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16  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Bigger power supply on: May 24, 2013, 11:07:55 pm
 smiley-roll-sweat ... different opinions... which one is more likely?
17  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Bigger power supply on: May 24, 2013, 10:56:20 pm
Hi,

Finally, I moved on to a power supply with bigger capacity, i.e. 12V 30A .  I'm just wondering.  How far the damage would be if I accidentally shock myself with the 12V 30A output?  ( Sorry for asking newbie questions )

Thanks.
Gary
18  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: m6 bolts and nuts on: May 06, 2013, 06:46:31 pm
That's unusual - I'd never have thought of that!

ya, i felt the same when I heard that from the manufacturer.  Just in case you might be curious, the bolts I'm talking about is make of PEEK with some custom designs. That's should justify the manufacturer's mistakes a tiny bit because of human interventions.
19  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: m6 bolts and nuts on: May 06, 2013, 07:08:43 am
It turns out that my m6 bolts are bigger than they should be because of some manufacturing issues (confirmed by the manufacturer).  Thanks.
20  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / m6 bolts and nuts on: May 03, 2013, 12:25:50 pm
Hi All,

I'm trying to replace a m6 bolt.  My new m6 bolt just cannot fit into the old nut, I measured the pitches of the bolts with a caliper, and the pitches are exactly the same.

Originally, I thought all any m6 bolt can fit into a m6 nut.  However (and obviously), I'm wrong. I came across an article mentioning that blots have different thread forms ( http://www.roton.com/identify_threads.aspx ).  When I looked closely to the threads of my bolts, I found that the thread forms are really different.

I'm just wondering who (or which countries) uses which thread form.  Any information is greatly appreciated.

Yours sincerely,
Gary
21  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Connecting input pin to output pin on: April 01, 2013, 10:13:38 pm
Ah, its between two different parts. Should have mentioned that initially.
So Rx to Tx, Tx to Rx, that is connecting input to output.

The program of the first Arduino is not written by me, and the serial port of the first Arduino already had its role which I don't want to touch.  The part that I'm working on is the buttons on it (nine of them as a whole).  Basically, I'm doing all these for fun and for learning what can and can't be done.  Just in case you might be curious, I have a 3D printer driven by an Arduino board which has a LCD panel on it, I captured the LCD output with another Arduino board, replaced the buttons with my output pins, and resembled everything remotely on an Android phone via Bluetooth serial.  All that had been done, and works nicely.  I'm now double checking for any potential flaws.  (for fun, cheers  smiley-razz)
22  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Connecting input pin to output pin on: April 01, 2013, 03:47:20 pm
There is no need to do this anyway you can always read in software the state of an output pin. Besides this your code set the output state so you can always keep track of that with a variable.

I'm trying to make a communication between two Arduino boards.  That's why I connect input pins to output pins.  Though it is not a watertight option, it is handy without the current limiting resistors.  I definitely will put some resistors in between to safeguard current when everything finalized.
23  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Connecting input pin to output pin on: March 31, 2013, 11:01:12 pm
Thanks a lot for the information.  I got it.  smiley
24  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Connecting input pin to output pin on: March 30, 2013, 07:08:40 am
Hi All,

In the documentation, it said that when a pin is configured to be an input pin, the pin will have high impedance as if it is connected in series to a mega ohm resistor. Can I connect an input pin to an output pin on an Arduino UNO without a current limiting resistor?
25  Using Arduino / Displays / Re: About LCD 1604 on: March 25, 2013, 05:24:59 am
I have successfully resembled the LCD output locally in my Arduino, and mirrored the LCD output via serial.  Everything works fine, great ^^.

Now, I want to program my Arduino to control the buttons on the LCD panel.  Here is the circuit board of the LCD panel,


Originally, I thought it should be an easy task.  However, when I looked into the circuit of the LCD panel buttons, I saw something funny.  The signal corresponds to the off state of the buttons is HIGH.  Anyway, I tried to replace the switches with my Arduino output pins, and here is what I have done
.

Though it works, I have a very bad feeling about my rough design.  First, I'm shorting an input pin of the first Arduino to an output pin on my Arduino. Am I going to damage anything like this?  Second, the off state of the buttons is HIGH.  Before my Arduino can set its output pin HIGH during setup(), my Arduino is probably pressing buttons randomly.

Are these two issues going to be a problem?  If so, how can they be solved?

