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46  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Very Simple Arduino Breadboard on: August 25, 2014, 11:20:41 am
And the survey says . . .
What is your question?
47  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Double throw switch for debouncing on: August 25, 2014, 01:56:26 am
Quote
Am I right in assuming that this circuit is only guaranteed to be bounce free if TR1 and TR2 are never simultaneously connected? 
Yes in normal double throw devices this NEVER happens.
This happens only in very special switches that are make before break . . .

Bouncing is NOT a contact going from one position to the other position issue.
Bouncing is a make and open circuit issue.

48  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Double throw switch for debouncing on: August 25, 2014, 01:39:35 am
Quote
Why didn't I think of it that way?  Correct me if I'm wrong but haven't I basically described doing an SR latch in software?  If not is a software SR latch possible?  What would it look like?
I am mostly hardware.
I would definitely do it in hardware if it was me.
Even though I use software now and then, I believe software de-bouncing is NOT time well spent in code.

If you don't want to use an I.C. use two transistors.
49  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Double throw switch for debouncing on: August 25, 2014, 12:57:58 am
Don't know if this helps but feed the double throw switch to a simple cross coupled latch then to the Arduino input.
100% no bounces.
No software involved!

50  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Multiple PCBs, through hole component installation on: August 25, 2014, 12:30:16 am
After soldering 100s of PCBs and useing only regular 1/2" foam never had any problems with melting.
Never tried it but may be a soft natural brush might work also.

I use a Shurline brush when making PCBs to speed up the etching process.
It has brush filaments on a bed of foam maybe try it.
Buy them at HomeDepot.

Edit:
Had my wife sew 1 - 1/2 cups of tapioca in a cotton bag. 
Use it as a self forming weight when adding components to material.
51  Using Arduino / General Electronics / USB power jack needed on: August 25, 2014, 12:04:50 am
My brain is stuck.
Trying to get away from the jack on the left, what to go to the jack on the right, however, i am looking for a smaller form factor, USB chassis mount version.

Any suggestions?

52  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Measuring Nano capacitors on: August 24, 2014, 11:40:28 pm
Great reading here:
http://www.gammon.com.au/forum/?id=12075
53  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Multiple PCBs, through hole component installation on: August 24, 2014, 11:25:41 pm
You've got me in a grip.  smiley-slim
Let us know how you like it.

I have used the  Weller unit for years, have to replace the foam now though.
Grip looks like it has a nice third hand capability.

EDIT:

You should add a foam hand to your grip.
54  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Multiple PCBs, through hole component installation on: August 24, 2014, 10:41:08 pm
If you are doing only one PCB then a device like this is useful (made by Weller).

In #2 you capture your through hole components with the movable arm (has foam pad on it).
In #3 you rotate the (k)nob (  smiley-eek ) to expose the bottom side for soldering.

See link HERE for PCB HOLDER, JIG, ESD, WELLER ESF120
55  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: Looking for Ideas for multiple conditions / Best way to proceed. on: August 24, 2014, 08:27:09 pm
As far as the electronics are concerned, I would definitely add a backup system/alarm that is not connected in any way to that of the Arduino. Including the power supply!
56  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: ABC - Arduino Basic Connections on: August 24, 2014, 06:56:04 pm
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I asked for the PDF, so guess I should type it up!
I think the plans of the OP is to have this in some form, maybe as a book offering.
57  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Multiple PCBs, through hole component installation on: August 24, 2014, 06:28:51 pm
Soldering up a PCB using through hole components can be sped up by using the following process.
#1     You want to solder up several  PCBs.
#2    Out of old PCB material, cut a piece the same side as the board you want to assemble in #1.
#3    - Cut a piece of 1/2" foam the same size as in #2.  
         - Use double sided tape to stick the foam onto the board in #2
#4    Get some 1/2" aluminum channel from Home Depot and cut off 2 to 4 one inch pieces.  
#5    Take a second work board (as in #1), add 4 standoffs to the mounting holes. Add set screws to the tops of the stand offs.
#6    Insert your work PCB onto the set screws in #5.
#7    - Insert all your lowest through hole components (resistors diodes etc.) onto the work PCB in #6
         - Put the foam card in #3 on top of the work PCB.  
         - Compress the foam down and add the aluminum channel pieces.
#8    Solder the components and cut off all leads.
#9    As before but this time add all your I.C.s
#10   Solder all your I.C. pins.
. . .
Repeat as needed.

58  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Crossover component on: August 24, 2014, 04:04:21 pm
There are times when making single sided boards that you may want to avoid multiple jumpers since some I.C.s. don't go just Pin 1 to Pin 1 etc.  

This is not the best example, however, consider the simple crossover component on my finger tip (with no finger print).
If I.C. X pin 1 goes to I.C. Y pin 2 and I.C. X pin 2 goes to I.C. Y pin 1, the crossover could be placed in-between the two I.C.s to accomplish this.

I would solder the crossover component on the foil side, just like a SMD resistor would be soldered.

Therefore the crossover component on the foil side contains the jumper(s) within itself.

59  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Small wire segments on: August 24, 2014, 02:02:48 am
I modified an old pair of flush cutters to do the above.
I used a 3 cornered file and made two small groves in the blades.
I kept on filling and testing till it worked on both 24 and 22 AWG stranded wire.
Also works on insulated solid wire.

You could use a small diamond drill set.
Just turn the bit with your fingers.
60  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Small wire segments on: August 24, 2014, 01:10:39 am
You can do the same thing with wire cutters (dull works best).
Be careful not to cut any of the strands in steps  #1 and #3.

Practice makes perfect.
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