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31  Community / Workshops and Events / Re: Searching for someone that could talk to us about Arduino on: June 07, 2011, 04:35:12 pm
I would love to do it, alas I am in Canada! smiley-grin

32  Community / Workshops and Events / E-Textiles/Wearable Tech Workshop Series in Toronto, Canada on: June 07, 2011, 04:30:15 pm
Please find below information for a workshop series in Wearable Tech/E-textiles hosted at Interaccess Electronic Media Arts Centre in Toronto, Canada.
If you have any questions, please PM me!


http://interaccess.org/workshops/series.php

WEARABLES MINI SERIES
Intro to Sewing*
When: Tuesday, June 14th, 7-10pm
Instructor: Rosie Spooner
Price: $45 ($35 InterAccess members)

About the workshop: This workshop will introduce the basics of sewing, both by hand and using a domestic sewing machine. We will make small bags that participants can take away with them, and also use at the next two wearables workshops where they will learn how to soup up their sewn creations with sensors and LEDs. This workshop is designed to partner with both Intro to Wearable Technologies & Soft Circuits and Intro to Arduino, teaching participants the introductory sewing skills needed for these two workshops, as well as basic, handy sewing tips and techniques like making button holes, sewing in zippers and following patterns.

About the instructor: ROSIE SPOONER is a Toronto-based independent curator and historian. She holds degrees from the University of Glasgow and the University of Bristol, where her work focused on transnational cultural studies, oral history and public history. She has worked at the Centre for Contemporary Art (Glasgow) and the Museum of Bristol and is currently InterAccess' Gallery & Membership Coordinator.

Intro to Wearable Technologies & Soft Circuits*
When: Tuesday, June 21st, 7-10pm
Instructors: Ken Leung & Erin Lewis
Price: $45 ($35 InterAccess members)

About the workshop: Soft circuits are electronic circuits made wearable through the use of conductive thread and conductive fabric. In wearable electronics, circuitry design and application are made with the body in mind.

This workshop will introduce you to the world of wearable conductive materials as well as specific techniques for their application on the body. You will learn to construct soft analog components such as wearable switches, flex and force sensors, soft pressure matrices and even fuzzy, directional 'stroke' sensors. You will also learn to think about the body and its movements in an entirely different way: as a means to actuate electronics!

This workshop is great for crafters, makers, DIYers, electronic hobbyists, and anyone looking to include the dimension of the body and soft analog electronics into their projects.

About the instructors: ERIN LEWIS is an emerging artist who is currently studying Integrated Media at OCAD University, with a minor in Wearable Technology. She works predominately with electronics and video in an installation setting. Erin has released video work with the National Film Board of Canada, exhibited work in Nuit Blanche, and conducted live video performances across Toronto and Europe. She enjoys grapes, kittens, and real-time data feeds.

KEN LEUNG is a multidisciplinary designer and artist residing in Toronto with strong interests in wearable technology, physical computing, and interface design. Ken's interactive work has been exhibited at Nuit Blanche, The Gladstone Hotel, and Harbourfront Center, and he is currently working with the Mobile Experience Lab and Social Body Lab at OCAD on various locative and wearables projects. Ken has a background in Psychology, computer programming, digital media, and Industrial design.

Intro to Lilypad Arduino*
When: Tuesday, June 28th, 7-10pm
Instructors: Ken Leung & Erin Lewis
Price: $45 ($35 InterAccess members)

About the workshop: The Lilypad Arduino is a programmable microcontroller specially designed for use in wearable tech and e-textiles projects.

In this workshop, we will introduce you to the Lilypad and its suite of sensors and accessories, teach you how to interface the Lilypad with soft circuits, and guide you through the basics of writing Arduino code to add fun interactive behaviors to your wearables projects. Hands-on exercises and a variety of example projects will be used to explore the exciting possibilities of this technology.

About the instructors: Please see above.