Gary
26  Using Arduino / Displays / Re: About LCD 1604 on: March 20, 2013, 04:17:53 pm
Opps... how can I miss something that obvious?  Thanks smiley.
27  Using Arduino / Displays / Re: About LCD 1604 on: March 20, 2013, 03:43:54 pm
...
I'm assuming the comment about installing a custom built Android OS is sarcasm?
as even modifying the code in the first Arduino wouldn't require that.
...
Thanks for pointing it out, and my sincere apology to Retroplayer.  Being sarcastic is a terrible habit that I  picked up from the programming forums, which I'm trying real hard to get rid of.

...
Consider processing the hd44780 information and mirroring the LCD display
inside of the interface board rather than pushing the low level information over a serial interface
to the Android APP.
...

Finally, I successfully resembled the text from the output to the LCD display  ( I wired something wrong, and had been stuck there for quite a while, anyway... ).  I can now isolate the register and the data commands, and their corresponding code.  I'm trying to program my Arduino to process the LCD output for mirroring the LCD display.  Unfortunately, I couldn't find the documentation of the register commands.  Though it is possible for me to obtain the information in a less civilized way (reading the LCD library source code), it is always easier to do it with the documentation.

Do you know where can I find the documentation of the register commands?

Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Gary
28  Using Arduino / Storage / Re: SD card reading problem on: March 16, 2013, 10:11:58 pm
...
More information would be useful.  If SD Formatter fails, download SdFat http://code.google.com/p/sdfatlib/downloads/list and run the SdInfo example and post the results.

I formatted the possibly damaged SD card with SD Formatter and tried again.  The Arduino device (Arduino Mega with some shields) still couldn't read it.  I followed your instructions to prepare the SD cards info with an Arduino UNO board (for both the working SD card and the not working SD card).  Unfortunately, I have no idea how to analysis the info.

Can you help me out?

Here is the info of the possibly damaged SD card,

Card type: SD1

Manufacturer ID: 0X2
OEM ID: TM
Product: SD02G
Version: 2.8
Serial number: 449635488
Manufacturing date: 3/2007

cardSize: 2059.40 MB (MB = 1,000,000 bytes)
flashEraseSize: 128 blocks
eraseSingleBlock: true

SD Partition Table
part,boot,type,start,length
1,0X0,0X6,243,4019175
2,0X0,0X0,0,0
3,0X0,0X0,0,0
4,0X0,0X0,0,0

Volume is FAT16
blocksPerCluster: 64
clusterCount: 62791
freeClusters: 62791
freeSpace: 2057.54 MB (MB = 1,000,000 bytes)
fatStartBlock: 244
fatCount: 2
blocksPerFat: 246
rootDirStart: 736
dataStartBlock: 768


Here is the info of the SD card that can work with the Arduino device,

Card type: SD1

Manufacturer ID: 0X15
OEM ID: MC
Product: SMI  
Version: 0.0
Serial number: 3720085777
Manufacturing date: 12/2003

cardSize: 513.28 MB (MB = 1,000,000 bytes)
flashEraseSize: 128 blocks
eraseSingleBlock: false

SD Partition Table
part,boot,type,start,length
1,0X0,0X6,233,1002030
2,0X0,0X0,0,0
3,0X0,0X0,0,0
4,0X0,0X0,0,0

Volume is FAT16
blocksPerCluster: 32
clusterCount: 31304
freeClusters: 31304
freeSpace: 512.88 MB (MB = 1,000,000 bytes)
fatStartBlock: 234
fatCount: 2
blocksPerFat: 123
rootDirStart: 480
dataStartBlock: 512




29  Using Arduino / Storage / Re: SD card reading problem on: March 14, 2013, 09:40:36 am
Does someone need to tell you to reformat it?
smiley-razz

Try fat16 and fat32.

I did format my SD card (both fat16 and fat32 x quick format and low level format) before asking.
30  Using Arduino / Storage / SD card reading problem on: March 14, 2013, 02:59:44 am
Hi All,

I have a SD card inserted to a Arduino SD card module.  The SD card worked fine for a year.
However, the card suddenly failed to work today.  I ruled out any hardware problems
by testing it with another SD card, so I probably have a damaged SD card.

Here is the mysterious part. The probably damaged SD card can actually be read/write/format on a PC, but not on the Arduino.

How's that possible?

Yours faithfully,
Gary
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