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121  Community / Bar Sport / Re: DorkbotPDX - Customs on: February 10, 2011, 09:23:30 pm
I just ordered two boards from Laen, and they came through the UK customs fine. Good quality boards, good turnaround too - about a week from shipment from the US, so not too bad in all.
122  Using Arduino / Displays / Re: Display on miniLCD and Go on: February 08, 2011, 04:22:16 am
There are also eInk displays becoming available - set them and then they stay that way until told otherwise (as I understand it). They are a bit rudimentary at the moment, but that might be a way forward.

http://proto-pic.co.uk/products/E%252dPaper-10x2-Character-Display.html
123  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: turnigy brushless motor speed controller on: September 19, 2010, 07:39:15 pm
Just for future readers benefit, I wrote a blog post a little while ago with some code that worked for me when I tried to control a brushless motor via an ESC.

Like Mouse I used a potentiometer and the serial port to see which values worked best for the devices I was using.
124  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: How do I Interface arduino with these guys?!?!? on: September 15, 2010, 04:51:32 am
Super, glad you got it working!
125  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: How do I Interface arduino with these guys?!?!? on: September 14, 2010, 10:39:51 am
I would try replacing the 'H' in the shiftOut function call with 0x08, 'E' with 0x05 etc.

My reasoning behind this is that it is my understanding that 'H' returns an ASCII code, which is different to the code assigned to H on your screen.

I'm new to all this however, so I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong!
126  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: How do I Interface arduino with these guys?!?!? on: September 14, 2010, 06:34:03 am
Is the display actually turning on?

Maybe try sending the char values from the datasheet as hex? 0x08, 0x05, 0x0C, 0x0C, 0x0F?
127  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: How do I Interface arduino with these guys?!?!? on: September 14, 2010, 05:44:12 am
This compiles for me -

Code:
...
shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, 'H');
...

But you'll need to check it on your board. Note the change from the double quotes to single quotes, and the inclusion of LSBFIRST. Also, you have an extraneous } at the end, but that's easy to fix.

Let us know if it works!
128  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: Arduino Laser Scanner? on: September 13, 2010, 08:15:56 pm
Similarly I don't have any experience with this, but I would probably start with some kind of laser range finder (Let's Make Robots has a post about it - http://letsmakerobots.com/node/2651 - dunno how useful it is) then go from there, maybe with a motor controlled slow moving turntable made from a lazy susan or something. The rangefinder could move up and down, slowly working its way up the item you are scanning.
129  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: NAND Logic Gate ICs & Arduino on: September 13, 2010, 11:45:11 am
Richard -

That seems to make sense. With regards to LED resistor value, I used the formula

 (VS - VL) / I

Where VS (3.3) is the supply voltage, VL (3.3) is the LED voltage and I (20mA) is the max current for the LED. (http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/components/led.htm)

With the LED I'm using it doesn't appear to need one (presuming I've done this right) when used with this supply, but I suppose it's a good idea to have one, just to protect it anyway? It reduces the brightness a bit as well so it's easier to have it sitting on the desk blinking away!



pwillard -

I'll have a think about you've said and try and get it working!

Got it going into the board effectively.

Thanks again.
130  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: NAND Logic Gate ICs & Arduino on: September 13, 2010, 11:04:43 am
Thanks Richard, that helps a lot!
131  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / Re: NAND Logic Gate ICs & Arduino on: September 13, 2010, 10:50:22 am
Here's the circuit diagram, because it wouldn't let me post it in my first post -

132  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Interfacing / NAND Logic Gate ICs & Arduino on: September 13, 2010, 10:49:52 am
Hi all,

I've just started playing with Arduino, which is great, but my lack of experience/knowledge is starting to show. I recently picked up a few NAND ICs, namely 74HC03N from TI, and I'm attempting to make it work with the Arduino.

In this case, two NAND gates have been strung together to form an AND gate, which returns true if both inputs are positive. An LED is being used to display the output, and in this diagram the switches are being used to represent the digital pins on the Arduino.

It works, the LED lights when the two pins are HIGH, but what I am wondering is if this is the right way to do this with these gates, and secondarily, is it notated correctly in the diagram?

The gates are apparently 'open-drain' which I understand to mean it needs a pull-up resistor (that's what the data sheet is telling me anyway) to provide the output 'signal'.

Presumably the two 22k resistors (I inserted these while trying to work out why it wouldn't work, without these the LED just sits there and flickers if the pins are not HIGH) are there so that the gate inputs are always connected to GND not just 0v, but when the digital pins are HIGH the current can't be bothered to trudge through the resistor and most of it goes through the gate instead?

Apologies if these are stupid questions, or if this is not the right place to ask them, I'm off to the book store tomorrow to pick up a few books I think!

Thanks,

Aidan
133  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Exhibition / Re: Three Sisters - Wood Turnings + Arduinos = ? on: September 14, 2010, 08:33:20 am
A very verbose writeup!

I like the idea of making, as you say, 'static' wooden items into more interactive ones - especially the fact they sense a shadow falling over them. Are you using a whole board or a simplified version?
134  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Uno Punto Zero / Re: More c# & VB.net source code, together with scetch on: September 28, 2010, 11:19:34 am
Perhaps you could work it this way - between 0 and 360 controls pan, and 400-760 controls tilt. If you send the arduino, for example, 300, it will move the pan servo to position 300, and if you send the arduino 696 it would move the tilt servo to position 296.

That shouldn't be too hard to modify on the existing source, although it would be a bit obtuse to someone not aware of what was going on when looking back, if it wasn't documented well.

Alternatively send a character before each integer string and parse that before you decide what you want to do with the number you receive after it. So P132 would move the pan to 132, and T132 would change the tilt the same amount. A bit more complicated to implement in the C# source code, but by no means difficult.
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