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1  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: programming atmega328 w/ arduino code using usb to serial module on: May 19, 2014, 11:25:36 pm
Ahh, I did not realize a cap was required. I set one up and it works now. Thanks!
2  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / programming atmega328 w/ arduino code using usb to serial module on: May 19, 2014, 11:05:15 pm
Hey folks,

I'm having trouble programming my atmega328 with a usb to serial adapter I got. So I bought one of these adapters right here: http://www.ebay.com/itm/281157340820?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649
The problem is I'm not 100% sure on how to the thing up and I'm also not sure how set up the arduino IDE for use with it either.

Right now I basically have some sort of an arduino on a breadboard set up to run a simple blink program. It is blinking as intended and is working fine. However, I can't seem to get the usb module to work for programming the setup. No matter what arrangement I try it gives that "Non in sync" error.

The pins on the module read as follows:
GRN DTR
RX
TX
VCC
CTS
BLK GND

I know where some of these are supposed get hooked up but not all of them. I pretty sure VCC goes to the +5v pin, BLK GND goes to ground, RX goes to TX on the chip, TX goes to RX on the chip.
The other two, CTS and GRN DTR, I am not too sure about. I tried conecting GRN DTR to the reset pin but it didn't seem to help much.

So, does anybody know how I should wire this up so that I would be able to program the chip?

And then my next issue: How should I set up the Arduino IDE to program with this? What should the programmer option be set to? And what board type should I set it to?


Thanks in advance!
3  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: I accidentally bought non-polar 10uf caps... on: May 18, 2014, 09:22:05 am
Awesome, that's great to know!

Thanks a bunch.
4  Using Arduino / General Electronics / I accidentally bought non-polar 10uf caps... on: May 18, 2014, 09:14:43 am
Hey there, so like the title says I accidentally bought some SMD 10uF caps that are non-polar when I wanted polarized ones.

My question is, could they still work? I'm still learning a lot about electronics and I'm particularly unfamiliar with capacitors it seems, so I could really use some help from somebody a bit more knowledgeable.

So what I'm trying to do is set up an Arduino system as layed out by this tutorial: http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Standalone
The only difference is I'm trying to do it with SMD components for a project I'm working on. I'm not really too sure what the 10uF caps around the 5v regulator are for, so can anybody tell me if there's any way non-polar caps could do the trick here?

Sorry, I feel like a dingus having to ask a question like this... I also really hope this works because I don't really have the time to wait for new components to arrive if I have to order some.
5  Using Arduino / Installation & Troubleshooting / Questions about the arduino bootloader. on: March 29, 2014, 02:41:08 pm
Hello, I have a question regarding the Arduino bootloader, as I'm still a little confused even after reading a bit about it.

So it's to my understanding that the bootloader is used so that you don't need external hardware to upload code to the chip. I've read that it is not necessary in all circumstances to have the bootloader when uploading Arduino code, is this true?

I know in the past I have programmed external atmega328 chips on a breadboard by attaching it to an arduino uno's RX, TX, ground, 5V, and reset pins (Oh, and the arduino had its DIP socket empty). To be honest, I don't remember if this chip had the bootloader on it or not. For this method of programming is the bootloader required?

I have also been looking at these serial USB programmers:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/10pcs-FT232RL-USB-To-Serial-Adapter-Module-USB-TO-232-Download-Cable-For-Arduino-/281234998607?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item417ae9854f

If I were to use one of these to program the chip, is a bootloader required?

Thanks in advance to anybody who has input!
6  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: My Arduino Nano decided to stop working? on: May 10, 2013, 09:06:51 pm
Alright, so I found my multimeter and tested as suggested. There did not appear to be 5V present so I suppose the diode is indeed shot.

Now I guess my question is what could have caused that to happen? It literally just happened out of nowhere while it was plugged into my computer.
7  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: My Arduino Nano decided to stop working? on: May 09, 2013, 09:41:20 pm
OK

Yes I saw your first post Runaway Pancake and I guess you didn't see my response where I said I wasn't sure what you were asking...

Well, given --

DVDdoug:
I'm not really sure what you're trying to say... I see the portion of the schematic your referring to but what am I supposed to do with this? Sorry...
I'm not DVDdoug, so I jumped right over that.



My apologies, I meant to put your name.

Well I am now home but I can't seem to find my multimeter anywhere... I guess we'll have to put this endeavor on hold until I find it. Unless somebody else has advice.

I'd like to thank everybody who has given me feedback so far, I really appreciate it!
8  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: My Arduino Nano decided to stop working? on: May 09, 2013, 08:35:27 pm
Plug your Nano into the USB
Get out your voltmeter.
If you don't measure 5V with the positive lead on "5V" and the negative lead on one of the Nano's "Gnd" terminals then that aforementioned diode is b-a-d.

