Show Posts
Pages: 1 ... 80 81 [82] 83 84 ... 92
1216  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: How do I make a resistive touch switch? on: May 03, 2010, 03:41:24 am
Retro:
Makes sense now.  Thanks. :-)
1217  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: How do I make a resistive touch switch? on: May 02, 2010, 12:16:32 pm
Hm...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multimeter

It would appear that in reality 2K might actually mean 1.999~ which would make more sense.  I guess maybe it's an accuracy thing or something?  Getting the most out of the display?  Still not really sure why it's not 10K though.  9.9999 would still make more use of the display than 1.9999.
1218  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: How do I make a resistive touch switch? on: May 02, 2010, 12:09:10 pm
That seems kinda silly.  So does that mean in any mode the highest number it will display is 2.0?  Why 2.0?  Why not 2000?  And why 2K?  Why not 1K?
1219  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: How do I make a resistive touch switch? on: May 02, 2010, 11:28:48 am
I'm not getting anything out of my multimeter, whether it's set to 200 ohms, 2K, 20K 200K or 2000K.  At least not on my finger.  It reads .820 when I've got it across an 820 ohm resistor on the 2K setting.  Not sure why the setting is called 2K when it's obviously reading 1K as 1.0, but nothing in electronics ever seems to make sense to me.  

Anyway, I know it's working.  But I suspect my finger's resistance is indeed somewhere in the 10M ohm range, so the meter can't read it.
1220  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: How do I make a resistive touch switch? on: May 02, 2010, 11:12:21 am
I have a multimeter, but I'm not really sure how to use it.  I'll try to figre out how to get it to measure resistance though. :-)

As for whether the gizmo uses a resitive switch, I'm pretty sure it does:
http://www.cylandprops.com/PKEmeterp1.html

Note the four wires at the top of the handle:


Also on the front of the meter:


Unfortunately, not much can be told from the internals. :-)
1221  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: How do I make a resistive touch switch? on: May 02, 2010, 10:29:37 am
But 4.7K seems way too low.  Even if it were paired with a resistor.  Most of the examples I've been able to find for these sorts of switches reccomend resistances as high as 10M ohms...
1222  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: How do I make a resistive touch switch? on: May 02, 2010, 10:01:49 am
4.7K pot on the other side of what?
1223  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / How do I make a resistive touch switch? on: May 02, 2010, 01:45:37 am
I've been searching for schematics on the web for how to make a touch switch, but 90% of what I find either shows how to make a capacitive touch switch, or has all these extra components like transistors and nand gates which confuse me as to how to make it function with the Arduino.

I need a resistive touch switch for two reasons:

1)  I'm building a replica prop, and the original uses a resistive touch switch, so for authneticity's sake I want to mimic this.

2) I'm fairly certain that a resisitve touch switch is not unlike a potentiometer and as such requires only one pin to function.  Capacitance switches appear to require two.

I found this post dealing with them:
http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1264609996

But the ascii schematics aren't clear.

I'm pretty sure that what PaulS is trying to show is the following:



And I suspect that the reason mburkit was having issues is because he connected the circuit up this way:



...and because he used a 10K resistor which according to this page is much less than the resistance of skin:
http://www.produceconsumerobot.com/truth/


Other pages I've read seem to indicate that the finger should have a lower resistance than the resistor you use in the circuit.  Which if I understand how potetiometers work, makes perfect sense.

And that page seems to indicate that a human finger has a resistance somehwere between 50K and 10M ohms.  Though I'm sure this probably differs based on how far apart you have the contacts.  (Mine will have 0.2" (5mm) or less seperation.)

But it also says a 10M resistor makes the signal noisy, so I dunno.  And PaulS didn't specify the size of resistor needed.


Also, assuming PaulS's cicuit works, I am concerned about something in the design.  When you place your finger across the terminals, they have a lot of resistance, and things are hunky-dory.  But what happens if a piece of metal accidentally comes in contact with them?  Then there's no resistor between the +5v and the pin of the Arduino.  Is that a problem?  I'm not sure, but I think that would let hundreds of milliamps of current flow and would fry the Arduino.

So to prevent the Arduino from being fried, I think I should use one of the following setups.  I suppose it doesn't matter which, since R2 would only be 1K or so.  Though perhaps it should be larger than that?  






