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1  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: wich one? on: July 21, 2014, 10:37:19 am

Buying one with  the larger rectangular DIP-IC is probably better as one with small square SMD IC.
When you should accidentally fry your arduino, you can replace  a DIP-IC easily.
Replacing  a SMD-chip is possible as well, but requires solder skills, the chance of ruining copper traces is also quite high.
2  Community / Bar Sport / Re: The Cracked Pot on: July 10, 2014, 04:07:58 am
Reminds me of the 'glass half full/empty' definition:

Optimist, the glass is half full
Pessimist, the glass is half empty


Heard from a neighbour who hasn't been lucky lately...
 did you know a pessimist is an optimist with experience ?  smiley-grin
3  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Hhelp for miniature house automation!! on: July 03, 2014, 05:53:57 am
Starterkits can be nice, but usually they're quite expensive, include parts that you may not need and miss parts you do need. IMO they're nice to introduce people with electronics, but often lack components if you already have a project in mind.

The sunfounder-kit for example doesn't seem to include the arduino itself. With only 2 white and a lot of red leds it may also be difficult build a doll house without turning it into a brothel...

I'd think about how... you want to automate the house first, make a list parts that could be automated, what you would need for that and finally buy the stuff you need.


Some ideas to integrate :
Automated blinds,
burglar alarm with detection + random lights
Doorbell
Automated streetlights

You could of course make this list longer, an 1.8" screen + mp3-player could resemble TV and sound system. With an ethernet shield you could control your house remotely. You could make it as easy/difficult as you want although a lot of things may be overkill and take a lot of time to integrate. Who would need a thermostat, heating system and fire detection in a doll house for example ?

If it does need to resemble a real house btw, it may also be nice to include a bluetooth module, in order to demonstrate its functions, using a phone, as realistic as possible.
4  Community / Bar Sport / Re: Is it just me, or.... on: July 02, 2014, 05:08:00 pm
..... are there a lot of Voice Recognition questions today. All in the same class at the same school?
Sorry. What did you say?  smiley-mr-green

WILL       IT      HELP      IF        I        SPEAK       SLOWLY     AND     E        NUN      CI     ATE        MY      WORDS?
WHAT?? THE NUNS ATE YOUR WORMS!?!?

IF THE BUNS... ATE THEIR WORK... AGAIN, THAT WOULD EXPLAIN WHY WE'VE SEEN SO MANY VR-QUESTIONS LATELY smiley-wink
5  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Built own computer on: June 22, 2014, 04:47:18 am
I guess arduino won't be the best platform to use yet.

It's possible to connect keyboard, display and storage, but it will be very hard to squeeze any OS in the small amount of memory most arduinos  have.

If you really want to use an arduino, an Arduino YUN probably is the best choice. You could also wait for the Arduino Tre, but it isn't on the market yet. Since both are quite new it may be hard to find the support you need.

Looking at your requirements  a Raspberry Pi may be nice as well.
6  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: One servo works. other 3 dont.. (but they do with servo tester). on: June 15, 2014, 06:30:01 am
I've used pins 7,8,9 and 10 in the example below, it should do the same as your example, but for all 4 servos.

Code:
#include <Servo.h>
 
Servo myservo1;  // create servo object to control a servo
                // a maximum of eight servo objects can be created
Servo myservo2;
Servo myservo3;
Servo myservo4;
 
int pos = 0;    // variable to store the servo position
 
void setup()
{
  myservo1.attach(7);  // attaches the servo on pin 7 to the servo object
  myservo2.attach(8);  // attaches the servo on pin 8 to the servo object
  myservo3.attach(9);  // attaches the servo on pin 9 to the servo object
  myservo4.attach(10);  // attaches the servo on pin 10 to the servo object
}
 
 
void loop()
{
  // move servo 1 on pin 7
  for(pos = 0; pos < 180; pos += 1)  // goes from 0 degrees to 180 degrees
  {                                  // in steps of 1 degree
    myservo1.write(pos);              // tell servo to go to position in variable 'pos'
    delay(15);                       // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position
  }
  for(pos = 180; pos>=1; pos-=1)     // goes from 180 degrees to 0 degrees
  {                               
    myservo1.write(pos);              // tell servo to go to position in variable 'pos'
    delay(15);                       // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position
  }
  // servo 2
  for(pos = 0; pos < 180; pos += 1)  // goes from 0 degrees to 180 degrees
  {                                  // in steps of 1 degree
    myservo2.write(pos);              // tell servo to go to position in variable 'pos'
    delay(15);                       // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position
  }
  for(pos = 180; pos>=1; pos-=1)     // goes from 180 degrees to 0 degrees
  {                               
    myservo2.write(pos);              // tell servo to go to position in variable 'pos'
    delay(15);                       // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position
  }
  // servo 3
  for(pos = 0; pos < 180; pos += 1)  // goes from 0 degrees to 180 degrees
  {                                  // in steps of 1 degree
    myservo3.write(pos);              // tell servo to go to position in variable 'pos'
    delay(15);                       // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position
  }
  for(pos = 180; pos>=1; pos-=1)     // goes from 180 degrees to 0 degrees
  {                               
    myservo3.write(pos);              // tell servo to go to position in variable 'pos'
    delay(15);                       // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position
  }
  // servo 4
  for(pos = 0; pos < 180; pos += 1)  // goes from 0 degrees to 180 degrees
  {                                  // in steps of 1 degree
    myservo4.write(pos);              // tell servo to go to position in variable 'pos'
    delay(15);                       // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position
  }
  for(pos = 180; pos>=1; pos-=1)     // goes from 180 degrees to 0 degrees
  {                               
    myservo4.write(pos);              // tell servo to go to position in variable 'pos'
    delay(15);                       // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position
  }
}
7  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Eagle Cad Design. on: June 05, 2014, 05:24:26 am
Personally I rather route manually, eagles autorouter quite often turns my schematics in to spaghetti. It can create loads of unneeded vias and sometimes it won't even finish autorouting, while I can if I do it myself.

