



Obviously it still needs header labels etc sorted out.

Yes, the microSD slot is in a very strange location (right in the middle of the board) but I couldn't figure anywhere better to put it. The Mega has headers and other connectors all the way around the perimeter, so there's just nowhere to put it that overlaps an edge. Hopefully it won't be too much of a pain.

So, any wishlist items or suggestions before I crank out the Gerbers and start production?
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Jonathan Oxer
Practical Arduino: www.practicalarduino.com
15  Development / Other Hardware Development / Re: Next revision of Arduino approx date? on: July 19, 2011, 01:36:16 am
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All I was trying to say is I wish it could connect to a PC without the use of the FTDI adapter cable, like the Uno and Mega do

There's always the Freetronics EtherTen, which has been out for quite a while now and has more features:

www.freetronics.com/etherten
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Jon
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