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1  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Laser harp. on: May 27, 2013, 01:03:50 am
Yes, I would also like to see if I can do MIDI output. Not sure how, though I did find a tutorial for it on the playground. And Grumpy_Mike (it's weird referring to people by usernames...) how did do a wave table? Sounds like what I's want to do.
2  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: on/off electrical component based on voltage on: May 27, 2013, 12:59:57 am
pito: more like attached diagram, but instead of pushbuttons, photoresistors acting similarly in an on/off way. (unrelated, what did you use to make that diagram?)

AmiLobe: Yes, I think that is what I am going for. I'm not really understanding how you are doing this though (I'm new to electronics) , could you possibly make a circuit diagram? Also, is there a way to take the output of that circuit into a clear binary number you could use to determine which photoresistors are below a certain resistance?

sparkylabs: I'm just trying to avoid multiplexing, seeing if I can do it like this.

And I might be trying to go about this all wrong. Should I just use multiplexing? Is there an easier way you can think of?
Thanks,
James D.
3  Using Arduino / General Electronics / on/off electrical component based on voltage on: May 25, 2013, 07:24:35 pm
So I am attempting to make a resistor ladder type thing to be the input for a keyboard instrument, but here is my problem: I want to be able to make multiple tones through one input. I know I could do this with muliplexing, but I thought I'd ask here first. Is there some sort of electrical component (or combination thereof) that I can use that basically says "If the current going through me is below x amount, allow y amount. If it's above this, output no current" Because I'd like to have photoresistors chained together and then through 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128 ohm resistors, and be able to round or something similar in code and have it return to me a reliably accurate binary reading of which photoresistors are having light shined on them. Then I could just convert the number to binary and use a bitmask to determine which are tripped from the decimal value that it returns (if you don't know code for whatever reason, just ignore that last part.)
I just think that this method might be less messy than messing with all kinds of multiplexing. If not, tell me and I'll figure out the multiplexing and do it that way!
Thanks,
James D.
4  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Which photodiode? on: April 25, 2013, 09:42:57 pm
Well the actual sensor will be covered, but I do wonder if I could just get a strip of the material that's made out of, just to block out all the light that could get in...
Or maybe just get a strip of black fabric that could be stapled in between the laser and the sensor, and the rest enclosed. Then the intensity of the laser could get through, but very little other light
5  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Which photodiode? on: April 25, 2013, 07:17:37 pm
What photodiode would be best for getting a good reading from a green laser? I'm currently finding all of the parts for my project, and the site for the lasers I plan to use does not specify a wavelength, only a colour. I don't very well understand the jargon used in the specs, so I was hoping someone here would! The laser will be pointing at this photodiode from no more than a foot or two away, and it's important that they don't pick up anything other than the laser pointing at it. Link to the laser I will likely use: http://www.fasttech.com/product/1088900-new-wish-5mw-green-laser-module The actual laser module I use may change, but it will always be green.
Thanks,
James D.
6  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Laser harp. on: March 05, 2013, 07:58:48 pm
Yeah, I was planning on making the concept first, one string, then 8, then the full thing etc. and the only reason I meant to use the LEDs was price, and I couldn't find another way to do it... Could you link me to this photo transistor you speak of?
EDIT: Someone already showed me a good photo-sensor on a different thread
7  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Laser harp. on: March 04, 2013, 11:31:39 pm
Hey, so I'm pretty new to Arduino, and this is my first project. This should've been my first post, but I already posted questions about this project (with the same main bulk of the post) in other forum subsets.
A long time ago I was shown a YouTube video of this guy who had made a "laser harp" where if you broke the stream of a laser with your hand, it would register that and make a sound. I want to supersize this project, making essentially a table (imagine a hollow coffee table with lasers running through it) of 64 lasers and sensors. (It came to that happy number because, since I am a pianist, I decided to make the "strings" 3/4 inch apart, and the table 4' long)
So far, I don't have any hardware, but I have these sources:
Using LEDs for light sensing http://playground.arduino.cc//Learning/LEDSensor
Laser module: http://lightake.com/detail.do/sku.Arduino_5V_650nm_PCB_Laser_Diode_Module___Black-58601?gclid=CLLGvfvO37UCFa9aMgod9wMAIw
LEDs to be used as sensors http://lightake.com/detail.do/sku.Arduino_3MM_Red___Green_Color_LED_Common_Cathode_Module___Black-58598
MIDI: http://arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/Midi
and Audio output http://www.instructables.com/id/Arduino-Audio-Output/

I have already have pretty extensive knowledge of the ROBOTC programming knowledge which I plan to use to progam this project from VEX (Woo! 6252 The Surge!), so I don't think I'll be needing any help with that, just hardware. I am also currently in a Computer Applications class where we are briefly touching on Arduino, so I can use that as a resource for early testing and such, and learning basic hardware and such. I also know some circuitry from one of my other classes. Hoping you guys can help me out with starting this project as soon as VEX season gives me a little time to do it.
Thanks,
James D.
8  Using Arduino / Audio / 3.5 headphone and 1/4 cable, and MIDI output with Arduino powered instrument on: March 04, 2013, 11:21:40 pm
Hey, so I'm pretty new to Arduino, and this is my second forum post.
A long time ago I was shown a YouTube video of this guy who had made a "laser harp" where if you broke the stream of a laser with your hand, it would register that and make a sound. I want to supersize this project, making essentially a table (imagine a hollow coffee table with lasers running through it) of 64 lasers and sensors. (It came to that happy number because, since I am a pianist, I decided to make the "strings" 3/4 inch apart, and the table 4' long)
I didn't know exactly where to post this, so I decided to break it up into a few different topics, this being my second post. (First one was in multiplexing about using 64 LED inputs)
I wanted to know how to output sounds, sound files, etc. hopefully simultaneously to the 3.5mm traditional headphone-style jack, the 1/4 inch guitar style patch, and output as a MIDI controller like a piano would, based on sensor values.
Thanks,
James D.
9  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Multiplexing with 64 LED light sensor inputs on: March 04, 2013, 11:17:38 pm
Hey, so I'm pretty new to Arduino, and this is my first forum post.
A long time ago I was shown a YouTube video of this guy who had made a "laser harp" where if you broke the stream of a laser with your hand, it would register that and make a sound. I want to supersize this project, making essentially a table (imagine a hollow coffee table with lasers running through it) of 64 lasers and sensors. (It came to that happy number because, since I am a pianist, I decided to make the "strings" 3/4 inch apart, and the table 4' long)
I didn't know exactly where to post this, so I decided to break it up into a few different topics. The first and most pressing concern for me is this: How am I going to use 64 inputs, and what hardware do I need to do that?
I want to use the method described here: http://playground.arduino.cc//Learning/LEDSensor to make light sensors, so I need to do that for 64 LEDs. How do I go about this? What hardware do I need? Boards, breadboxes?
Thanks,
James D.
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