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46  General Category / General Discussion / Re: What are the applications suitable for 32-bit Arduino Due? on: March 18, 2013, 12:57:12 pm
I strongly believe that a 32-bit Arduino Due Is capable of controlling a spaceship visiting the moon and guide it back to Earth afterwards if programmed very well.  smiley-yell
47  Topics / Product Design / Re: Moving from the uno to programming AVRs. Please recommend on: March 18, 2013, 12:52:04 pm
Here is an awesome guide on how to program little Atmel chips:
http://hlt.media.mit.edu/?p=1695

Another Tutorial:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Program-an-ATtiny-with-Arduino/
48  Using Arduino / Sensors / Re: Accelerometer output unsteady on: March 18, 2013, 12:44:35 pm
I had the same Accelerometer and same problem. The Accelerometer is very simple to use and good for beginners. I had the same problem when I hooked it up to the breadboard. But then i got much better results when I actually soldered it to some wires. I think this is because conductivity increase when you solder the wires to it plus they stop disconnecting.

Here is some reference, I suggest connecting it with special wires or soldering it:
http://www.geeetech.com/wiki/index.php/MMA7361_Triple_Axis_Accelerometer_Breakout

I also used this tutorial but it's in French. Use Google Translate to translate it into English:
http://sebarduino.blogspot.com/2011/07/mma7361.html

Hope this helps!
49  Using Arduino / Sensors / Re: Parallax Si1143 Proximity Sensor on: March 18, 2013, 12:37:11 pm
Try this topic:

http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/topic,28134.0.html
50  Using Arduino / Installation & Troubleshooting / Re: short 5V and GND on: March 18, 2013, 12:32:53 pm
This is a normal thing. The light goes off because the Arduino is "suffering" from the high current and resets. You have done this one time, try not to do it again. Short exposures are Ok but its better to avoid them. However, long exposure between the 5v and GND may lead to a broken board so try not to repeat it. 
51  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Accessing Arduino USB remotely on: March 18, 2013, 12:28:11 pm
You could program your Arduino wirelessly using the the Xbee. They come in different configurations, ranges and price.

https://www.sparkfun.com/categories/111
52  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: from displacement to velocity on: March 18, 2013, 12:21:30 pm
Give us some more example of your work if you have any. Such as some code and circuit configuration.
53  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: wireless switch closing? JamMan looper on: March 18, 2013, 12:17:41 pm
For beginning, I strongly recommend using these RF link antennas.

https://www.sparkfun.com/products/10534 - RF Link Transmitter (434MHz) from SparkFun for about 4$
https://www.sparkfun.com/products/10532 - RF Link Receiver (434MHz) from SparkFun for about 5$

http://www.ebay.com/itm/315Mhz-WL-RF-transmitter-and-receiver-link-kit-for-Arduino-ARM-MCU-/370776247168?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5653fc8b80
Ebay Just $1.50 a pair!

My post on this topic might help. Take a look smiley
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/topic,154520.msg1159644.html#msg1159644
54  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: transistors? on: March 18, 2013, 12:12:19 pm
They all work the same but just vary in quality and current handling.
55  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Arduino web server ideas. on: March 18, 2013, 12:10:00 pm
I think you could use the Arduino IDE language println(); function and just put the readings and HTML code inside it.

For example: to display a text you could do the following:

Code:
print("<h3> Reading from termometer is: " );
print(analogRead(A0));
println(</h3>);

print("<h3> Humidity is: " );
print(analogRead(A1));
println(</h3>);
56  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: Analog control of 15 outputs - Beginner question on: March 18, 2013, 11:01:04 am
As Grumpy_Mike you would certainly need some additional hardware to handle all of those outputs.That's a separate task to deal with.  smiley-roll

Setting up the digital input won't be a problem. Here is an example of setting up a digital input using a button and a 10K resistor:  
http://arduino.cc/en/tutorial/button smiley

Or if you don't have a 10K resistor you could use the internal pull-up resistor right on the Arduino which would save up some wiring. Here is a video tutorial:
http://youtu.be/jJnD6LdGmUo

Also be aware that Arduino Mini has only 6 PWM outputs and you need 15 of them which means you would need some extension for that too. That's something hard for me to explain since I have no good knowledge in that.  smiley-roll-sweat

I could guide you through the  "system for simple syntax of this control" as I like it how you call it, very formal.  smiley-wink

First of all, you could create your own function. Here is a link to it if you won't understand my explanation:
http://arduino.cc/en/Reference/FunctionDeclaration

So you want: (LED#, color, brightness). Lets create a function and call it "rgbControl" and let it control some of the attributes.
Note: I will separate the color section into three sections, R, G and B. I will remove the LED number in you proposal but you can add it any time

Code:
void  rgbControl(int r, int g, int b, float brightness){
  // let's say the RGB led has its RGB pins on number 1,2 and 3
  // Input the brightness in percentages
  analogWrite(1,(r*brightness/100)); // lets set its red value
  analogWrite(2,(g*brightness/100)); // lets set its green value
  analogWrite(3,(b*brightness/100)); // lets set its  blue value
}

Put this code before or after the loop() function (not in the function). And in the loop() itself you could write something like

This will give you a red at a 50% brightness:
Code:
rgbControl(256,0,0,50);

This will give you a green at a 80% brightness:
Code:
rgbControl(0,256,0,80);

This will give you a red at a 100% brightness:
Code:
rgbControl(0,0,256,100);


The final sketch may look something like:
Code:

void setup () {
}

void loop () {
  rgbControl(256,0,0,50); //This will give you a red at a 50% brightness:
  rgbControl(0,0,0,0);    //Set values to off
  rgbControl(0,256,0,80); //This will give you a green at a 80% brightness:
  rgbControl(0,0,0,0);    //Set values to off
  rgbControl(0,0,256,100); //This will give you a red at a 100% brightness:
  rgbControl(0,0,0,0);     //Set values to off
}
void  rgbControl(int r, int g, int b, float brightness){
  // let's say the RGB led has its RGB pins on number 1,2 and 3
  // Input the brightness in percentages
  analogWrite(1,(r*brightness/100)); // lets set its red value
  analogWrite(2,(g*brightness/100)); // lets set its green value
  analogWrite(3,(b*brightness/100)); // lets set its  blue value
}

I hope this will get you started. If you have questions just ask smiley
57  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: only 1V on output on: March 18, 2013, 10:02:39 am
You have to add the pinMode() function in the setup. By defualt, if you are not going to pinMode() it, the pin would output a small voltage on its HIGH instead of 5Volts.
58  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: millis() push button LED timer demo example coding on: March 18, 2013, 10:01:03 am
In your code the millis() function keeps on counting and doesn't reset. Is that what you want? Or you want it to reset when you press the button?
59  Using Arduino / Displays / Re: Sparkfun 16x2 LCD and wire length limit? on: March 18, 2013, 09:48:57 am
I don't think the length of a wire would be an issue with the LCD screen. I think libraries that are written for the LCD could handle any length.
60  Topics / Product Design / Re: 3d Arduino's models on: March 18, 2013, 09:45:09 am
You could get them on google for the Google Sketchup program. Here are some models:

http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/search?q=arduino&styp=m&scoring=t&btnG=Search
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