Must say I haven't used freerouting yet.

It may indeed look like a mess when you've just added components and... look at the PCB-screen.
To me it's like freestyle jigsaw puzzling,  If you rotate  that  IC 90 degrees CW for example, it already becomes
a lot easier to route.
8  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: Night street lights on: May 29, 2014, 06:07:37 am

There are a lot of programming errors in your sketch and you should check what's possible technically with an arduino. For a human it's easy to recognize you want to turn a light off in the next line as example.

Code:
analogWrite(led11,brightness = 0);

A microcontroller does need exact/correct commands though, otherwise it will result in an error.
It will expect something like this

Code:
brightness = 0;
analogWrite(led11,brightness);

One would expect the next lines to work and dim led14 for 50% after that last remark, but they won't.

Code:
brightness = 127;
analogWrite(led14,brightness);

An Arduino mega only has 15 pins (2 to 13 and 44 to 46) capable of supporting the analogWrite() function. It won't dim other pins using that function.

This doesn't mean it's impossible to fade 50+ leds though, you could even fade several 100 leds  in millions of colours using an arduino, but you'll need to know how you can do that.

Best is probably to learn about & experiment with the programming language and possibilities of an arduino first.

You can by following the tutorial/examples.

You didn't tell how you want to connect your leds by the way, keep in mind your arduino is the "brain" and can handle some power, but requires extra components if you want to handle a lot of power.

Even when all Leds are just using 20 milli Ampere/piece for example, it will use 1 Ampere when all 50 are on at the same time if you connect them directly, which will certainly blow up your arduino.

9  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: DS18B20 temperature sensor and power consumption on: May 28, 2014, 05:02:38 am
Hi,

It's hard to explain the drop in consumption, without sketch/schematic.

Looking at your temperature-sensor module, I do notice a led that you don't really need.

Nick Gammon has a nice tutorial on how to save energy on the controller side b.t.w.
http://gammon.com.au/power
10  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Use digital pin,both as input and outpout,without always reconfiging the pinMode on: May 17, 2014, 05:11:29 pm
If you have 2 extra pins left I would use those as well.

Using OR-gates would be possible as well. OR-gates are available with 2 or more inputs and when one or more inputs is/are HIGH, so is the output. Most OR-chips house several  OR gates.

In the lists below, you can find several types..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_7400_series_integrated_circuits
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_4000_series_integrated_circuits
11  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Arduino Uno & uBlox max-7 using hardware serial on: May 16, 2014, 03:00:19 pm

but simply changing that to:

Code:
SoftwareSerial ss(0, 1);

Does not work?

Must say  I haven't tried it, perhaps it works when you don't use any standard (hardware) serial commands.

But, why would you use pins 0 and 1 for softwareserial-purposes ?
Both are part of your hardware serial port and can be used with standard serial commands.
12  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Infrared LED communication question on: May 15, 2014, 04:17:06 am
You'll  be able to extend the range a lot with one of these, but 1 km is probably too much.

http://www.ebay.nl/itm/10W-20W-850nm-940nm-Infrared-IR-10Watt-20Watt-High-Power-LED-Light-Bulb-Lamp-DIY-/151299931501?pt=AU_Lighting_Fans&var=&hash=item233a2dbd6d
13  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Distance Sensing up to 180 feet (50 meters) on: May 14, 2014, 02:53:46 pm
Quote
but maybe this article on Parabolic Microphones could minimize hearing loss
Only $700.
Bargain

Ouch, wrong one, even in a 4 for 1 sale, (why the ...k do I always forget to type DIY in my searches  ?)  smiley-wink

Anyway,  this one may be affordable,  this one certainly is.

Keep in mind that the speed of sound is affected most by temperature then less by humidity and pressure.

Now that you mention it, travelling in air, windspeed should... be... compensated as well.


It's indeed a lot of arduino-ing the arduino, measuring  a piece of rope,  will probably be simpler to get a 1 inch resolution.  (measuring/ rolling it electronically would at least be easy using an arduino).
14  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Distance Sensing up to 180 feet (50 meters) on: May 14, 2014, 07:49:37 am
A Laser would work as well, but aiming may be a problem. Radio is indeed better/easier.
You would need to aim it, but maybe this article on Parabolic Microphones could minimize hearing loss smiley-wink.


15  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Distance Sensing up to 180 feet (50 meters) on: May 14, 2014, 03:29:39 am
I'm not sure whether it will work/what equipment you would need.
I wonder whether it's possible to use  a combination of light and sound triggered at the same time.

A light beam will be detected almost instantly, sound travels much slower.
If the sound signal is detected 160 millisecond after detecting the light, distance should be ~180 feet.
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