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31  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Does the Micro come with the default Atmel 32U4 bootloader from the factory? on: June 22, 2014, 08:17:51 am
Does the Arduino Micro come with the default Atmel 32U4 bootloader from the factory?

I suspect not.  If not, why not?  It is incompatible with the Arduino IDE?  Or does it perhaps require the additional step of pressing a program button as with some of Atmel's other USB boards?

I ask because I was thinking about designing a 32U4 board without an ISP header on there by default, and just use the USB to program it, but that would be silly if I had to have the header there to put the bootloader on the chip in the first place.
32  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: Trying to figure out how to add A3BU XPLAINED to Xmegduino, but I'm a bit lost. on: June 17, 2014, 08:13:40 am
But where is the spec for those files so I know how to create a new entry?  Not all entries  have the same parameters.

I googled it and found several pages with specs but at least one says it's a proposed spec and I can't tell if they're official or not.
33  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Trying to figure out how to add A3BU XPLAINED to Xmegduino, but I'm a bit lost. on: June 16, 2014, 06:15:18 pm
Xmegaduino:
https://github.com/akafugu/Xmegaduino

I think this is the official spec for boards.txt?
https://github.com/arduino/Arduino/wiki/Arduino-IDE-1.5---3rd-party-Hardware-specification

And this tells me the processor name I need for AVRdude, and on page 2 indicates it supports DFU (FLIP v2 on the xmega):
http://nongnu.askapache.com//avrdude/avrdude-doc-6.1.pdf

But I'm pretty sure the xmega timers and stuff work differently than the mega ones, and I'm wondering if I just add a new board to boards.txt how the heck the code is going to know to use the special xmega versions of the SPI and DAC librariees for example?   Do you think their code looks for only those three variants they've defined?  Or does it go by processor?  And if so, does that mean I'm boned if my board doesn't use the same processor as one of the already defined variants?

I'm pulling my hair out here.  I gotta get this working with the Atxmega256A3BU on the explained board, and I need it to upload via USB using the DFU bootloader.  But I've got no idea what steps I need to take to get a new board profile working aside from editing that boards.txt file.
34  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: Are there any one-click tools that could be used to update firmware via usb? on: June 16, 2014, 11:33:49 am
Well, that's really rather funny, because the Mac OS is (now) a UNIX/ Linux variant where script files are how serious things have always been done!

My first computer had a tape drive.  I grew up on DOS.  I know how to write a batch file and work from a command line.  And I have no desire to return to the good old dayssmiley
35  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: Are there any one-click tools that could be used to update firmware via usb? on: June 16, 2014, 08:27:38 am
Yeah after the other fellow mentioned avrdude I thought to check for a gui for that, but the two I found have way too many options for an end user.   I don't want them to be able to change the fuse settings. 

Um... assuming the xmega even has fuses.  Which I think it doesn't.  Still... too confusing. 

Maybe something that loads an ELF file that would contain all those fuse settings?

If worst comes to worst, a batch file isn't horrible, but it does shut out all the Mac users.  I have no idea how to create something like a batch file on a Mac.

This really seems like something that should exist; I mean how many products has stuff based on the Arduino made it into, and there isn't an application you can send to an end user to load new firmware without handing them the source code and the IDE and telling them good luck?
36  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: Are there any one-click tools that could be used to update firmware via usb? on: June 16, 2014, 02:52:18 am
Yes, I mean like AVRDude, but like I said, I'd prefer not to use a batch file.  But I'd sooner use a batch file than have to write a windows application to display a file dialog and call it.  I haven't done anything like that in years and don't have the tools installed.

I'm also not sure how complicated installing AVRDude is. Unless I could just include the exe file in a zip along with the binary and batch file, it would be too complicated for my end users.

What I'd really like is to just have a single executable that pops up a file selector box and the user chooses a binary and hits upload.  I think the Teensy loader may feature something like this.  Atmel's FLIP utility is also close but I don't think it will work with the Xmegaduino bootloader I think I'm going to be stuck with if I want to just use the Arduino IDE. 
37  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Are there any one-click tools that could be used to update firmware via usb? on: June 15, 2014, 05:34:08 pm
Hey guys,

The Arduino micro and DUE both have a USB port for programming.  I am looking at designing a board with an Xmega using the Xmegaduino IDE which would also have USB. 

I need to be able to allow my end users to upload new firmware in a simple manner.  Right now, I've got a board with an Atmega1284 and I have them put a .bin file on an SD card and the board loads it from there.  I was thinking USB might be a better option, especially if I can make it so the board acts like a mass storage device normally so they can just drop files onto the SD card. 

So, what I was wondering is is there some utility out there which I could tell my end users to download which would allow them to simply plug the device in, select a file, and click a button to upload a binary to it?  I'd prefer not to have to do something with a batch file.
38  Community / Products and Services / Re: The Zero is upon us! on: May 21, 2014, 11:03:42 pm
Another video on the board has been posted by HackADay:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SxpscquBIo4

So, what I gather from this is:

- The debugger is primarily for use with Atmel Studio.  they made no mention of debugging in the Arduino IDE.

