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211  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: Sewable Pads in Eagle?! on: September 28, 2010, 12:01:43 am
Does the library have any parts in it? Try opening it directly from within Eagle (using File -> Open -> Library from the management pane, not from the project) and browsing through the parts.

If it doesn't have any parts in it, perhaps you skipped the "Collect data" step?
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Jon
212  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: Sewable Pads in Eagle?! on: September 27, 2010, 11:11:46 pm
Because Eagle projects are self-contained including all the data related to parts used in them (rather than just referencing a library at run-time) it's possible to extract a part from a project even if you don't have the library that was used to create it.

Open the project in Eagle, go into the board layout (not the schematic), and from the menu select "File -> Run...". You'll see a huge list of included scripts that can be executed. Find the script called "exp-project-lbr.ulp" and run it. You'll see a screen that gives you some options about generating a new library using the parts found in that project. Click the "Collect data" button to make it populate its list from the project, then "Create library" to actually save it.

You'll now have a library containing just the parts that were in that project, and can use it in your other projects.

Note that this is a technical solution, and I haven't mentioned anything about the legality of it. If the original library was for restricted use it's possible you're not allowed to use it in this way, but I expect that anything created specifically for the Lilypad was likely to be under some open licence anyway.
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Jon
Power-over-Ethernet injector: http://www.freetronics.com/poe-injector-4ch
213  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: new layout frontpage arduino.cc on: September 25, 2010, 06:13:46 am
Don't jump to conclusions! I'm sure that's a temporary "splash" page that will be replaced by the proper home page when the new design launches.

I really like those new colours, by the way, and the packaging design concept shown on Massimo's blog post look fantastic.
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Jon
Ethernet shield with PoE support: www.freetronics.com/ethernet-shield
214  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: Flip Gerber files...? on: August 27, 2010, 05:30:42 pm
Don't worry, you're certainly not the first person to do that!

I don't know specifically about in Fritzing, but depending on how you'll be fabricating the actual board you may be able to fix it after generating the artwork. Are you going to fab these boards yourself or send the Gerbers off to a commercial fab house? If you're doing something like optical transfer or the "iron the toner onto the board" technique it's just a matter of flipping the graphic in a paint program after generating it.
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Jon
Freetronics: www.freetronics.com
215  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: An Idea I'll Probably Make Someday on: August 27, 2010, 06:09:24 am
@Meinaart: Yes, that's exactly what I was suggesting.
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Jon
216  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: An Idea I'll Probably Make Someday on: August 26, 2010, 09:26:27 pm
Even if they don't use CAPTCHA I think you'll find that you can't use an Arduino to retrieve the HTML interface and parse it to extract the info you want. I just checked the FedEx tracking page, and the response page from submitting a tracking request is over 30K!

You'll need to get the Arduino talking to an API that can provide a very lightweight version of the data, not talking directly to the carrier's public website.
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Jon
217  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: An Idea I'll Probably Make Someday on: August 26, 2010, 08:47:46 pm
All the package tracking services I've seen use CAPTCHA or similar specifically to *stop* people writing scripts that periodically check shipping status. If you can find a tracking service that provides an API you may be able to do this directly with an Arduino, but if you are scraping an HTML interface you'll probably find that you can't do enough string processing and pattern matching in the Arduino to make it feasible. You'd need an external program running on a PC or something to do the scraping and present sanitised data to the Arduino, in which case the Arduino is nothing but a glorified additional display.

Hmmm, thinking about it, you could set up a web service yourself that scrapes the tracking site and then exposes the data as a simple API for the Arduino to consume.
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Jon
Practical Arduino: www.practicalarduino.com
218  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: Your dream electronics lab? on: August 26, 2010, 06:15:08 am
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Or with socks on

Heh, don't make me visualise that   :-(

As far as flooring goes I like @cr0sh's suggestion of industrial lino, particularly if it's not too late to combine it with underfloor heating. I may still be able to arrange that. What I don't like about hard floors normally is that in winter months when the slab is cold, it seeps up through your feet and leaves you feeling rusty even if the air itself in the room is a nice temperature. Underfloor heating obviously solves that.

