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1  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Labeling: Have any tricks/tips for identifying your DIY PCB's pins etc.? on: April 02, 2013, 04:20:34 pm
Greetings,
    For my project(s) I've decided to not going the manufacturing route, but I still need to find a way of labelling the pins and components. I'm not using a mask, but the board will be painted/covered. I'm not talking about hand drawing them on with markers, smiley-grin, trying to keep it quality. Although it doesn't exactly have to be Arduino quality.

One option I was thinking of, would be to outsource a sticker design that covered the whole board. Which layout had the numbers and connections exempt. So when the PCB is painted/paint marker/covered it would leave the number behind.

But I'm always open to other solutions.Care to share any tricks or tips how you did it? Or is there a local service I could inquery about doing the printing? I wouldn't even know where to start searching for such a thing. Trying to avoid services online. Maybe there exist a very tiny stamp? lol

              Thanks,
2  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: An Attiny85 I/O Network on: March 29, 2013, 12:45:07 pm
This is the design for the higher level boards. The 3D models aren't accurate connection wise. LED Pin won't be there but I had to represent them somehow.

3  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: An Attiny85 I/O Network on: March 29, 2013, 03:34:50 am
I pray to the pcb layout gods this is the last base board I'll need to design for this project. And I couldn't find a way to make them all equal. Adding being I'm not going to manufacturer these now, I can use what double sided clad I have. Honestly I don't think its possible on single. . .

If it works I will not be making anymore changes. Fingers crossed, I'm going to start putting together the top boards.

(Excuse the bottom right route, I know its touching.)
4  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: An Attiny85 I/O Network on: March 28, 2013, 07:22:41 pm
Now, I pretty sure I would like all the boards made equal. But they will still have all the functionality as before.

Just trying to point out that 1 board can run many leds in different ways. 1 board per led is amazingly inefficient in terms of cost, materials and time. It even multiplies the number of chips you have to re-program with all that goes with that. For what you do, you don't really need boards, just something to hold parts together and attach to enclosure or mounting. A lot of things can be built right onto/into cabling.

I can get up to 32-pin narrow IC sockets for 15 cents each, maybe less in quantity.
http://www.futurlec.com/SockIC.shtml

I get small generic boards with hole pads and finger edges, they run over a buck each in 5 to 10.
 



Why would you buy an Arduino to run a single LED? As I explained how this could running LED's, that is isn't the only and intended purpose.

As of now, one Analog pin is connected to the on board LED. But all 5 Attiny85 I/O pins communicates up to the next board, as well as they all go outwards (no pull down) via headers if you wanted to use jumper wires to go out to a breadboard etc.

As for selling these, I only want to sell one or two sets to make my money back so I can throw back towards another project. There are many ways to skin a cat, these will be made on PCB's.
5  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: An Attiny85 I/O Network on: March 27, 2013, 11:44:27 pm
Trying to find a good solution for switch between the 5v USBasp ISP and the 5v-15v DC jack. I'm sure I can figure it out but if you have a simple solution I'm all ears.

One thing that is mind numbing, so currently I have a resistor on each I/O going "up" for the pull down. I'm curious if would it would be possible to use just a single resistor for all of them? But being their not all on at the same time, or if they were by chance. I don't know to even where to start with that formula. Maybe I could just calculate for them all to be on, and still get a good pull down result if only one is actually sending.
6  Community / Exhibition / Gallery / Re: Heated water bowl for the backyard wildlife on: March 27, 2013, 12:27:18 am
Buy a man a hotpocket, feed him for a day. Teach a man to shock small critters unconscious with an arduino, feed him for a lifetime.  smiley-cool

The saying goes something like that. smiley-razz
7  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: An Attiny85 I/O Network on: March 26, 2013, 11:34:24 pm
If swapping out the microcontroller to program it bugs you, there's always the option of putting a 6 pin header on your board and programming them in-place too.  If you add a dedicated programming board, are you thinking that would just be a set of headers and some kind of switch to select the target uC to program?  If so that sounds like headers on each uC level would be cheaper/simpler to me, but entirely your call of course.

Cheers !
Geoff

I know what I said before, but things change as new ideas develop.

Now, I pretty sure I would like all the boards made equal. But they will still have all the functionality as before. 

I think that is possible with the USBasp. Cuts down on: costs, overall work, wires and frees up my Arduino. The most practical solution I can see is simply adding a few male pins for the 5x2 native USBasp connection.

To be honest, I'm very unsure. New territory for me. So your input is very much appreciated.

____

On a side note, one thing I forgot was 10k pull-down required between signals. AH, that is going to be hard to incorporate. Probably have to use a DIP switch.
8  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: An Attiny85 I/O Network on: March 26, 2013, 03:49:51 pm
You guys are something else! Thanks for all the help. That's great to hear the reg. situation can be simplified.

Back to square one I suppose.

I've got one other question if you don't mind. As for programming the boards, it would cost far more in resources to make a dedicated "ISP programming board". Trying to cut down on my budget and overall costs, couldn't I just add a 2x5 pin shroud to each board and use the USBasp ISP programmer? (Haven't tried out that programmer yet.)

