Show Posts
Pages: [1]
1  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: [SOLVED] Reading Serial from a Breadboard 'Arduino' with an Uno on: August 01, 2013, 10:44:39 am
I don't know if anyone will see this, since I marked it as solved, but will connecting to the serial in and out ports also allow me to flash the Atmega with scripts from the PC based IDE?  I didn't realize this was possible and have been pulling the chip from my breadboard and putting the chip into my Uno to program it (quite annoying considering all the revisions I've been doing).  smiley-razz

It's amazing the things you can learn when you ask a simple question...
2  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: [SOLVED] Reading Serial from a Breadboard 'Arduino' with an Uno on: July 30, 2013, 03:55:35 pm
Thanks!  You guys just saved me a headache.
3  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: Reading Serial from a Breadboard 'Arduino' with an Uno on: July 30, 2013, 03:38:01 pm
Thanks Lefty,

Complete dummy questions: which are the serial input and output pins? 
Less of a dummy question (I hope): If I removed the atmega chip completely would this still work or does the signal go through the microcontroller?

Thanks again!
4  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / [SOLVED] Reading Serial from a Breadboard 'Arduino' with an Uno on: July 30, 2013, 03:16:46 pm
Good afternoon,

Sorry if this is a re-post, I couldn't find a relevant post.  I currently have an arduino running on a breadboard, and am satisfied with the code but would like to be able to see the serial output.  I know I can get a breakout board to allow me to read and program the board with usb.  My question is: is there any way to read the serial output of my project using an Uno which is connected to a PC?

I don't want to hook the Uno up into my circuit but want to be able to monitor the serial output.  Is there anyway to have the Uno read a pin on the breadboard?

Sorry if this is confusing, and thanks in advance for the help.
Hainsy
5  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Very basic resistor/piezo question on: January 25, 2013, 09:58:34 am
Both really helpful answers.  Although, now I have more questions:

With the diode, the purpose it to prevent a negative current correct?  How will this act to protect the pin in the case of a strong knock?  Presumably if I am concerned about overloading the pin I would use a smaller resistor in the voltage divider (as you mentioned, with a 1 M resitor I'm effectively keeping the voltage the same)?

Sorry for the incessant questioning...
6  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Very basic resistor/piezo question on: January 24, 2013, 02:38:38 pm
Thanks very much, that's a really helpful explanation.

One last question: if I have the piezo oriented correctly, my understanding was that the resitor would remove the random variance and negative 'bouncing' voltage from the piezo and protect the arduino.  Is this not the case?
7  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Very basic resistor/piezo question on: January 24, 2013, 02:00:56 pm
Thanks for the quick reply.

MegaOhm, sorry, should have been clearer.  Will wiring them in parallel not maintain the same voltage in each path while cutting the current (maybe that's the point)?  I may be misunderstanding this...
8  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Very basic resistor/piezo question on: January 24, 2013, 01:18:00 pm
Hi,

Sorry if this is too basic, I did some reading on wikipedia and couldn't find an answer that totally answered my question.  I'm making a knock sensor and all the schematic show a 1 mOhm resistor in parallel to reduce the current/voltage coming into the pin.  My question is: would wiring this in series not reduce the voltage?  Is it in parallel in order to reduce the current?

Thanks, and again, sorry for the basic question.  If anyone has a good source for beginners electronics help it would be greatly appreciated.
9  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: Conflicting Libraries on: January 18, 2013, 03:15:06 pm
Thanks again,

I should have been more clear.  The error I posted there was *almost* what I was experiencing.  The following is the actual error (the only difference is the vector and libraries involved):
Code:
/tmp/build5446.tmp/Tone/Tone.cpp.o: In function `__vector_11':

/Users/oli/Documents/Arduino/libraries/Tone/Tone.cpp:438: multiple definition of `__vector_11'

/tmp/build5446.tmp/Servo/Servo.cpp.o:/Applications/Arduino.app/Contents/Resources/Java/libraries/Servo/Servo.cpp:103: first defined here

I have googled some more and found that the Tone and Servo libraries are using the same timer on the Uno, I think these are necessary for both modules, and don't know if I can change them.

Any thoughts?
10  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: Conflicting Libraries on: January 18, 2013, 08:11:40 am
Thanks for the reply,

I'm at work so I don't have the exact error, but it is almost identical to the following:
Code:
core.a(Tone.cpp.o): In function `__vector_7':

C:\Program Files (x86)\arduino-1.0.1\hardware\arduino\cores\arduino/Tone.cpp:523: multiple definition of `__vector_7'

NewPing\NewPing.cpp.o:C:\Program Files (x86)\arduino-1.0.1\libraries\NewPing/NewPing.cpp:214: first defined here

I also tried searching the libraries for "vector" with no success, my guess is that it is referring to a variable being used within the library (?).

Thanks again.
11  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Conflicting Libraries on: January 17, 2013, 10:15:37 pm
Hi all,

I have found similar questions to this, and I understand (sort of) what the solution is, but was hoping someone might know a bit more about Arduino libraries to help me out.

I am trying to use both the Servo and Tone libraries in a project.  They are conflicting, in particular through the use of vector 11.  I think that I have to either change, or rename, this 'vector' but don't know how to identify a vector within the library '.h' files.

Any help to point me in the right direction would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
12  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: Beginner question: using strings to control pins on: January 15, 2013, 10:01:43 pm
Thanks again... you made me realize the far easier way was to use arrays where the call variable was equal to the pin to call.
13  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: Beginner question: using strings to control pins on: January 15, 2013, 09:44:04 pm
Thanks Archh.  I guess what I'm getting at is: Is there any way to use a variable to assign which pin to control? If so, am I able to use/convert a string to be this variable?

Again, thanks.
14  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Beginner question: using strings to control pins on: January 15, 2013, 09:20:16 pm
Hello,

I'm just starting with Arduino with some experience in other languages (but little in C++). I'm sorry if this question should be asked somewhere else, I did the obligatory searching through this forum and others, but couldn't find anything to help out.

Basically I'm trying to write code that, based on a variable will control LED's connected to different pins.  As the code currently stands, the variables I'm using are Strings.  I imagine this is the root of my problem, but don't know what to do about it.

An example bit of code is:
Code:
int Rled1 = 12;
int Rled2 = 11;

void Setup(){
  pinMode(Rled1, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(Rled2, OUTPUT);
}
void loop(){
  //i have a segment of code here I can confirm is working, through the serial monitor.  get's me to:
  if (var == 1){
    String red_led = "Rled";
    red_led.concat(var); //up till here works
    digitalWrite(red_led, 255);
  }
}
The last line of my code gives the error:
" cannot convert 'String' to 'uint8_t' for argument '1' to 'void digitalWrite(uint8_t, uint8_t)'".

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Pages: [1]