Okay thank you. I will check that right when I get home and I'll tell you the results
9  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: My Arduino Nano decided to stop working? on: May 09, 2013, 08:25:44 pm
Am I here?
Like I said in Reply #2:
Look to see if there is 5V at the 5V pin when it's plugged in to the USB connector.
If there's not then that diode is shot.

Yes I saw your first post Runaway Pancake and I guess you didn't see my response where I said I wasn't sure what you were asking...

Can you please explain what you mean? I'm sorry, I guess I don't know enough about this to know what you're telling me to do. Do you mean with like a multimeter or something?
10  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: My Arduino Nano decided to stop working? on: May 09, 2013, 07:55:51 pm
Shouldn't the resistors I have drop the current enough to prevent that kind of damage?
No, I didn't see the resistors.  my bad.

I'd still check to see if the diode is damaged, that's the gate between the regulator/5V pin and Vusb.

Okay, I will. However, do you know where it might be located? because if it is on the underside I have no way to get to it since my nano is directly soldered in place.
11  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: My Arduino Nano decided to stop working? on: May 09, 2013, 07:41:24 pm
There is a diode between Vusb and 5V.

http://arduino.cc/en/uploads/Main/ArduinoNano30Schematic.pdf

I don't know what that IC does, but if it doesn't limit the current to those LEDs (I'm betting on, it doesn't) then you may have drawn enough current to damage that diode.

While connected to USB, I would measure the voltage across both sides of the diode.

Shouldn't the resistors I have drop the current enough to prevent that kind of damage? I don't know if you can see them but there are 8 of them (one for each row on the screen) right up against the nano.

Oh and the IC is just a shift register.
12  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: My Arduino Nano decided to stop working? on: May 09, 2013, 07:37:01 pm
DVDdoug:

I'm not really sure what you're trying to say... I see the portion of the schematic your referring to but what am I supposed to do with this? Sorry...

ebird97:

well the main portion of the arduino must still be functional if it can still run when powered by the 9v battery, so what exactly would I be looking for when probing?
13  Using Arduino / General Electronics / My Arduino Nano decided to stop working? on: May 09, 2013, 06:18:10 pm
Hello,

So I have this little 8x8 led matrix game powered by an arduino Nano here:


The little thing was working just fine and dandy for quite some time until a couple of days ago the whole USB computer interface stopped working entirely. I was just in the middle of using it hooked up to my computer when it just stopped powering on. I unplugged it and replugged it in a few times to see if I could get it to work with no luck.

 If I power it on by using a 9v battery (like in the next picture) it is able to function. The led on the arduino lights up and the LED matrix lights up.


now, it should do the exact same thing when I plug it into my computer by USB. However, when I do that now nothing happens at all. The led doesn't light up and my computer doesn't even seem to recognize it:


But it definitely isn't the computer or the cable's fault, because I have an identical Nano that when plugged into the same computer with the same cable it powers up fine:


This would lead me to believe that it is probably a hardware issue on the arduino, but I checked out the physical plug and compared to my spare arduino nano. The connector looks to be identical and doesn't look damaged in any way.

So this means that it isn't the being caused by a fault in the actual circuit, it isn't the computer's/cable's fault, it isn't the plug's fault, but what could it be?

Thanks in advance to anybody who has any advice!


14  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: Programming an Atmega328 using an Arduino Uno on: May 07, 2013, 07:28:06 am
Thanks for all of the help, guys. I found out that the problem was as many of you suggested the caps on the crystal were too high. They were actually .1uF caps that somehow managed to find themselves into a bag in my drawer labeled 22pF. I should really be more careful next time I do some cleaning up...

I just want to say I really appreciate how helpful the arduino community is. I've had many silly questions like this (and I'm sure many to come...) that you guys have happily answered for me.

Thanks!
15  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: Programming an Atmega328 using an Arduino Uno on: May 06, 2013, 07:40:18 pm
First thing, never connect a LED directly to an output pin and power or ground.  You should always have at least a 220 ohm or higher resistor in series with the LED.  Even though it may seem to work with no harm, you could be damaging the ATmega328P chip by drawing too much current through the port.

Which method of programming are you using?  Are you removing the m328p from the Uno, or have a separate m328p to program with?



Oh, I didn't realize it really mattered that much to put the led directly to the pin. I usually do use a resistor but I guess I didn't realize it was this important. I'll do that from now on, thank you!
As for your question, this was a chip taken directly out of my current Uno.
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