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1  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Help !!! Smart GPU Questions on: February 06, 2012, 09:31:35 pm
I sent the address as a private message
2  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Help !!! Smart GPU Questions on: February 06, 2012, 09:26:42 pm
Uploading it to another website for you. Should take a minute

EDIT: ...or two as the site says
3  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Increasing the coverage size of an LDR on: February 05, 2012, 11:29:59 pm
I feel stupid now, I tried with some cheap lens (magnifiers from the dollar store) and it turns out it works perfectly. I knew something was wrong.
4  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Increasing the coverage size of an LDR on: February 02, 2012, 08:44:51 pm
Anybody?
5  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Increasing the coverage size of an LDR on: February 01, 2012, 08:34:10 pm
That's what I thought, but I tried and it didn't work (laser entering the lens at a right angle). Very strange, maybe I wasn't holding my indicator at the focal point (LDR should be at focal point right?). I'll try another time when I get some lenses, but for the moment I'm stuck. Also if I can find a cheaper way then lenses, i'd like it.

BTW, does anyone know where to buy cheap lenses with small focal length?
6  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Increasing the coverage size of an LDR on: February 01, 2012, 08:25:15 pm
I'm trying to build some kind of laser detector, to know if the laser as been obstructed. I know it can easily be done by pointing the laser beam directly at the LDR.
The laser module has to be separated from the LDR module (in this case by about 3 meters or 10 feet).
Each modules will be made in wood.

The problem is that my LDR is 3mm in diameter and I don't want to fine tune it's position every time I move my device.

Is there a way to increase the size of my LDR coverage, say, to about ½ inch or more? (Already tried biconvex lens, but it won't work efficiently with lasers apparently)

Thank you.
7  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Arduino Controlled NES? on: June 15, 2011, 07:36:06 pm
Hi,

I'm very new to the Arduino and to electronics in general. I've seen a lot of people using NES controllers on their Arduino to control lights, motors and stuff. I would easily be able to do that with a library (I've done it with a PS1 controller), but I'd like to do the opposite.

My question is: Is it possible to make an NES controller out of an Arduino and to plug it safely into my NES?

I've got an idea of how it could work, but it would require some trial and error and i'm not sure how safe it is, I don't want to break my console.

Thanks in advance
8  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Troubleshooting / Re: 5v Power turns off (or shorts out) Arduino on: August 06, 2010, 12:36:25 am
So could I use an external power source with a transistor(connected to the arduino) as a switch?
9  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Troubleshooting / Re: 5v Power turns off (or shorts out) Arduino on: August 04, 2010, 04:45:33 pm
Sorry, I didn't quite understand. I'm trying to connect a 5v motor to an Arduino and I'd like to use a digital pin as a switch (with a transistor).

I'd connect the ground(with a resistor), the digital pin and the motor to the transistor and the motor to the 5v.

Can I do that?

(I know... I'm a noob)
10  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Troubleshooting / Re: Serial LED control problem on: July 17, 2010, 05:50:52 pm
Quote
Today, you remember that '0' = 48. But, 2 months from now, will you remember why toy are subtracting 48 from the value? Subtracting '0' results in the same value being subtracted, but, makes it much more obvious what is being subtracted and makes it more likely that you will remember why.
True, I agree. But I knew about ASCII before, I just didn't though about it. Now I know that serial sends ASCII value, that's all I needed. Thanks a lot everybody. It's been really helpful.
11  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Troubleshooting / Re: Serial LED control problem on: July 16, 2010, 09:39:39 pm
I know 0=48 so x-48 (x being an ASCII value) = Decimal value. That's obvious

Quote
its limited by the fact that if you get near or over 40ma its going to die, there is no protection on any pin of the arduino, where ever you got that quote from is wrong
It's from http://arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/Dimmer
But I understand that it will slowly damage my arduino so i'll use some (when I got some)
12  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Troubleshooting / Re: Serial LED control problem on: July 16, 2010, 02:16:07 pm
Quote
Then you are destroying your arduino.

http://www.thebox.myzen.co.uk/Tutorial/LEDs.html

Quote
An LED connected to pin 9. use appropriate resistor as needed. For most common LEDs, you can usually do without the resistor, as the current output of the digital I/O pins is limited.

From: http://arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/Dimmer

Anyway I'll buy some resistor but for the moment i'm not using them.

Can I reconvert ASCII values to numbers? Or send decimals from another program (like VB.NET)?
13  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Troubleshooting / Serial LED control problem on: July 15, 2010, 07:18:15 pm
I want to control a leds intensity with analogWrite(10, variable) over serial. Here's my code (Slightly modified from the "Dimmer" exemple):

Code:
const int ledPin = 10;
  byte brightness; //Is it ok if I use int instead of byte?

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(9600);
  pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);
}

void loop() {
  if (Serial.available()) {

    brightness = Serial.read();

    analogWrite(ledPin, 0);

    analogWrite(ledPin, brightness);

    Serial.println(brightness); // This is for testing
  }
}

The problem is that the led as a constant brightness, even if I send "0" over serial.

Thanks in advance !

P.S. I'm not using any resistor. I've tried to make it dim by itself (see "Fading" exemple) and it worked perfectly. And yes i'm using a PWM pin. I'm using an Arduino Duemilanove
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