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31  Using Arduino / Audio / Re: Experiences with Voice Recognition Module V1/V2/V3 (You can suggest other) on: August 21, 2014, 07:41:52 am
In the EasyVR manual it gives details on how to train commands without a PC.
32  Using Arduino / Displays / Re: 2.4" Colour TFT Touch Screen and Adapter Board for Arduino on: August 21, 2014, 07:26:49 am
@ acboother
Thread was split by mod, so to continue in your thread.
No, I do not have or have used this 2.4" display, have a few 3.2" displays in projects.
Are you using the SD card? If not using the SD card then you could try using those pins D10 -D13
33  Using Arduino / Audio / Re: Experiences with Voice Recognition Module V1/V2/V3 (You can suggest other) on: August 20, 2014, 02:17:15 pm
Got a link to Voice Recognition Module V1/V2/V3?
I use EasyVR V2.0 all the information for it can be downloaded on this page.
I also have a couple of these modules, the EasyVR V2.0 shield is the better module.
34  Using Arduino / Displays / Re: 2.4" Colour TFT Touch Screen and Adapter Board for Arduino on: August 20, 2014, 10:21:53 am
@ acboother
As for reducing the memory usage on the UNO, have you tried using the memorysaver.h file?
It is located in the UTFT library folder.
35  Using Arduino / Displays / Re: 2.4" Colour TFT Touch Screen and Adapter Board for Arduino on: August 19, 2014, 06:44:51 pm
Have some female jumper wires handy?
Connect all the pins from the adapter board to the Uno that are defined in the sketch plus the 5V and ground, see if it works.

36  Using Arduino / Displays / Re: 2.4" Colour TFT Touch Screen and Adapter Board for Arduino on: August 18, 2014, 01:19:34 pm
I have no schematic, I was referring to the sketch here as it only uses 8 pins plus 5v and ground.
And the schematic here , if you could post that here to look at.
Also if you can post the schematic to the LCD screen that will be helpful.
You post all the relevant information and people here will be able to better help.
37  Using Arduino / Displays / Re: 2.4" Colour TFT Touch Screen and Adapter Board for Arduino on: August 18, 2014, 06:21:30 am
It might cover all the pins, but from the sketch posted on hobbycomponents forum it only uses 8 pins plus a 5v and ground pin.
Could you upload the schematic for the adapter board? It's on hobbycomponents forum, I'm not a member there but I see you are and can access that schematic.
38  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: 4x AA Ni-Mh voltage drop on load on: August 15, 2014, 12:33:17 pm
Any good, I don't know never used them.
As for them "working" for the RC car + router, if the car needs 9.6v and the router will run from a 9.6v source, then yes they are the correct "working voltage". But that doesn't mean much.
Without knowing the total current draw of the combined RC car + router and how much run time is needed nobody can answer what total Ah capacity you need for your project.

Please post as much detail about your project as possible.
As it is now every answer to your questions is just raising more questions that could be avoided with more details.
39  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: 4x AA Ni-Mh voltage drop on load on: August 15, 2014, 12:05:53 pm
Like this and this, both from Amazon UK.
40  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: 4x AA Ni-Mh voltage drop on load on: August 14, 2014, 05:59:38 pm
Ok, let's read that data sheet where it says "Recommended discharge current 200 to 6000mA".
That being 200mA steady draw which is 10% of the 2000mA nominal capacity @ 1.3V up to 6000mA pulsed @ 1.17V.
Running the router off the internal regulator from 9.6V or 7.2V will definitely be more efficient then the 2 step process your trying to do as of now.
And it will eliminate the frequency introduced by the booster module into the RC circuitry.
Take what MarkT said about the battery holder and put together a proper pack or purchase one.
It will also prevent the batteries coming out or bad contacts when the RC is bouncing/vibrating.
41  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: 4x AA Ni-Mh voltage drop on load on: August 14, 2014, 03:04:41 pm
With your current setup using 800mA @ 5.12V, 2 hours of run time will be 1600mA or around 80% of your batteries total 2050mA capacity.
For only 1/2 hour of run time this is fine as you are only discharging the batteries about 20%.
But, you are pulling 40% of the batteries total 2000mA capacity to achieve this voltage boost, which is not the best for the batteries as that current has to go through the batteries internal resistance. More current = larger voltage drop = wasted power(heat) = faster wear down of the batteries.
Most 9.6v RC battery packs like the ones sold at Walmart are nothing more then 8 X AA's in series.
So a DIY 9.6V battery pack consisting of 8 x the batteries you are already using will give you around 2Ah @ 9.6V which is 19.2W total power and about 9.6W of useable power.
Your 12V 240mA load draws 2.88W of power plus the power of the boost module, whatever it is at a 9.6V source voltage.
You will be able to get around 2+ hours of run time at about a 40% discharge, but for how many recharge cycles?
More then your current setup, but also much less then the batteries rated amount of recharge cycles.
If you double the Ah capacity to 4Ah @ 9.6V and properly care for the batteries you could safely run the router for 2+ hours daily. This way you can get much closer to the batteries rated amount of recharge cycles as you would be around a 20% discharge for each 2+ hour cycle.



42  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: 4x AA Ni-Mh voltage drop on load on: August 14, 2014, 01:18:20 pm
It's not good to drain the rechargeable batteries until the router shuts off, that will be well below the recommended discharge.
The boost module will keep boosting until there is not enough current or voltage to do so, regardless of the battery pack's state of charge.
Go with your assumption that the router will run for 2 hours and see how many cycles you get before the time your load runs becomes dramatically lower or your batteries won't charge properly.
Be aware that as the voltage of the batteries drops the modules efficiency gets worse.
For better efficiency raise the voltage of your battery pack.
2 x 9.6v battery packs in parallel a 4aH total capacity will give you around 2aH of useable current or 19.2W.
That you could safely say will run your router for 2+ hours.

As for adding another router, it might "work" for you, but with your current setup it surely will not be "properly working".
43  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: 4x AA Ni-Mh voltage drop on load on: August 14, 2014, 11:36:11 am
Better?
Batteries: 800mA @ 5.12V = 4.096W
Load: 240mA @ 12V = 2.88W
Module consumes 1.216W
Not very efficient.
Total power of the "batteries in perfect world" @ 5.12V = 10.24W
Shouldn't drain your batteries more then 50% or 5.12W of power to safely use.
44  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: 4x AA Ni-Mh voltage drop on load on: August 14, 2014, 10:05:48 am
You need higher capacity at 4.8V, those modules will boost 4.8V to 12V, of course the efficiency is very poor.
You will need to provide 600mA @4.8V plus whatever the mA the module consumes for reliably running 240mA @ 12V.
That's over 25% of your total capacity.
To avoid large voltage drops on your supply keep the load to 10% of your batteries capacity.
So to reliably run 240mA @ 12V  from 4.8V you should have a battery pack with an 6aH capacity.
With a booster module it is most efficient to keep the supply voltage as close to the load voltage as possible.
At 9.6V you would need 300mA plus the mA the module consumes, so a 9.6V battery pack with 3aH capacity would also work.
But what about this question, how long do you want run the load for?
45  Community / Exhibition / Gallery / Re: Lucid dreaming glasses - first project on: August 11, 2014, 09:22:08 pm
Cool project, try it with a diffuser lens over each led, gives a warmer relaxed feeling.
Also these LEDs will allow you to use less wires to control them, no current limiting resistors needed and an SMD size.
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