* Certain materials will be needed for these three wearables workshops, which participants can either bring with them or purchase at InterAccess. Please enquire about the material list and costs when enrolling for any of the workshops in the Wearables Mini Series.
33  Topics / E-Textiles and Craft / Wearable Tech Workshop Series in Toronto, Canada on: June 07, 2011, 04:29:03 pm
Please find below information for a workshop series in Wearable Tech/E-textiles hosted at Interaccess Electronic Media Arts Centre in Toronto, Canada.
If you have any questions, please PM me!

http://interaccess.org/workshops/series.php

Intro to Sewing*
When: Tuesday, June 14th, 7-10pm
Instructor: Rosie Spooner
Price: $45 ($35 InterAccess members)

About the workshop: This workshop will introduce the basics of sewing, both by hand and using a domestic sewing machine. We will make small bags that participants can take away with them, and also use at the next two wearables workshops where they will learn how to soup up their sewn creations with sensors and LEDs. This workshop is designed to partner with both Intro to Wearable Technologies & Soft Circuits and Intro to Arduino, teaching participants the introductory sewing skills needed for these two workshops, as well as basic, handy sewing tips and techniques like making button holes, sewing in zippers and following patterns.

About the instructor: ROSIE SPOONER is a Toronto-based independent curator and historian. She holds degrees from the University of Glasgow and the University of Bristol, where her work focused on transnational cultural studies, oral history and public history. She has worked at the Centre for Contemporary Art (Glasgow) and the Museum of Bristol and is currently InterAccess' Gallery & Membership Coordinator.

Intro to Wearable Technologies & Soft Circuits*
When: Tuesday, June 21st, 7-10pm
Instructors: Ken Leung & Erin Lewis
Price: $45 ($35 InterAccess members)

About the workshop: Soft circuits are electronic circuits made wearable through the use of conductive thread and conductive fabric. In wearable electronics, circuitry design and application are made with the body in mind.

This workshop will introduce you to the world of wearable conductive materials as well as specific techniques for their application on the body. You will learn to construct soft analog components such as wearable switches, flex and force sensors, soft pressure matrices and even fuzzy, directional 'stroke' sensors. You will also learn to think about the body and its movements in an entirely different way: as a means to actuate electronics!

This workshop is great for crafters, makers, DIYers, electronic hobbyists, and anyone looking to include the dimension of the body and soft analog electronics into their projects.

About the instructors: ERIN LEWIS is an emerging artist who is currently studying Integrated Media at OCAD University, with a minor in Wearable Technology. She works predominately with electronics and video in an installation setting. Erin has released video work with the National Film Board of Canada, exhibited work in Nuit Blanche, and conducted live video performances across Toronto and Europe. She enjoys grapes, kittens, and real-time data feeds.

KEN LEUNG is a multidisciplinary designer and artist residing in Toronto with strong interests in wearable technology, physical computing, and interface design. Ken's interactive work has been exhibited at Nuit Blanche, The Gladstone Hotel, and Harbourfront Center, and he is currently working with the Mobile Experience Lab and Social Body Lab at OCAD on various locative and wearables projects. Ken has a background in Psychology, computer programming, digital media, and Industrial design.

Intro to Lilypad Arduino*
When: Tuesday, June 28th, 7-10pm
Instructors: Ken Leung & Erin Lewis
Price: $45 ($35 InterAccess members)

About the workshop: The Lilypad Arduino is a programmable microcontroller specially designed for use in wearable tech and e-textiles projects.

In this workshop, we will introduce you to the Lilypad and its suite of sensors and accessories, teach you how to interface the Lilypad with soft circuits, and guide you through the basics of writing Arduino code to add fun interactive behaviors to your wearables projects. Hands-on exercises and a variety of example projects will be used to explore the exciting possibilities of this technology.

About the instructors: Please see above.

* Certain materials will be needed for these three wearables workshops, which participants can either bring with them or purchase at InterAccess. Please enquire about the material list and costs when enrolling for any of the workshops in the Wearables Mini Series.
34  Topics / E-Textiles and Craft / Re: SMD leds on cloth strip on: May 04, 2011, 10:06:59 am
Hi Korman!
Using Lilypad LEDs (http://www.sparkfun.com/products/10045) would be a nice idea because they have the resistors attached, however the downside is that you have this purple PCB as well...

Otherwise, you can try attaching something like crimp beads (found in craft, fabric and bead stores: http://www.google.com/search?q=crimp+beads&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi&biw=857&bih=463) and then looping conductive thread through them.  You can compress the crimp bead with pliers to secure the connection. 