- The SWD pins on the right side (unpopulated by default) are for using the board as a debugger when developing your own projects using the SAMD21.  I assume it plugs into the JTAG pins on the target board.

- The SPI port is not used for programming.  Presumably it is pin-compatible with the ICSP port, since it is in the same location. 
39  Community / Products and Services / Re: The Zero is upon us! on: May 20, 2014, 12:50:05 am
It seems silly to go to so much trouble.  Why would I want to use STM's debugger chip with another vendor's hardware?  I'm sure I can buy a JTAG debugger from Atmel for a reasonable price.  And I'm guessing there are open solutions out there that will work with any Arm chip.  So why be difficult about it?  You don't need to lock me in with custom chips and encryption.  Atmel has locked me in with their excellent documentation, their excellent Atmel Studio, their inexpensive ISP programmer, and all the libraries available for the Arduino.
40  Community / Products and Services / Re: The Zero is upon us! on: May 19, 2014, 01:06:41 pm
I don't like the inclusion of a second chip for debugging which won't be available for use in our own designs

What are the details on this? Are you sure the second chip won't be generally available?

I'm pretty sure.  There was a whole thread about it on AvrFreaks.  I believe one to the Atmel representatives said it was custom silicon, and that even if you reverse engineered it it would do you no good because it won't be made available for purchase.

Quote
If so, will this be the first Arduino that can't be cloned?

Yes, in the sense that you can't make an exact clone of it which features the built-in debugger. 

You should however be able to create boards which are otherwise identical, and program them. 

But you may not be able to use whatever debugging environment they add to the Arduino IDE.  Then again, it may be possible to buy a JTAG debugger from Atmel and still interface that with the IDE as you would when debugging the Due in Atmel Studio.  The debug chip on this board may in fact be the same chip in their standalone debuggers, and since it's connected via the JTAG interface, one of their standalone debuggers connected to a board with a SAMD21 processor on it may just appear to the IDE as an Arduino ZERO.  Or not.  We don't know yet.
 
41  Community / Products and Services / Re: The Zero is upon us! on: May 18, 2014, 06:17:00 am
Atmel interviews Massimo Banzi about the ZERO:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6st9ym0a6Sk
42  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: Neopixels - Is it possible to do anything in the middle of an update? on: May 16, 2014, 09:38:13 pm
Ha, I just noticed all those articles on Neopixels were just posted over the last few days.  Lucky me. smiley
43  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: Neopixels - Is it possible to do anything in the middle of an update? on: May 16, 2014, 09:28:43 pm
Hm, it seems that page does have the answer:

Quote
Q: I have some interrupt timing sensitive code that I have always wanted to run while also driving NeoPixels. Are you saying this might be possible?
A: No problem! As long as you can keep your interrupt service shorter than ~5us, you can leave interrupts on almost all the time while driving your NeoPixels. The only place where you need to turn them off is during the very brief moment when sending a 0-bit pulse to make sure that it stays below the maximum T0H length. If you add the following code to protect the sending of the 0-bit in sendBit() …

I'm not certain that my audio interrupt is less than 5us, but I did calculate there's 45us between samples, so... maybe it will work?
44  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: Neopixels - Is it possible to do anything in the middle of an update? on: May 16, 2014, 09:17:16 pm
Hm, I found this interesting page:
http://wp.josh.com/2014/05/13/ws2812-neopixels-are-not-so-finicky-once-you-get-to-know-them/

I'm still reading through it, but it may hold the key...
45  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Neopixels - Is it possible to do anything in the middle of an update? on: May 16, 2014, 09:06:08 pm
I have a board where I'm playing audio at 22khz and I'd like to also update a short string of Neopixels (less than 10).  I've only got 45 microseconds between each sample, and I have to transmit 16 bits to my DAC every time, so I may not even have the 30 microseconds between each sample required to send one full pixel's worth of data.

I was looking at Adafruit's tutorial here:
https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-neopixel-uberguide/advanced-coding

And clearly, I can't hold the line low at any point for longer than 50us or the data will latch into the pixels. and the next bit of data I send will go to the first pixel. 

However, I'm wondering if perhaps I could hold the line high longer than usual, and what will happen if I do.   

For example, is the pixel keying off the length of the low signal after the high signal to decide if a bit is 0 or 1, or is it keying off the length of the high time, and the length of the low after that doesn't matter as long as it's not so long (50us) that it causes the pixel to latch the data?  Does it only decide what bit was sent after the low signal goes high again?  It seems like it would because otherwise it might load a new bit when the intention was to latch the pixel.  I guess I should look at the Arduino lib and see what they do at the end of the data transfer... either they take the signal high like the datasheet shows at the end, then go low for 50ms, or they'd just hold it low after the last bit was transmitted, which would probably mean the high time is how it decides what bit it was.

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