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256  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: Beginner question: building a parts "library" on: December 18, 2007, 01:22:25 pm
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Awesome.  I added a link to it on the playground: http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Main/Resources.  I hope people will continue to build on it.
would it be technically possible to allow the javascript embed of partlists in this YaBB installation?
how about flash from trusted servers (youtube) or is it disabled for the same [security?] reasons?

 

257  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: Beginner question: building a parts "library" on: December 18, 2007, 09:46:19 am
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One great way to collect this information (besides answers here or a page on the playground) might be a parts list on Octopart, which would allow people to buy the parts from a variety of distributors.  

i starte to explore the octopart.com option.

here's a quick public partslist:
http://octopart.com/partlist/view?id=NjEzNzMy

it seems you can't search for partlists on octopart. could someone of you try if it's possible to add items to that list and save it under a new name?

plus: i didn't add resistors just because i couldn't find any 1/4W through holes in that billion of SMT parts. how do you search for them?

as for manufacturers/models: i chose those parts first in the search result that had a pdf datasheet attached.
maybe we should discuss individual parts and do seperate lists for special ICs/caps/Leds etc. That way i would be easier to explain them in the partlist description (individual parts can't be commented i think).

//kuk

PS: it seems the octopart list can also be embedded in webpages using one line javascript. unfortunately YaBB doesn't like this :-(


EDIT: individual parts _can_ be commented. it also seems that anyone can create a personal copy of list and edit/publish it under his/her own name!
so if you know of components that are essential, somehow "general purpose" please put it in this thread with a short description and i put them on the list.


i


258  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: Can my Arduino be a clock? on: January 18, 2008, 11:01:41 am
this topic comes up from time to time. the extra realtime component is a save bet if you use it correctly. still an arduino should be enough to build an accurate clock. if you notice an offset (because of crystal tolerances) you should also be able to compensate for it in your code. as kg4wsv wrote, the actual frequency is dependant on the crystal but shouldn't change over time. me too says go ahead! and keep us informed. it's a shame that there's no arduino-only clock code out there yet.

ku
259  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: Where did Daniel go? on: January 18, 2008, 05:53:06 am
shouldn't it be daniel0002?

welcome back!  smiley
260  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: Where did Daniel go? on: January 10, 2008, 12:42:19 pm
hi jds,
i'm wondering as well, but didn't dare to tell that i'm missing a person on an internet forum :-)
i can imagine different reasons (for myself) to unsubscribe from a forum, so i think we'll just have to live with it. i just hope there were no hard feelings involved.

kuk
261  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: VU meter or Blink to music on: December 12, 2007, 04:04:42 pm
i found this pdf: http://manuals.info.apple.com/en/logic/Logic_Control_Surfaces_Info.pdf

it seems indeed logic is able to send meter levels as sysEx (non standard) midi messages. since sysEx messages don't have a fixed length (like 3 bytes for a "Note On") it might get a little tricky to get into this. i'd recommend trying the midi monitor that i mentioned. maybe all your info is in the pdf, i didn't really read it.



262  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: VU meter or Blink to music on: December 12, 2007, 03:16:00 pm
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i mean thru MIDI. I assume Logic pro or Cubase are able to send, as MIDI data, the Level meters they have on their mixers.

i'm not sure if they do, but if i would be interested to know. interpreting midi is no big deal, if you know the status byte of the "audio volume message". if you don't know, you can use an application like midi monitor (os x) to see what kind of messages are sent at all.
263  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: VU meter or Blink to music on: December 12, 2007, 02:18:03 pm
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is it possible to build something similar but "digital" for midi controller?
(thus, it can read the Level meters from Logic, cubase, etc..)

it depends on how you can make those apps send you your information. if it's midi no problem, but if we're talking about analog audio (from a headphones jack for example) you can try hooking it directly to some analog pin on your board plus ground to ground. note that the signal will between -1V and + 1V (i think) so you may need to amplify it to use the full range of the analog port (0-5V).
264  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: VU meter or Blink to music on: December 12, 2007, 09:04:18 am
you could start by getting sound/volume into your arduino. there's a how-to for microphone input here : http://tinkerlog.com/2007/05/20/cheap-sound-sensor-for-avr/

265  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: I'm starting to worry... on: November 27, 2007, 04:40:19 pm
i think all arduinos traditionally come with a ~220? build-in resistor on pin 13. if you connect a LED to it you can take it as a debugging help in your program.
this will also show if your atmega is still alive because the bootloader blinks pin 13 on reset.

266  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: I'm starting to worry... on: November 27, 2007, 02:22:36 pm
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Thank you all, but I do in fact know how electricity works.  I also know that a motor reversed is a generator, but what I don't understand is how putting electricity into a microchip will break it.  For one, isn't it designed to take in electricity for input?  And for another, how does electricity break an electrical device?

electricity is not electricity. there are 100.000 Volt sources that will kill you by getting to near and others you can carry in your pocket without knowing. That's why we came up with the water example.

Electrical current in a wire produces heat. And too much heat may eventually burn something in your "electrical device".

Did you test your board with an LED hooked to pin13 and ground?


267  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: I'm starting to worry... on: November 27, 2007, 05:01:58 am
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Think of electricity as water.
Voltage is the speed of the water and current is the amount of water.

@cheater:
Wouldn't speed here mean the same as amount of water? something like 2liters/second?
It helped me much though to think of voltage as water pressure.
//kuk
268  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: I'm starting to worry... on: November 26, 2007, 11:44:41 am
and yes, your motor might have killed the atmega because of reverse voltage or other high loads if you turned the motor for example (thus using it as a generator). try connecting an led instead of the motor, to check if the pin still works. you might be lucky because pin 13 has an additional resistor which limits the current.

269  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: Upgrading old Arduino boards ? on: October 06, 2007, 07:20:08 am
yes you can. i did just replace the atmega8 with a 168 (that had the bootloader preburned though)...
set the right microcontroller target in the arduino software (168 instead of smiley-cool and there you go.
270  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: Arduino Mini Vs. Pre-Loaded ATmega168 on: September 22, 2007, 05:33:29 am
see http://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/StandaloneAssembly for the schematics. the parts on the left side is for the serial connection, which you won't need having the mini usb adapter.
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