Maybe its just me, but I don't like using the Arduino to program Attinys. Switching out chips back and forth and whatnot.
9  Community / Exhibition / Gallery / Re: Analog VU meter and Clock on: March 25, 2013, 09:11:59 pm
Where's the buzzer smiley-razz
10  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: An Attiny85 I/O Network on: March 25, 2013, 07:54:16 pm
What was the reason for multiplying the regulators?  How many ATTinies was that to run?

You can fit 3 Tiny85's on a single 24-pin socket. Each one can put a lot of attention on something.

But if all you want to do is blink lights the 1 Tiny and a set of shift registers will do for many leds.



That is a good idea, but how would you manage the routing of x3 5v regulators on a single sided copper clad board though? That was the real issue.

You don't need a separate regulator per chip. If you get a 5V regulated USB charger for power or any other 5V regulated (you can go with less BTW) power supply then you don't need any regulator on board. Just make sure that your supply has enough amps to run your project, those high-bright leds do suck current and IMO it's better to run them off power that doesn't go through the MCU.

3 on a socket just puts the pins closer. With a little creative work you won't need a PCB either. Just solder, add heatsinks as needed and maybe pot the works for durability and to save on an enclosure.

Well, how many Attiny85's can I run on a single regulator without risking overheating it? Perhaps that is also an input question as well.

I choose 4 regs., for 4 micro processors because it was a safe assumption and guaranteed all would be "fed" properly. I want all Attiny's to have an output of 4+v.

Thanks for the tip on the power/leds btw. I would agree. (On the single boards above that is a lower power led).
11  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: An Attiny85 I/O Network on: March 24, 2013, 11:35:18 pm
You can fit 3 Tiny85's on a single 24-pin socket. Each one can put a lot of attention on something.

But if all you want to do is blink lights the 1 Tiny and a set of shift registers will do for many leds.



That is a good idea, but how would you manage the routing of x3 5v regulators on a single sided copper clad board though? That was the real issue.
12  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / How I fixed: "avrdude: stk500_getsync(): not in sync: resp=0x00" / Attiny85 on: March 24, 2013, 11:03:31 pm
Greetings,
   Earlier today while messing around with some Attiny85's, out of the blue I started getting "avrdude: stk500_getsync(): not in sync: resp=0x00."  :'{

   I spent 3 long hours. . . digging through online remedies, reasoning, and theories but nothing I found worked. I knew my setup was correct or it was something beyond my control. Luckily, I eventually found a remedy. I can't tell you why it worked, but it did, and that is enough for me smiley-grin Adding you don't constantly have to switch Boards and programmers constantly just increasing the confusion with this. It should also help eliminate USB issues.

   Just thought I'd share and maybe I can spare someone else the annoyance.

How to:

1. Save your projects somewhere safe, and delete everything you got Arduino software wise. Fresh slate.

2. Download the Arduino IDE 1.0.4 (http://arduino.cc/en/main/software)

3. Extract the contents and rename it to something like "IDE_Attiny". Then extract it again and rename it to "IDE_Arduino". The names don't matter but you want 2 complete IDE's in separate folders.

4. Download (https://code.google.com/p/arduino-tiny/downloads/detail?name=arduino-tiny-0100-0015.zip) and place the contents only in your "IDE_Attiny"'s hardware folder overwriting when prompted.

5. Now start the 2, seperate Attiny and Arduino IDE's/.exe's. Windows you should have 2 separate IDE icons in the task bar.

6. Setup your ArduinoISP example sketch in the .exe from the "IDE_Arduino" folders and upload. (Don't connect the Reset Cap, yet.)

Tools>Board=Arduino(*)
COM=Whatever COM you use
Programmer=AVR ISP (first option)

7. Then setup your Attiny85 on the other "IDE_Attiny". Connect the Reset Cap. then upload.

Tools>Board>Attiny85(*)
COM = COM
Programmer=Arduino as ISP
Burn Bootloader if you changed mhz

Visit this link if you need wiring assistance. (http://hlt.media.mit.edu/?p=1706)

      Hope it helps somebody,
13  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: An Attiny85 I/O Network on: March 24, 2013, 03:08:53 pm
Well, here's what I came up with. If you have any questions feel free, or if you see any errors in there let me know.

If your the lazy sort, I will be selling a few assembled boards on ebay soon (or side deal here), so keep an eye out for those. I'll post here when they are ready. Also feel free to use any of these for yourself if you wish.

Gallery: http://imgur.com/GwgIE7b,xspwvq2,886KyVV#1

Schematic image size too large, see gallery or files.



For printing purposes:


Files: (Includes images + parts list)
(Moderator edit: link to scamming website removed)
14  Topics / Product Design / Re: PCB Material Type on: March 24, 2013, 01:36:30 pm
You could try covering your pads and spraypainting the board, or use nail polish.

Do you have a good method for covering the pads?

I think nail polish would get pretty messy and most likely remove the paint from the surrounding PCB paint as well?

What about stickers? Though it may be difficult to find little dots that small. I've seen 1/8 are readily available.

So etch
Apply stickers/dots
spray paint
remove stickers



15  Topics / Product Design / Re: Associate a button to an mp3 on: March 24, 2013, 01:23:25 pm
You may also want to look into some type of Amplifier.

I don't have much experience here, but from what I've seen of Arduinos playing music, the volume maybe quite low.
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