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1  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: LPC810 mini ARM Prozessor in 8 pin dip package on: Today at 10:49:34 am
> should include "Arduino.h" not "arduino.h". I
OK, now it's compiling.
If you want, you can setup the main repository in github. The question is, how can we get my existing library into it.
The next two days I will probably be off, so I will answer later.

I have now set up a github repo https://github.com/bobc/OpenLasp.

I'm not sure what you mean about your existing library, I've already incorporated it! I had to make a few changes, e.g. because an Arduino sketch is a C++ program.  So you will probably want to keep your standalone LPC810 repo separate.

I'll get the upload tool working next.
2  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: LPC810 mini ARM Prozessor in 8 pin dip package on: Today at 03:09:49 am
But when I press "compile", I get the following error:

/home/.../arduino-1.5.7/hardware/OpenNxp/LPC8/cores/lpc810/arduino.c:12:21: fatal error: arduino.h: No such file or directory
 #include "arduino.h"


Where do I have to place the missing header files?

Sorry, that's a problem with case-sensitive file names, in Windows I get lazy. In file "OpenNxp\LPC8\cores\lpc810\arduino.c", it should include "Arduino.h" not "arduino.h". I think that is the only place.
3  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: LPC810 mini ARM Prozessor in 8 pin dip package on: September 18, 2014, 08:00:53 pm
So far we're talking about maybe 3-5 CPUs, does anybody know if the peripherals are the same? Or does that mean 3-5 separate cores?

IME peripherals are only identical within CPU families, e.g. LPC13xx, and may be similar or just quite different between families, so LPC11xx has some completely different peripherals to LPC13xx. e.g. the gpio block is a lot simpler. I haven't looked in detail across the range.

So it might be difficult to create a common library. I still think it is useful to have a single "LPC support package" though. Perhaps the point of commonality is the Arduino API, so at least users can move from one LPC to another with relative ease.

I'd be happy to set up and coordinate github activity. I think I will set up my own repo anyway and anyone can fork it as they wish, and I'd be quite happy to give people access.

Git has a lot of "advanced" features, more than I can fully understand, so I tend to use 2 or 3 basic operations and keep it simple. Github also has some great features which are quite easy to use, like the issue tracker.

I would like to set up a framework for other LPCs, and write some Arduino libs for the ones I have.  Microbuilder have some good code, I think that could be a good starting point.
4  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: LPC810 mini ARM Prozessor in 8 pin dip package on: September 18, 2014, 06:36:39 pm
your work is  great :-)

> I propose to create a github repository to contain the code.
I forked a github repo for LPC-arduino here:
https://github.com/ChrisMicro/LPC810_CodeBase
But I don't know in detail how to work with github project teams.

Thanks, I really just rearranged it smiley

I think it is fairly essential that the git folder structure reflects the target structure, i.e. a user can do a git pull and then copy the tree to Arduino folder. Otherwise it is a nightmare to manage. git doesn't provide an easy way to link files that have the same content, so it's best to copy the ones that are needed to the new place.

Collaboration can be done in github with pull requests which is good for large projects with lots of contributors, but does have more overhead. A lighter method is to specify named collaborators who have full access equivalent to the repo owner., or most often a combination of both.

We could also set up an "Organization" which would perhaps be a cleaner way to do it, I haven't tried that before. Looks pretty easy though. We need to think of a good name for it...
5  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: LPC810 mini ARM Prozessor in 8 pin dip package on: September 18, 2014, 05:21:07 pm
Quote
would it be possible to use the Arduino IDE ( for Arduino DUE ) to compile the code for the LPC810 ?
Not as it is, I think you would have to add your own variant file and core libraries but that's not an area I'm very familiar with.

@Bob/Chris, is it worth trying to develop an LPC Arduino port that will support several versions of LPC? It's certainly been an interest of mine but TBH I'm probably more HW than SW. I can certainly write code (was employed to do so for many years) but it's the toolchain stuff and organisation of files to allow all different CPUs that I struggle with.

Yes and yes! Struggling with toolchains is right up my creek. smiley I have been wanting to get more into extending Arduino IDE so I decided to bite the bullet and have a go. Arduino 1.5.x makes it quite easy, it already has GCC-ARM compiler.

So what I did is take Chris's code and with a few minor changes put it into an Arduino structure. Seems to build OK with the Arduino 1.5.7 IDE but I don't have an 810 to test with. (I've got nearly a dozen LPC dev boards, but nothing with 8xx series, so I have ordered one from ebay.) I haven't looked at uploading, this was more of a test of the concept.

It actually went better than I expected, the Arduino team have made it really easy! Most of the code went into LPC8/cores/lpc810 and the Arduino framework builds it automatically. It should be easy to create new core types and board variants.

I'm not sure where example sketches should go, I compiled the blink sketch for 810 with a small change (include of sketch_ino.h not required), I haven't tried the others.

arduino_lpc810 by donotdespisethesnake, on Flickr

There are some linker warnings I don't really understand, and no doubt some other loose ends, e.g. Linux, Mac etc.

The complete add-on package is attached. It should be unzipped into the Arduino sketch folder, so you get a path like "C:\Users\bob\Documents\Arduino\hardware\OpenNxp\..."

I propose to create a github repository to contain the code. Any comments on that idea or anything else please fire away.

