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706  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: HTML, Ajax, JavaScript... question on: June 01, 2009, 08:20:21 am
I think the closet you'll get is a javascript cookie but that'll only write to a client side file.

A flat file hosted on the server will need a server side language to read and write, like php.

Ajax uses php or asp for server side functions as well, so I don't think there's an Ajax solution either.  

Edit:

As above
707  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: Forum Etiquette on: May 22, 2009, 08:55:58 pm
Personal attacks happen here a lot less than other communities, like sitepoint for example .. you need to know your stuff there or else people are quick to point out you don't.

If there's enough people here being polite, and there are, then hopefully its an example others will follow.

This is a place of creativity and there are many different types of people here with different opinions. So long as a majority are respecting the views and opinions of others, which I believe they do, then the occasional "scuffle" is to be expected and isn't really a big deal, so long as people behave like adults and don't take things too personally.

I'm in awe of some of the talent here to be honest, and having seen so much of it since I've been here I know others in time will discover the same and realize its a privilege to be in the company of some truly nice, skilled, and incredibly talented individuals.

Maybe this site needs a proper logo with a TAG line that reflects the spirit of the community. The Yabb 2.2.3 logo is an eyesore, perhaps it brings out the worst in people.
  

708  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: Forum Etiquette on: May 22, 2009, 04:03:39 am
I didn't realize the "ticks" had functionality. See, 500 and something posts and still learning = )

I'd still prefer to view a BIG list of unread posts via one page.

O/T: can your ethernet shield be connected to a 3G dongle, perhaps using something like a USB to Ethernet Adapter?

709  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: Forum Etiquette on: May 22, 2009, 03:13:35 am
btw. It's easy to go into Yabbs admin control panel and change the names assigned to levels, like "God Member" could be easily renamed "novice with lots of posts".. etc etc
710  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: Forum Etiquette on: May 22, 2009, 03:11:37 am
@follower

Yes, now that you point that out I hadn't noticed the cute little flags before. But only if I click on each board, like "Development" for example.

So, unless there's something else I'm missing. I'd click on each of the 14 boards to look for flags? Or can it somehow do what SMF does, and display all new posts since your last visit .. rather than the default 10 Yabb offers, or 25 "max" if you type the number in yourself, as flags or otherwise?
 



711  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: Forum Etiquette on: May 21, 2009, 03:27:21 am
@pakrat

For what its worth, anyone thats taken from Arduino .. like me, tries to "put back in" when the opportunity arises. At least, thats what I've observed in my time here.

After you've been here for a while and found your way around the Arduino-jargon, it becomes easier finding answers yourself using the search, provided you know to use the "home page google search", not the forum search.

When I was new, I had trouble knowing "how" to ask the right question without sounding stupid due to my greenness. But the only reason I asked "sometimes", is because I didn't know what to search for, and at the time, the google search hadn't been implemented.

Most people that have been here a while and have something to contribute, will help others time and opportunity permitting. Otherwise, some people swing by for a quick look, help if its possible, then get back to their "real-world" activities. Unfortunately, in between visits, its easy to miss a few hundred posts - because the forum software isn't able to tell a member which posts they haven't viewed yet.

As mentioned by Nachtwind, I also think a very large number of issues would be resolved by upgrading to SMF. Unfortunately there are issues migrating from flat-file Yabb, to mySql SMF, but hopefully an upgrade is a matter of when, rather than "if".

SMF hosts a variety of options that are compatible with many of the suggestions made in this thread, but I'm not sure if this thread is being read by those who are in control of the Yabb software, or even if they've considered an upgrade would be of benefit to the community.

So it might be nice to hear the thoughts of Arduino's present moderators, and if this discussion has the potential to bring about much needed change.
712  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: Forum Etiquette on: May 14, 2009, 05:15:04 am
Yabb can't be easily migrated to SMF because Yabb uses flat files, and SMF uses mySql. There are scripts available for doing the job but they all have one kind of issue or another, like dropped posts and member details and member history crossovers .. very messy, and for a community this size .. perhaps "too" risky.