Check out this blog for how to get creative with soft circuits:
http://www.sparkfun.com/products/8549

Conductive Thread: http://www.sparkfun.com/products/8549
(4ply is considerably less resistive than 2ply, so I would recommend this)

You can also cut down on your sewing by using a combination of iron-on conductive fabric as well as conductive thread.  For example, you could make the grounds all one long strip of conductive fabric, and only sew the individual data connections to the Arduino.
35  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: Arduino, Prosessing and Theremin on: May 04, 2011, 09:38:42 am
perhaps the wav files you are using are too large to be stored in the buffer when using the "AudioSample" function of the Minim library.  Some of the functions have file size limits, particularly if they are they intended for short snippets of sound.  Check the support for the Minim library here: http://code.compartmental.net/tools/minim/
36  Using Arduino / Installation & Troubleshooting / Re: experiencing first-time issues with the lilypad on: May 02, 2011, 01:50:03 pm
If you are using the FTDI breakout board, you should make sure that none of the solder joints on the board are touching the Lilypad.  Sometimes I use a small piece of felt in between the FTDI breakout board and the Lilypad Arduino just to be certain.  You also need to make sure that you have no power on the Lilypad at the same time as you have it connected to the computer.  If the Lilypad is connected to the computer, it is already getting power from it! 

The best thing to do is unplug any additional components from your Lilypad, and connect just the Lilypad to the computer via USB.  You should be able to get this working.  If not, make sure you are not making any additional contacts with anything conductive.  Make sure the solder joints on the back of the FTDI board are not touching any of the pins.

Hope this helps!
 
37  Topics / E-Textiles and Craft / Re: Call for Participation: 3lectromode - DIY Wearables on: April 01, 2011, 08:29:28 pm
sounds interesting, but not sure where the participation from others comes in?
38  Using Arduino / Interfacing w/ Software on the Computer / Re: Sending Arduino inputs into Pd or Max? on: April 01, 2011, 12:30:37 am
Pduino was useful for me when I was doing something similar, and seemed a lot easier to get working with my Arduino than when I tried using Maxuino.
If you go with Pduino, this document seems helpful: www.schebella.com/arduinopaper.pdf

39  Using Arduino / Interfacing w/ Software on the Computer / Re: Problem with arduino.analogWrite() in Processing on: April 01, 2011, 12:26:22 am
So for whatever reason, calling arduino.analogWrite() in Processing doesn't appear to work.
Instead, I'm calling arduino.digitalWrite(), based on what Tim Igoe says here under "Writing your own pulseOut":
http://www.tigoe.net/pcomp/code/controllers/input-output/analog-output

So, it works!

40  Using Arduino / Interfacing w/ Software on the Computer / Re: Problem with arduino.analogWrite() in Processing on: March 27, 2011, 03:15:50 pm
Ahhhhh! Thanks, Paul!
It didnt occur to me to look there.
smiley-grin
41  Using Arduino / Interfacing w/ Software on the Computer / Problem with arduino.analogWrite() in Processing on: March 26, 2011, 10:14:21 pm
heya'z,

I'm controlling 4 DC motors through Processing, using StandardFirmata on the Arduino.
When I test the motors with a simple sketch in Arduino, they work perfect.  When I try to actuate the motors through Processing, they do nothing.

- I have checked the syntax of the Arduino library in Processing and I believe I have called the functions correctly. 
- I have printed a list of serial ports to confirm that I am listening to the correct port.
- Both StandardFirmata and Processing are set to 9600 baud.
- If I change the analogWrite() to digitalWrite(pin,HIGH), I am able to turn the motors on.

Is there something I am missing when calling arduino.analogWrite() in Processing?

