Show Posts
Pages: [1] 2
1  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Rotating an iPad long-distance on: November 19, 2012, 12:56:15 pm
I love SparkFun!!  Got this response to my question this morning:

"TX is still D1 and RX is still D0, but they are arranged on the board funny.  Make sure you are using Serial1.read and Serial1.print (Serial.read and Serial.print are for the USB port)."

Changed all the 'Serial's to 'Serial1's, and now it works!  Hallelujah! 

I was so surprised when the Javascript slider actually made the thing turn, I jumped.  smiley
2  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Rotating an iPad long-distance on: November 18, 2012, 04:41:33 pm
I don't know anything about the Pro Micro - is it possible it has a different clock and this is affecting the serial baud rate settings?

If you're concerned about the quality of your solder joints, have you done a continuity check between the components on either side of the joint?

No, I know I need to, but I don't have the tool that lets you do this.  This is a very amateur operation I'm running, here.  smiley
3  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Rotating an iPad long-distance on: November 18, 2012, 02:47:48 am
Yeah, I thought so, too, but my other Arduino boards (Uno and Duemilanove) are able to read the data from the Redpark serial cable just fine, with the same sketch and same iOS app.  When I move the same exact setup to the Pro Micro, the serial connection breaks. 
4  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Rotating an iPad long-distance on: November 18, 2012, 02:03:36 am
It's all physically wired, no BT or RF.  The Arduino gets the servo angle from an app running on the iPad, which sends it through the Redpark serial cable to RX/TX. 

I'm ordering a Pro Mini, instead of a Pro Micro, to see if it's just the way the Micro handles the serial connection.  If that's not it, I'm stumped.  It's still possible I burned out the pins on the Pro Micro with my lousy soldering. 
5  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Rotating an iPad long-distance on: November 18, 2012, 01:24:13 am
Thanks! 

Thinking out loud... if the problem was the TX/RX pins being reversed, wouldn't reversing the connections fix it?  I've swapped the wires, and the serial connection still isn't recognized.

The Pro Micro uses a different processor than most of the other Arduino boards, one that handles the USB directly instead of through something else.  I wonder if that's getting in the way of my Redpark serial somehow. 
6  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Rotating an iPad long-distance on: November 18, 2012, 12:33:08 am
 smiley-kiss

I did kind of wonder why on earth they'd draw a trace like that...  smiley  

So maybe it's not because of the bad solder job?  I noticed that TX and RX are reversed on pins 0 and 1 from what they are on the bigger Arduino boards.

Is there code in a library somewhere that assigns RX to pin 0 and TX to pin 1? 
7  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Rotating an iPad long-distance on: November 18, 2012, 12:16:58 am
I ended up figuring out the power supply question (I think)...  I'm using a stripped-down USB cable carrying a 10W current from an Apple iPad charger, and connecting it to both the Arduino and the mini-USB to charge the iPad.  Seems to be working fine...  only problem now is that the Arudino Pro Micro from SparkFun isn't reading the serial data from the Redpark cable.  The Redpark still communicates fine with my other boards (Uno and an old Duecimilasomethingsomething), but the Pro Micro just doesn't seem to recognize it.  

I had a little trouble with one of the TX/RX pins when I was soldering, and burned part of the trace that runs next to the pins on the Pro Micro.  Could that be causing the problem?  Photo attached.  [edit:  Uh, actually, is that just paint?]

Or is is that the Pro Micro handles serial connections differently, and won't work with the Redpark cable?  Do I need to modify the serial library or something?  

8  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Rotating an iPad long-distance on: November 18, 2012, 12:11:01 am
Here's what it looks like:



9  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Rotating an iPad long-distance on: November 08, 2012, 01:39:31 am
My husband and I are adapting this project to work with an iPad running FaceTime:  http://blog.vmfarms.com/2011/10/how-we-solved-remote-employee-problem.html

We've got a socket open between the Arduino and a web server via a background app on the iPad, using the Redpark TTL cable (woo!), so we can send it the angle commands without needing a network connection on the Arduino.  