ETA: I've now compiled all the sketches and included into package.
6  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: I need 10 mbyte of ram memory for my arduino on: September 18, 2014, 12:42:31 pm
I think casemod meant that the Mega2560 can address an external RAM chip.

Yes of course, but so what? The OP wants 10MB external RAM, the Mega can address 64KB so is completely inadequate, even if you use several banks.
7  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: I need 10 mbyte of ram memory for my arduino on: September 18, 2014, 12:20:11 pm
The Due chip (SAM3X8E) does have external memory bus, as do some other small ARM chips, but I haven't seen many boards with external bus easily accessible, or with a RAM chip on board.


And also the mega2560 and the Atmega 128


Sure, but nowhere near 10MB!!
8  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: I need 10 mbyte of ram memory for my arduino on: September 17, 2014, 01:45:25 pm
This is an interesting question, unfortunately 10MB falls into "no-mans land". Small micros have RAM in terms of up to 128KB, Linux capable chips have RAM of 256MB or more. 8-16MB is way too much for most micro applications, but not enough to run Linux. So there is a big gap between 128KB to 256MB where few off the shelf boards exist.

The Due chip (SAM3X8E) does have external memory bus, as do some other small ARM chips, but I haven't seen many boards with external bus easily accessible, or with a RAM chip on board.

The SAMA5DS is an Arduino style board with lots of RAM http://www.atmel.com/tools/ATSAMA5D3-XPLD.aspx?tab=overview, which normally runs Linux, but would make an awesome bare-metal Arduino, if anyone has the time to develop the Arduino library for it.

One of the few low cost Cortex M boards I've seen with external RAM is STM32F4 Discovery, which has 8MB, but no Arduino support.
9  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: LPC810 mini ARM Prozessor in 8 pin dip package on: September 16, 2014, 07:45:54 pm
I've got the Seeduino Arch Pro, so I would quite like to do an Arduino API for LPC1768, I've also got a few mini LPC boards which are ripe for Arduinoising (is that a word?).

10  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: LPC810 mini ARM Prozessor in 8 pin dip package on: September 16, 2014, 07:16:34 pm
It was always possible to build C++ code for ARM using Eclipse and the embedded plugin, no dicking around with makefiles required smiley

You can't beat the vendor tools for ease of use though, as long as you don't mind being locked into their parts.



11  Development / Other Software Development / Re: How about including an "XLoader" program in arduino distribution? on: September 16, 2014, 01:47:36 pm
Xloader is a Windows .NET program which is a wrapper for avrdude, which is what the Arduino IDE also uses. You can run avrdude from a DOS prompt already, without needing Arduino IDE.

I suppose it is convenient to have a GUI for avrdude, it should be quite simple to implement (not sure what it does with libusb though).

There already seem to be several GUI for wrappers, not sure it's worth implementing another one, since there are several ways to do the same thing. Perhaps if someone could persusde the XLoader author to donate the source code to GPL would be the best way forward.

12  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: LPC810 mini ARM Prozessor in 8 pin dip package on: September 16, 2014, 01:27:37 pm
There was only a precompilde C compiler

https://launchpad.net/~terry.guo/+archive/ubuntu/gcc-arm-embedded

so I used C.

GCC includes a C++ compiler!

The LPC chips are good, I have done a few projects with them. I've mostly used free tools, though I did pay for a license for a vendor neutral tool to get JTAG debugging, but TBH it was not great value for money.

The ARM vendors seem to be competing by offering free IDEs, which is a great for us. Arduino everywhere!
13  Community / Gigs and Collaborations / Re: New tool for Arduino IDE on: September 15, 2014, 01:10:35 pm
If compiler can "assemble " the used / working stuff, why it could not be modified to delete  unused function?

The linker produces a list of discarded things, including function names , so this could be used to edit source files for specific cases. A completely general solution is impossible because of the macro preprocessor - the source code seen by the compiler may not correspond at all to the original input file.

If I want to keep old code for a bit I put it inside #ifdef OLD ... #endif. That guarantees it won't bloat the object code and is easy to tidy up later.
14  Using Arduino / Installation & Troubleshooting / Re: Arduino Due R3 with "No Device Connected" Error and no solution working so far on: September 13, 2014, 09:00:42 am
5) The USB-Cable I use seems to work fine, with my Galaxy S3 and during a Loopback Test (!!!), which is why I do not think the connection is the problem here

Rule #1 of troubleshooting : never assume anything.

The fact you have verify failures strongly suggests a hardware error. Therefore it's either the cable or the board. It's cheaper and easy to try a different cable. If it works with other devices that does not really help, because in those other cases you are not trying to program a chip.



15  Using Arduino / Installation & Troubleshooting / Re: Arduino Due R3 with "No Device Connected" Error and no solution working so far on: September 13, 2014, 06:16:58 am
You don't say how/where you got the USB drivers, it would be a good idea to install the latest. Sometimes it seems that Windows does not pick up later drivers if the device already has an earlier driver. What I do is uninstall the USB device, (and in extreme cases find the oemxxxx.ini file in Windows and delete it).

You may have found it already, but the correct sequence for erase is : press and hold erase, press and release reset, release erase.

After doing an erase, you should be able to program via the native port even if the 16u2 is faulty, as the native port goes straight to the bootloader running on the SAM3X.

it may seem unlikely, but sometimes it is worth trying a different/better USB cable. Some cables of poor quality sort of work but not properly.
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