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1  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Arduino, 5V relay, 220v: checking I'm not putting myself or others at risks on: September 01, 2014, 08:17:06 am
Yes, after a (very) quick search on google and the arduino forum, it seems to be the case. Shame as they look pretty neat.

My second option was to use remote plugs, I've used them with arduinos before. It's quick and probably safer!
2  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Arduino, 5V relay, 220v: checking I'm not putting myself or others at risks on: September 01, 2014, 08:06:56 am
I can't recall, nor can I be arsed to look, if you said you're in a 110 or 220 VAC part of the world. If 110, get a https://www.adafruit.com/products/268 ... I don't think they come in 220.

Ha, that looks great. Might be a good alternative if I can find one for the UK.
Is that not just using the same type of relay module inside?
3  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Arduino, 5V relay, 220v: checking I'm not putting myself or others at risks on: September 01, 2014, 08:01:27 am


Quote
Think of the coil side as the low voltage side and the contacts side as a snake that will bite you.
keep them separate and Bob's your uncle !

I'm not really sure I understand this. the Coil is inside the relay, I would think that it not possible for me to access it?

here is a sketch.  the coil wires come out of the case. these are your low voltage bits to use.

the contacts are separated from the coil by an air gap.   your only connections are on the case of the relay.

Oh I see! On that Relay board I think it should be fine, as long as I don't make them touch.
4  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Arduino, 5V relay, 220v: checking I'm not putting myself or others at risks on: September 01, 2014, 07:45:23 am
Subject:

Quote
Arduino, 5V relay, 220v: checking I'm not putting myself or others at risks

If you have to ask, you are.

Great input mate

simple logic dictates that if you have to ask, you do no know.
if you do not know, then you are experimenting.
if you are experimenting with something that could kill your or others...

I would offer that using low voltage devices like 12 volt lights and batteries would allow one to gain experience without risk.

finally, most of us know someone who knows about wiring in a house.  ask for help and a visit for their inspection.



True, but taking the time to actually explain why it could kill you can potential stop people from doing it. Little narky comments never stopped inexperience people, on the contrary I would say. I guess that's the difference between people having knowledge and people being able to share their knowledge. Anyways, that comment isn't really important.

Unfortunately I don't know an electrician, I'm also going to look into safer solutions but I think I will give it a go, at least to try it, even if I don't keep that module in my project. I'm sure other people will buy that relay module, and maybe reading that thread will help.

Thanks a lot for all the help. It's nice to learn more about how things work.

5  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Arduino, 5V relay, 220v: checking I'm not putting myself or others at risks on: September 01, 2014, 07:26:01 am
Thanks a lot Dave for taking the time to explain! That's great smiley

If I understood well, you are saying that the relay is isolated and safe, the bit that is risky is actually wiring the Live cable properly.

Quote
Think of the coil side as the low voltage side and the contacts side as a snake that will bite you.
keep them separate and Bob's your uncle !

I'm not really sure I understand this. the Coil is inside the relay, I would think that it not possible for me to access it?

Quote
if you have to take the lift to you flat, make sure you have a torch   and access to the stairs in case you trip a circuit breaker.  
Love that smiley

ps: Thank you all for taking the time to answer my questions.
6  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Arduino, 5V relay, 220v: checking I'm not putting myself or others at risks on: September 01, 2014, 07:03:11 am
Subject:

Quote
Arduino, 5V relay, 220v: checking I'm not putting myself or others at risks

If you have to ask, you are.

Great input mate
7  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Arduino, 5V relay, 220v: checking I'm not putting myself or others at risks on: September 01, 2014, 06:58:07 am
I'm looking at the datasheet for the relay (http://www.parallax.com/sites/default/files/downloads/27115-Single-Relay-Board-Datasheet.pdf).  The cycles seems to be 107 for mechanical use and 105 for electrical.

So that's 10 000 000 mechanical and 100 000 electrical. Not sure how to relate to this but 10 000 000 mechanical movements is roughly 27 000 times a day for 365 days. For electrical it would be 273 times a day for 365 days. I know it's not future proof but hey ho, just wanted to mention it, if you do a project that isn't made to last (e.g: short exhibition), that sound pretty good.