Another thing that concerns me is how much current will be flowing across your finger.  I saw something that said 10mA is painful, and 40mA is dangerous.  But is that a concern with a battery?  I don't know.  But I could select the size of R2 to get the mA down into a safe range if that's an issue.  I suspect it isn't though.

Speaking of which, I found this page on wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_shock

Which says the resistance of skin is 1K to 100K, which is quite a bit  different from what that other page said.  

So much conflicting info. smiley-sad


Anyway, one last thing...

When no connection is being made, do you suppose the Arduino will return 0 for the value on the analog port, or might I want to treat say, any value less than 512 as an off state?  I suppose I may need to do debouncing as well because this switch will need to toggle an action.  There's a debounce library right?  I'm sure I saw one.
1224  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: Could someone take a quick peek at these PCB's? on: April 28, 2010, 08:05:54 pm
Well, I put the order in for these today.  Hopefully if there are any glitches they can be fixed with the extra pads I put on the board.  I could spend several months on this and still not be sure I've got everything right.

Assuming all goes well, I'll post some videos in the exhibition forum around May 18th when I'll have gotten the boards back and had time to put them together.

Thanks for all the help!
1225  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: Could someone take a quick peek at these PCB's? on: April 28, 2010, 09:52:15 am
Quote
Anyway, if this was my board, I would move the mode and Arduino power traces over to the right and snake a ground trace from the batteries, jog right and beside the power trace up to the ground pin of the Arduino, rather than sending it up to the LEDs, and then over to the Arduino.

I assume you mean connect the ground trace to the ground pin on the right side of the Arduino.

Problem with that is then the Pot1 and R4 grounds have to go through the small traces on the Arduino.  And I'm guessing that if everyone feels these ground traces need to be thicker, taking that shortcut would be bad.


Quote
I was having a hard time figuring out the A4/A5 box in the upper right.  Is that a jumper?

If by jumper you mean a place where I can solder a couple wires to connect to those analog pins on the Arduino because they're in the middle of Arduino instead of at the edge where they would be more easily acessable, then yes.

If by jumper you mean a couple pins I intend to short, then no.


Quote
Anyway, I would rotate it and move it above R4 and put an .1 bypass on the Arduino in its place.

I'm not sure what you're suggesting.  What's a .1 bypass and where would that go?


Quote
It's okay to put the 47ufd across the battery, although it would be more common to put it after the power switch.  No harm where it is.

Too late, already fixed. :-)
1226  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: Could someone take a quick peek at these PCB's? on: April 28, 2010, 09:40:24 am
Rerouted the capacitor so it's across the power switch:

1227  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: Could someone take a quick peek at these PCB's? on: April 28, 2010, 09:00:50 am
Hm... should I have connected C1 across the battery termianls like that?  I'm thinking that might drain them, though I have no idea if that would take days, weeks, or months to have any effect.

I'm thinking maybe I should have connected it to the line coming off the power switch that goes to the Raw pin on the Arduino.
1228  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: Could someone take a quick peek at these PCB's? on: April 28, 2010, 08:50:44 am
Well, I worked on the circuit all night cleaning up the traces for power and ground which I wasn't happy with, changing the angles of some traces to take them further away from the corners of the square pads, and adding some additional pads which might come in useful for correcting problems or adding new features.  I also moved those vertical traces on the EGB screen away from the pads a bit.

Here's the final result for the controller boards:

1229  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: Could someone take a quick peek at these PCB's? on: April 28, 2010, 08:44:34 am
west:
Thanks, that's what I thought!

1230  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: Could someone take a quick peek at these PCB's? on: April 27, 2010, 11:06:56 pm
I've lookd everywhere, but I can't find any examples of anyone decoupling a ULN2803 darlington array.  I see how you decouple an IC with a Vcc pin, but the 2803 doesn't work like that.  There's a Com pin, which I don't have connected in my circuit (per Grumpy Mike's suggestion) which I see is standard practice when connecting it to LED arrays.  It is connected when powering stepper motors.  I think it's to reroute the voltage spikes when the motor stops.  
Pages: 1 ... 80 81 [82] 83 84 ... 92