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1  Community / Bar Sport / Re: In need of Instant Karma! on: September 27, 2014, 04:19:38 pm
You know what they say tho: Instant karma's gonna get you. Gonna knock you right on the head.

I think it kicked me in the ass.  smiley-sad
2  Community / Bar Sport / Re: Altium will soon be free on: September 27, 2014, 02:26:49 am
The only free thing here is the cost to Altium to use of your designs.

Quote
While Altium remains committed to listening to its users about improving products or services, you understand that any ideas, inventions or materials (collectively, “Materials”) that you submit to Altium using the Website shall become the exclusive property of Altium and by submitting the same you relinquish all rights in the Materials upon their submission and waive any right to hold Altium liable for its use of or failure to use such Materials in any way.

That's really their wording?  This is for the free CAD software?  They way they write it, it sounds like you can't even use your own design once you submit it unless they license it back to you (and it is not explained here how they do that).  I'd stay very far away.
3  Community / Bar Sport / In need of Instant Karma! on: September 27, 2014, 01:47:23 am
Karma my ass, please.

I figure if they can beg on Kickstarter, I can beg here.

Let's see how this goes.  So far: 14.
4  Community / Bar Sport / Re: Altium will soon be free on: September 27, 2014, 12:22:39 am
Sounds like their MBAs are desperately trying to suicide this version of the software and my money is on them succeeding.
5  Community / Bar Sport / Re: ARM Cortex-M7 on: September 27, 2014, 12:20:56 am
For sure.  16/20MHz at up to 1MIPS per MHz is nothing to sneeze at.  My first PC was about the same speed.

Often, I find it's just lack of memory that holds them back... but even in 2K, you can do a lot.

It's worth noting that though the original set of "home" computers like the Apple II / C64 / Atari 800 / Tandy Computers had up to  64K RAM, but this was for program as well as variable space.  The ATMEGA with 32K flash plus 2K RAM is more comparable to a 32K first generation computer unless the program is especially RAM intensive.  And those computers were mostly 1.5Mhz-2.0Mhz with 2 or 3 clock cycles per instruction.  Atmel's current 8 bits run rings around that.
6  Community / Bar Sport / Re: ARM Cortex-M7 on: September 24, 2014, 04:48:51 am
Some ARMs already have FPUs.  Atmel's ARM controllers with an FPU (SAM "G") are in the link below..  I don't know how great they are, I am sure they are nothing as good as Intel's.  Atmel has a FPU option on the AVR32 also ("C" series).

http://www.atmel.com/products/microcontrollers/arm/sam-g.aspx
http://www.atmel.com/products/microcontrollers/avr/32-bitavruc3.aspx  
7  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Help with small electronics project on: September 24, 2014, 04:22:44 am
I would want to see what the power rail looked like when that motor was running.  I would think you might want a few extra caps prior to the Arduino to smooth out any fluctuations that the motor will cause.  But, I think the bigger problem may be that motor going off line.  The motor is inductive and switching it off causes a voltage spike on the power rail.  I think you will want a flyback diode across the motor.
8  Community / Bar Sport / Re: Who hasn't accidentally touched a mains voltage once or twice? on: September 19, 2014, 04:51:04 am
(Yeah, like electrocuting the recipient!)

Recipient being you or them?  If them, they were not seeing that voltage, the telco's equipment was seeing it.  I actually wonder how the telco protects their equipment from that sort of thing (and lightening too).  Zeners, maybe...
9  Community / Bar Sport / Re: Who hasn't accidentally touched a mains voltage once or twice? on: September 17, 2014, 12:54:57 am
You know, the point to this thread was to determine if anyone had NEVER touched a mains voltage.  No takers so far.  I wonder if they exist.  We hear that mains voltage is so incredibly dangerous, yet everyone has touched it at least once or twice.  Even in my talking to non electrical nerds this is the case even among the general population.  So why aren't more people fried?  I think the danger is overblown unless you are soaked in salt water.  But, my middle name is still Danger.
10  Community / Bar Sport / Re: Who hasn't accidentally touched a mains voltage once or twice? on: September 16, 2014, 03:54:05 am
The other thousand people are not posting because they're dead smiley

The reason I asked is because this has happened to me several times and frankly, I am underwhelmed.  Now, I was never drenched in salt water and standing in a puddle when this happened, but still.  I do wonder about the people in 240V countries.  I have to imagine that the voltage is substantially more dangerous there.
11  Community / Bar Sport / Re: When did 'bugs' become 'glitches' on: September 15, 2014, 03:12:30 am
About ten minutes into "Robocop".

Fun glitch.  Sometimes extreme violence is entertaining if the person getting violated is an extreme asswipe.  smiley-red
12  Community / Bar Sport / Re: Lead free solder on: September 15, 2014, 03:10:19 am
Iv heard that lead free solder is an environmental disaster as the extra tin mining generates more pollution than is saved.

Anyone got a link to documented fact please.

Yes i have tried google.

I don't think the calculus being employed was ever what was more polluting or not.  It's what is more toxic to humans or not.  Still, I like leaded solder.  Damn the torpedoes!
13  Community / Bar Sport / Who hasn't accidentally touched a mains voltage once or twice? on: September 15, 2014, 03:07:40 am
Maybe I am accident-prone, but I think I have touched a US mains voltage (120VAC RMS) at least half a dozen times in my life.  It's not fun, but I am not hardly dead either.  I have always sort of assume everyone else has.  Wires get frayed.  Little kids are overly enthusiastic about putting keys into small holes (that was the worst one).  Shit happens.  Any of you somehow completely avoided doing this?
14  Community / Bar Sport / Re: Your latest purchase on: September 15, 2014, 01:11:17 am
One thing that pisses me off is that the "programmer" on the USB sticks cannot be used to program bare chips.  The bare chips have to be flashed with a bootloader first which requires a "real" programmer.  .

Now, now...http://www.cypress.com/?id=4&rID=98796

Disclaimer... Have not tried it!

Ray

Thanks.  I will give this a shot tomorrow to program a dev board that I made via these pins and I will get back to you all on if it worked or not.
15  Community / Bar Sport / Re: Your latest purchase on: September 14, 2014, 03:03:34 am
PSoC 4200:  I bought a 10 of the chips at $1 from Cypress and also bought 3 of their $4 CY8CKIT-049 development USB sticks.  One thing that pisses me off is that the "programmer" on the USB sticks cannot be used to program bare chips.  The bare chips have to be flashed with a bootloader first which requires a "real" programmer.  The cheapest programmer is the MiniProg3 which is $90 and it doesn't look like there are cheap clones on eBay (as there are for so many architectures).  That really irritates me.  I thought I was going to be able to get away with using the  CY8CKIT-049 as a programmer (not as a debugger or emulator though) and I didn't understand the whole bootloader B.S.  Honestly, I thought bootloaders more of an Arduino thing than a normal professional strategy and frankly I have used real programmers/debuggers for everything else other than Arduino.  It's just that I have always been able to get super cheap programmers before.  I don't want to pay $90 just to evaluate a chip.  Not happy.  Did get it to change the blinkenlights speed, though (i.e. the IDE works for me fine with the  CY8CKIT-049).  Still, I would rather work off the board I built out of these now useless bare ICs.
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