The homepage search uses google which provides excellent results, so in my opinion, the most efficient solution would be to implement google search in the forum software rather than the default Yabb search. That's a 1 hour forum hack to implement, and then new members won't have as many problems finding answers.



  

 

713  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: Arduino on Systm on: May 11, 2009, 03:11:21 am
Few would think basic is better than c++, except perhaps those who don't know c++

Haven't watched the episode yet and I'm guessing this statement "If you simply must go the open source route you can check out the Arduino board." is an indication they might be a little biased?
714  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: My first post on: December 01, 2008, 10:53:56 pm
@dave82

If your senior project includes Arduino, then here is the largest of only a few online resources.
715  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Bar Sport / Re: How do you get financial support. on: January 21, 2008, 08:10:18 pm
Quote
Wonderful thoughts....just to clear any questions, I am not currently going through any of the scenarios depicted and I'm just asking questions for reference purposes. I have a new question now:

How do you get various financial support from the private, commercial, or governmental sector, to support your product, service, or invention?  


First and foremost, the invention should solve a problem, make a process more efficient, or, appeal to a need. You build a prototype, then approach the people who'll likely be customers. Once you have someone that's interested in buying it, then you can approach various institutions to obtain funding for production and deployment.

Talking to others about your invention, is essential in determining it's viability. Patent law permits a window for such a process to occur, mainly because the office is full of worthless patents that weren't researched properly to begin with. So don't be too worried about someone else stealing it and trying to beat you to the patent office, unless it's something of obvious high intellectual property value potential, like a new packaging system for storing milk that can be summed up in one simple diagram. You can file a provisional patent, and that will provide 18 months with which to create a final specification for a full patent application. Such instrument ensures your idea is franked, and gives you time to discuss the concept, pitch it to potential client's, and find investors.  

Millions of people each year, invent things or change something, that they think will win them a Nobel, so the grounds are very well trodden, meaning, you can learn from the success or failure of others throughout history. Such case studies make compelling reading, and can illuminate a path to the most obvious sources of funding, most of the time, a majority of it will need to be your own money. The people who are most likely to be in a position to offer additional funding, will likely host many such requests each day. How you win favor over all the others, is by demonstrating to the investor how fast they will make a return on their money, and that requires a comprehensive business, marketing, production and financial plan.

Many business plans are all about what a great idea it is, but investors will be looking for a quick return (put yourself in their shoes - wouldn't you?) so focus on that. Lots of ideas get shown the door because someone knows a business already doing it. Positioning yourself against competitors demonstrates that you understand your market, so you need to be thorough in your discovery of others inventions that might be similar to your own, you wouldn't want to suffer the embarrasement of someone less specialized than yourself, pointing out your invention has already been done by someone else.  

Investors will also grade you on your ability to concisely explain the invention, their investment decision will be partly based on the concept, the other part, your ability to generate a profit from selling the invention. Investors also have a very short attention span, so having the discipline and skill to summarize your invention to a 2-4 page proposal gives the investor an ability to understand the concept quickly, and it speaks volumes about the type of person you are, and why they might have the confidence to trust you with their money.

Government funding might have a more relaxed set of criteria over private, but they'll still insist on some kind of feasibility study. If one hasn't already been done, then the first part of the funding, will be to pay to have one done. Where other people's money is involved, there's no escaping reality, and a feasibility study will demonstrate to others that the idea isn't fanciful and can turn a profit. I know this from experience, because from the day I stepped out of school, I have, and have had, patents, and private funding, and Government funding, and I have made money from invention. The thing to remember, is that there is always someone smarter than you, no matter how clever you are, so understanding potential customers, markets, competitors, manufacturing, and business in a wider sense, is all critical to the success of any invention. It only takes one person to know more about the habits of the client's you might be proposing to sell to, to unwind a proposal. So in that regard, you need to be a jack of all trades, it's all part of being an executive, and not just another inventor looking for handouts.

Be prepared to invest a considerable amount of your own money into the invention. Investors expect it, it demonstrates that your willing to risk your own money, as well as theirs smiley
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