Help, please and thank you!
smiley

Code:

import processing.serial.*;
import cc.arduino.*;
Arduino arduino;

int motor1 = 3;
int motor2 = 5;
int motor3 = 9;
int motor4 = 10;
int pulseWidth = 200;

void setup() {
  size(100,100);
  background(0);
  println(Arduino.list());
  arduino = new Arduino(this, Arduino.list()[0], 9600);
  arduino.pinMode (motor1, Arduino.OUTPUT);
  arduino.pinMode (motor2, Arduino.OUTPUT);
  arduino.pinMode (motor3, Arduino.OUTPUT);
  arduino.pinMode (motor4, Arduino.OUTPUT);
}

void draw() {
    arduino.analogWrite(motor1, pulseWidth);
    arduino.analogWrite(motor2, pulseWidth);
    arduino.analogWrite(motor3, pulseWidth);
    arduino.analogWrite(motor4, pulseWidth);
}
   
42  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Troubleshooting / Re: ClassNotFoundException: processing.serial.Serial on: September 23, 2010, 03:49:43 pm
i just had to import the library, it can still be written as an Arduino serial object, as per my original code.

It was late, i was tired smiley
43  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Troubleshooting / Re: ClassNotFoundException: processing.serial.Serial on: September 23, 2010, 12:00:11 am
pffffff.... I forgot to import the Serial library.  Of course I cannot call to Serial without it!

*dunce*
44  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Troubleshooting / ClassNotFoundException: processing.serial.Serial on: September 22, 2010, 11:46:38 pm
I cant for the life of me figure out what the problem is with my Processing code.  When I compile it, I get this error:
ClassNotFoundException: processing.serial.Serial

and it highlights this area of code:
arduino = new Arduino(this, Arduino.list()[0], 9600);

I've assigned it different comports, I've double checked the baudrate in Standard Firmata against this code, I've declared arduino as an object and imported the library.... what am I overlooking?

here is the Processing code:

Code:
import cc.arduino.*;
import ddf.minim.*;

Arduino arduino;
Minim minim;
AudioPlayer heart;


int ledPin1 = 0;
int ledPin2 = 1;
int ledPin3 = 2;

void setup() {
  size(512,200);
  background(255);
  minim = new Minim(this);    
  arduino = new Arduino(this, Arduino.list()[0], 9600);
  int ledPin1;
  int ledPin2;
  int ledPin3;
}

void draw() {
 background(255);
    playSound();
}

void playSound() {    
  do {
      arduino.digitalWrite(ledPin1, Arduino.LOW); // set first bundle of LEDs off
      arduino.digitalWrite(ledPin2, Arduino.LOW); // set second bundle of LEDs off
      arduino.digitalWrite(ledPin3, Arduino.LOW); // set third bundle of LEDs off

      heart = minim.loadFile("heart.wav");
      heart.play();
      arduino.digitalWrite(ledPin1, Arduino.HIGH); // set first bundle of LEDs HIGH
      wait(30);  
      arduino.digitalWrite(ledPin2, Arduino.HIGH); // set second bundle of LEDs HIGH
      wait(30);
      arduino.digitalWrite(ledPin3, Arduino.HIGH); // set third bundle of LEDs HIGH
      
      do {
        // do nothing until the file ends
      } while (heart.isPlaying());
    } while (true);    
}

void wait(int seconds) {
  do {
    delay(1000);
    seconds--;
  } while (seconds > 0);
}  

void stop() {
  heart.close();
  minim.stop();    
  super.stop();
}
45  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: Lilypad + Lilypad Accelerometer + Processing on: August 31, 2010, 02:07:19 am
I'm using the Lilypad Mega 168 with a Lilypad Accelerometer (ADXL330).

This is the Arduino code that works:
Code:
int sensorPinX = 0;
int sensorPinY = 1;
int sensorPinZ = 2;      
int sensorValueX;
int sensorValueY;
int sensorValueZ;  
        
void setup()  {       
         pinMode(sensorPinX, INPUT);
         pinMode(sensorPinY, INPUT);
         pinMode(sensorPinZ, INPUT);      
         Serial.begin(9600);       
}       
        
void loop() {       
          sensorValueX = analogRead(sensorPinX)*10;       
          sensorValueY = analogRead(sensorPinY)*10;
          sensorValueZ = analogRead(sensorPinZ)*10;
        
          Serial.print(sensorValueX,DEC);
          Serial.print(",");
          Serial.print(sensorValueY, DEC);
          Serial.print(",");
          Serial.println(sensorValueZ, DEC);      
      
          delay(500);       
}       
          

The Processing sketch has worked intermittently, which is to say that today I could read XYZ coords in the serial monitor in Processing, however it was brief, and then went back to zeros.  Might be a hardware problem.
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