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1  Community / Products and Services / Re: PrismaChron Color Clock on: November 11, 2013, 03:12:48 pm
It's 24 hour based. Made for a broader color range.
We've actually thought about making a "Monochrome PrismaChron" at some point. Just 3 regular LEDs and varying intensity. We could do something similar with the RGB leds though smiley
2  Community / Products and Services / PrismaChron Color Clock on: November 11, 2013, 11:23:41 am
Myself and the other fine gents at Maniacal Labs just finished a new, Arduino compatible, clock kit called the PrismaChron. The display consists of three RGB LEDs, one each for seconds, minutes and hours. As each value progresses through time, its LED slowly fades through the spectrum from red to violet, and everywhere in between. It's easy to build, has a built in RTC for accurate time, and has both FTDI and ICSP headers for easy upload of new/modified firmware. We're trying our hand at community funding and have started a fundraiser over on Tindie: https://www.tindie.com/products/ManiacalLabs/prismachron-clock/

We’d love to hear what you think!

-Adam Haile - Chief Software Geek
3  Community / Products and Services / Binary Epoch Clock Kit on: August 16, 2013, 01:58:55 pm
Started a little company with two friends and we just released our first Arduino-based clock kit. It shows the time as the 32-bit Unix Epoch value. So, yes, more of a novelty item for your favorite computer geek, time nut, etc. It's super easy to build and completely open source. Tell us what you think!

http://maniacallabs.com/product/becv1/
4  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: RTC (DS1307 or other) with millisecond resolution on: February 25, 2011, 04:40:12 pm
why not use an 5 hour scale for 12 hours ??????

5 hours day, 5 hours night ??

Well, that's how it's supposed to work... but what I meant was that they were taking a standard analog 12-hour clock where one rotation of the hour hand is always 12 hours and slapping a face on it that only shows 10 hours.  But since they didn't changing the timekeeping of the clock it self, it still takes 12 real hours to traverse their version of 10 metric hours.  You are absolutely right of how it's really done, my point was that those are a mere novelty and not correctly representative of metric time.
5  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: RTC (DS1307 or other) with millisecond resolution on: February 25, 2011, 04:12:59 pm
As said its a workaround if you want a workaround. Another option is to use the Ethernetshield and get connected to an internet time server (S)NTP. If you know the average roundtrip time you can get (I guess) approx 10 msec accuracy. You just need an NTP server near you with the shortest turnaround time

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Could you tell more about your metric clock concept?
How many hours per day, minutes per hour? seconds per minute? metric assumes multiple factor 10 => 100.000 seconds a day?



Hmmm... good thought, but that would definitely add a lot of cost and complexity. Will keep it in mind though.

As for the metric clock, it's actually a concept that's been around for a while (late 1700s actually).
I've always understood the concept to be as follows:
10 hours per day (full standard 24 hour period)
100 minutes per hour
100 seconds per minute
therefore,
10,000 seconds per hour
1,000 minutes per day.

Now, you obviously can't just cram 100 seconds in a minute without redefining the timespan of 1 second. So, under metric time, are the following conversions:
1 metric second = 0.864 seconds
1 metric minute = 1.44 minutes
1 metric hour = 2.4 hours

Which is how you can span 10 metric hours over the course of a 24 hour day.

Originally, when the metric measurement system was adopted, many people tried to get the world to switch to metric time, but it just didn't stick.
You will still see references to it though... mainly in Sci-Fi.  My favorite is in the 1927 film "Metropolis", where all the clocks show only 10 hours... I guess the point was that it was the future and they were more advanced, so they had adopted the metric system for everything.