By the way, I was pointed to this by someone on Twitter, Ben's "Super Work Bench 2009":

http://benheck.com/06-28-2009/super-work-bench-2009

Really nice setup.
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Jon
219  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: Your dream electronics lab? on: August 25, 2010, 09:09:45 pm
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Compressed air at your workstations

@BroHogan: That's an interesting idea. I hadn't thought of that at all. Can you explain why you find it so useful?

Quote
proper lighting

@Pauly: Yes, that's the first thing one of my friends mentioned when I asked him this question too. I'm intending to provide a very high level of overall ambient light using flouros distributed across the ceiling, and supplement it with movable lights over the workspaces.

@cr0sh: Brilliant suggestions! Movable large bench, double door access, climate control, all going on my list for sure. I already have a server rack at home so that'll probably be moving into the garage just on the other side of the wall from the workshop, keeping the noisy fans out of general earshot but with the machines easy to access. Containers are definitely important too. When I was working on Practical Arduino I bought a heap of plastic kitchen containers which I've found to be really helpful for keep stuff grouped together for small projects:

http://www.practicalarduino.com/news/id/121

I've also bought about 15 larger tubs (20 liter capacity) which are wide / long but quite shallow. They're great for storing more bulky things so I have one dedicated to USB cables, another for Ethernet cables, one for plastic cases, one for hard disks, etc.

In terms of actual construction the builders are now at the point of doing the footings for the concrete slab. By next week the foundations will be in and they'll be starting to work on the frame. It's been freezing cold and way too much rain over the last week though so things have been held up a bit. Can't pour concrete in the rain.
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Jon
220  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: Your dream electronics lab? on: August 25, 2010, 06:53:00 am
Quote
stock

Yes! I have drawers and cupboards and boxes and shelves full of bits accumulated over the years, so one of the best things about having a dedicated workshop will be having somewhere to keep them all easily accessible. Right now they're spread all over the house and I can never find anything when I need it.
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Jon
221  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Your dream electronics lab? on: August 25, 2010, 02:16:53 am
I'm in the rather lucky position right now of having a purpose-built electronics lab included in a home extension we're building. Yay! The thing is that I need ideas for the best way to set it up. It's reasonably large (about 6m x 5m, or 18' x 15') with a bit taken out of one corner for a small toilet / sink area, so after years of working on the kitchen table or anywhere I can find a flat surface it's a dream come true.

A quick brain-dump goes something like this:
  • General purpose soldering / testing workstation
  • SMD workstation (microscope, oven, hot-air tools)
  • Computer workstation (triple-head system for Eagle-joy!)
  • General purpose bench for mechanical work (non-dirty)
  • Keep dirty work (drilling, etc) in separate room
  • Photography area with light-tent and good lighting
  • Sound-proofing in walls so tools etc can be used late at night without disturbing the neighbors
  • Cabled Ethernet and wifi for visitors
  • Bar fridge to store solder paste, snacks, and drinks
  • Solder fume extractors vented externally
  • Lots of overhead storage

Floor surface? I'm conflicted on that. A hard surface is best for cleaning and finding parts if you drop them, but it's not so cosy on cold days and it can be hard on the feet. Easier to slide around on a chair though.

So, if you were setting up your dream lab at home, what would be important to you? What am I missing?

Jon
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Freetronics: www.freetronics.com
222  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: Post Your Venting (Letting Out Your Anger) Here! on: August 23, 2010, 10:15:06 pm
Hey @Sparks, do I get bonus nerd points for knowing exactly what you were quoting without having to look it up?
223  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Uno Punto Zero / Re: Uno reference image on: September 27, 2010, 07:14:54 am
I noticed that too when I first saw the photo, but assumed that the chip itself was oriented differently on the Uno compared to the Duemilanove. But no, I just checked the Eagle files and it does seem that the MCU is inserted backwards on the board in the reference pic!

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Jon
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