I'm also surprised there's not a security system inside that module in case you reach that limit.
8  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Arduino, 5V relay, 220v: checking I'm not putting myself or others at risks on: September 01, 2014, 06:38:49 am
Great fun !  But since your only using 220vac you should be ok...LOL

Haha, ok I get it. Metal box it is then. I still need to put that metal case inside a big wooden box. I probably need to look into that to now.

For the Solid State Relay I meant that at the moment I have the 2 channels 5V relay module, that thing has all the transistor, resistors, etc.. build in. If I use a Solid State Relay I'm guessing it's not just a matter of wiring it straight in with my arduino and light. I will do some researches on that.

9  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Arduino, 5V relay, 220v: checking I'm not putting myself or others at risks on: September 01, 2014, 04:58:12 am
In UK-topia they do call it "Live", that's their term.

Haha, I though so smiley


For the solid state, I'm guessing I'm going to need to find a module as I rather have something ready-made on this one.

Also, you were talking about casing the arduino, if it's sitting in a wooden box that should be ok?
10  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Arduino, 5V relay, 220v: checking I'm not putting myself or others at risks on: August 31, 2014, 05:20:12 pm
Thank you so much for the quick replies!

So if I understood well, it is safe as long as I wire this properly. The arc effect is also safe, but the relay will stop working after x amount of times switching the lamp off. What would happen when the relay reach it's maximum number of cycles? Would it just stop working? Is it still safe?

For the wires, 'line' coming from the wall socket goes to COM and the 'line' coming from the lamp goes to NO. Gnd and Neutral stay wired to the lamp as normal.

Is the advantage of a Solid State Relay just to not have the arc and therefor have a relay that will last longer?

Cheers
11  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Arduino, 5V relay, 220v: checking I'm not putting myself or others at risks on: August 31, 2014, 02:51:57 pm
Hi,

I would like to try to turn on a light plugged to the main using a 2 channels 5v relay (SRD-05VDC-SL-C). This very useful video on the relay module explains it well but I'm still a bit scared as I never worked with Main and would like not to die or burn the house down if possible.

On the trigger side, I seem to be able to use the arduino 5V and a pin to trigger the switch of the relay (apparently it needs no more than 20ma).

On the other side, I'm not sure how a light bulb would be wired onto the relay module. It's not just Gnd and live; it's Live, Neutral and Gnd.

Would it be Live<-->NO,  Neutral and Ground<-->COM?

Any advices would be much appreciated,
Cheers

-------------------------------------------------------------------
Sources
Youtube video: http://youtu.be/b6ZagKRnRdM?t=5m53s
Relay Module: http://www.amazon.co.uk/2-Channel-Module-Shield-Arduino-Electronic/dp/B009P04ZKC
12  Products / Arduino Yún / Re: Arduino Yun - How to close http client connections? on: May 18, 2014, 01:59:47 pm
cheers smiley
13  Products / Arduino Yún / Re: Arduino Yun - How to close http client connections? on: May 18, 2014, 11:29:41 am
Hi Federico,

I get a:
Code:
Arduino: 1.5.6-r2 (Mac OS X), Board: "Arduino Yún"
error: 'class HttpClient' has no member named 'stop'

Do you know if that have been removed? I can still see it in the documentation. My sketches run without it so I always assumed in was somehow integrated inside the HttpClient.
14  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Interfacing with a 3G USB Modem on: May 15, 2014, 11:21:37 am
Whouah that's was so dry PaulS.   smiley-eek-blue
15  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: The easiest/best way to drive a Numitron (IV-9) with an Arduino Uno on: May 11, 2014, 09:02:35 am
Victorian? Late Edwardian, perhaps!

As "if Victorian did do electronics", not as "historically accurate Victorian". Numitrons seems to be from the 70s anyway

Fair enough for the diagram, it would have made more sense.
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