I would definitely not be the first person to create a metric clock, however.  I actually got the idea from a metric watch made by Swatch that I came across years ago.  I mostly just want to do it for the hell of it... and because, while they exist, metric clocks are very hard to find. Or at least true metric clocks... you can often find analog clocks with the face replaced to only show 10 hours... but the clock hands still move based on the 12 hour analog system, so it merely crams 12 hours into a 10 hour scale.
6  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: RTC (DS1307 or other) with millisecond resolution on: February 25, 2011, 03:32:11 pm
Wouldn't that run into the issue of the inaccuracy of the ATMega timer? And the rollover?
Maybe at each 1 second rollover from the RTC, I could readjust the offset, just seems like a kludge to me...
7  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / RTC (DS1307 or other) with millisecond resolution on: February 25, 2011, 02:12:07 pm
I'm trying to build a clock that can show milliseconds and keep time accurately in general (also thinking about making a "metric" clock in the future... in which one second would be .864 real seconds, so I would need to see the millis) but, while I know I can use the millis() function, I cannot find any RTC circuit that actually returns milliseconds.

Does anything like this actually exist?
8  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: MAX7219 Alternative for 4 Digit 7-Segment display. on: February 14, 2011, 12:58:24 pm
Ok, that's what I was afraid of. I'd seen other ways of doing it, but didn't want to have to continuously drive the displays. MAX7219 it is.
9  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / MAX7219 Alternative for 4 Digit 7-Segment display. on: February 14, 2011, 12:43:37 pm
I'm trying to figure out the best way to drive a 4-Digit, 7-Segment display and have found the MAX7219 chip to be very popular, but it is somewhat expensive and I'm wondering if there is something that would be smaller and cheaper, but able to run 4 digits of a 7-Segment display, instead of the full 8.  Is there anything out there that would do that?

Another possibility, however, would be something that could drive the 4 digits plus 3 RGB LEDs with PWM.  I know the MAX7219 has enough channels to drive all those LEDs, but it would be without PWM, which I absolutely need to have for the RGBs.  I'm already planning on using a TLC5940 for those, but having a single chip solution would be great.

Any ideas?
10  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: Receiving Growl Messages on: September 07, 2010, 02:38:49 pm
They are related and the teams collaborate, but they are developed by separate teams... and, more importantly, the two implementations are actually not compatible.  So no Mac to PC Growl smiley-sad

The Mac version is apparently a little more ad hoc, while the Windows guys did up a full protocol and spec (GNTP). Though I have no idea why the Mac team has yet to actually implement that spec in their client... apparently it's coming in v1.3 (they are on v1.2.1 now).
11  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: Receiving Growl Messages on: September 07, 2010, 10:15:19 am
Sorry, should've been more clear.
Specifically, I'm actually talking about GNTP which is the Growl protocol for Windows: http://www.growlforwindows.com/gfw/help/gntp.aspx
As far as I know, Macs don't support it yet... but I'm using Windows, so GNTP is really what I need.
12  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Receiving Growl Messages on: September 07, 2010, 07:46:43 am
Is there any library out there that would allow receiving growl messages over the ethernet shield?
Or at least a good place to start in maybe creating one?
13  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Development / Re: Keeping all libraries in the sketch directory on: January 16, 2011, 09:02:08 am
I tried both. Though, the file was in a subdirectory of the main sketch directory.  Are subdirectories supported at all?
14  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Development / Re: Keeping all libraries in the sketch directory on: January 16, 2011, 08:28:05 am
Evidence is that is says it cannot find the file...
However, I had all the libraries in their own sub-directories as well. Will this not work?

I'm used to in win32 C++ I can just include it as "#include "mylib/mylib.h" and it will follow to the subdirectory just fine. I guess it's just this that is not supported.  

For organization's sake I would really like to have the subdirectories if there is any way to keep them.
15  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Development / Keeping all libraries in the sketch directory on: January 16, 2011, 08:00:20 am
I know that you are supposed to place any external libraries under the "libraries" folder of the arduino install directory, but I have a project that uses several libraries that I have created for the project and mainly to keep all that code self contained and out of the main pde file.  However, I have tried to place the libraries in the same directory as the main PDE file so that I can more easily keep everything synced up in subversion (I work on this on multiple computers) and I don't want to have to keep going back and syncing up the libraries separately.  Also, just for the sake of being able to easily zip of the sketch folder and know that it contains everything it needs.

I've tried adding the header files to the sketch as a new tab, but that doesn't seem to work at all... don't even care if they should up in the arduino IDE.

Is this possible? And, if so, how to I include them in the main file for building?
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