The last problem I need to figure out is how to elegantly provide power to both the iPad for charging, and to the Arduino/servo for rotating.  I'm already using the DockStubz pass-through between the Redpark and the iPad, but that leaves me with two separate cords coming out of the base of this thing.  I'd like it to be a single cord to plug in, that can deliver around 6v to the Arduino (with servo), and simultaneously 5v to the iPad.  iPad doesn't need to fast charge, trickle is fine.  

I have kind of a fuzzy idea of taking a 12v wall wart and using voltage regulators to simultaneously split it up into the two desired outputs, but this is all new territory for me.  I was also toying with the idea of opening up the actual iPad charger, and trying to somehow bring an additional 6v line out of that.

Suggestions much appreciated!  I'll post pics of this thing as soon as it's assembled; just needs one more coat of polyurethane (and some crossed fingers).  smiley

Thanks all,

Aja

10  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Birthday Simon Puzzle Box on: December 07, 2009, 02:16:31 pm
Inspired by the "reverse geocache" box, I'm working on building an Arduino puzzle box using a SIMON game (you know, the one where you have to repeat the sequence the computer gives you.)  

I found Dave Auld's great example online, and I'm trying to recreate it.  I've got most of it figured out, but I'm having some trouble with the circuit schematic, especially since I'm not using a breadboard.  




I understand all the LCD wiring, but I'm not sure what's happening between the +5V, GND, and the pushbuttons/LEDs.  Would each LED/pushbutton have a ground wire going back to the GND pin?  And does one of the speaker terminals have both +5V and GND connected to it?
11  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: Computer power supply and cordless drill motor on: October 15, 2009, 11:33:22 pm
Hmm, would it be better to use the 5v wires from the power supply?  I'll look into the higher-watt rheostats, thanks!
12  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Computer power supply and cordless drill motor on: October 15, 2009, 07:31:32 pm
So continuing on my automated beer bottling assembly line, I'm working on a motorized scissor lift to raise and lower the bottles to the fill tubes (they need to reach to the bottom of the bottles).  I've got a motor from an old 9.6v cordless drill, and a computer power supply.  But of course, when I hook the motor directly to the 12v wires on the power supply, it runs for a half second and then immediately shuts off.  I assume it's drawing way too much current, and the power supply shuts down as a safety feature?  

If I wire a potentiometer in between, do you think that will keep the power supply from shutting off?  If so, how can I tell if a particular potentiometer (like, at Radio Shack) can handle the load?

13  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: Open/close ball valve with Arduino on: October 14, 2009, 10:02:14 pm
I totally agree, I'm going to go with this solenoid that retrolefty suggested:  http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=290351616928#ht_2016wt_779

The pump and some hose barb adapters will arrive next week, and then I'll find out if the timing plan will work, or if I'll need to set up some weight sensors or something to automate the shutoff.  Either way, this is going to be a much better system than the way I bottle beer now.  smiley
14  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: Open/close ball valve with Arduino on: October 14, 2009, 07:21:11 pm
Okay, after an hour in the Home Depot plumbing aisle, I tested the manifold system today:

[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zl5gW2sZ_bw[/media]

It's not 100% perfect, but I wasn't expecting it to be at this point.  The important part is that the water is making it all the way to the end...  it'll just be a matter of fine-tuning the valves once the pump arrives next week.  For today I used a 10 foot gravity feed, which should be about 4 PSI, less than the pump I ordered.  It's a diaphragm pump, very gentle on the liquid, and safe for drinking water.  I know people use it for transferring wine to barrels.  

I think this is going to work!  Fun stuff.  smiley
15  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: Open/close ball valve with Arduino on: October 13, 2009, 12:13:18 am
Damn, just read the part about the timing changing.  Does that happen with pumps, too?  

Measuring the weight is an interesting idea...  especially if I can get all 6 to fill evenly.  I'd only have to measure the weight of one.  
Pages: [1] 2