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1  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: What needs to be done for using Atmega328 internal oscillator or 8Mhz crystal? on: April 02, 2013, 06:53:08 am
This can be set up via fuses.

http://www.engbedded.com/fusecalc/
2  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Compile error I can't identify, unidentified element. PS2You display on: March 29, 2013, 09:37:04 am
I downloaded FJAGMHTGXDWPLJ8.zip from the instructables site. There is /MatrixDisplay/font.h file with this declaration:

unsigned char PROGMEM myfont[92][5] = { ....
3  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: Variables from RTC on: March 29, 2013, 08:21:49 am
Try

if ( now.minute() > UP_M ) analogWrite(Warmweiss, brightness);
4  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: How to format time() from 2:23:4 to 02:23:04, add leading zeros. on: March 21, 2013, 12:58:35 pm
Your lucky day...

if( hour() < 10 )
   lcd.print( "0" );
lcd.print( hour() );
5  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: LCD clock demo, No RTC, Serial time set, LCD code help/suggestions please. on: March 21, 2013, 11:01:25 am
But one question, I may have observed that without the clear(), the displayed characters just create one long string, instead of refreshing the string on LCD Line #1.  This continues to Line #3, then to 2, and 4.  Am I wrong? or should there be a command/character to prevent it from scrolling?
Without clear(), lcd.print will print character on last used position. You shoud use lcd.setCursor( 0, 0 ) if you want to start refreshing LCD line #1.
6  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: LCD clock demo, No RTC, Serial time set, LCD code help/suggestions please. on: March 21, 2013, 10:14:56 am
Use couple of variables to store hour, minute, second etc. displayed on LCD. In digitalClockDisplay() add couple of conditions to see what was changed. Example:

if( secondDisplayedOnLcd != second() )
{
  secondDisplayedOnLcd = second();
  lcd.setCursor( proper coordinates for second portion of time on LCD );
  lcd.print( secondDisplayedOnLcd );
}

This way you will update only changed information on LCD - no need for delay() neither clear() in digitalClockDisplay().

Plus, in loop(), you should call digitalClockDisplay() in non-blocking manner. See example sketch for LED flasher without delay() to get idea.
7  Community / Exhibition / Gallery / Re: Alarm clock w/ light control (w/ touch backlight panel) on: March 10, 2013, 02:51:33 pm
Hello World! I made a short video showing basic functionality (HD on youtube site). No sound in video but there is piezo beeping when alarm is triggered on. Timing is customized for better demonstration. Don't turn of annotations to see more info.

First tap on idle panel activates given button group. Consequent taps are interpreted as commands. Alarm settings are backed up in EEPROM after each change. You can snooze alarm as many times as you want. Timeout for LED lights is indicated by very short blink in addition to visual indicator.





(I found that large LCD font on Seetron site. Hoping they do not mind using it in personal, non-commercial project.)
8  Community / Exhibition / Gallery / Re: Alarm clock w/ light control (w/ touch backlight panel) on: March 10, 2013, 02:50:56 pm
Thanks rbqaa.
9  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: HEX Split on: March 10, 2013, 06:14:22 am
hexString[ 0 ] has value '1'
...
hexString[ 5 ] has value 'C'
10  Community / Exhibition / Gallery / Re: Alarm clock w/ light control (w/ touch backlight panel) on: March 08, 2013, 05:01:43 am
Shelf installation. So, I am done with preparation. Assembled shelf is ready to be mounted on wall.



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Step 1. The bed.

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Step 2. Mounted shelf on wall brackets.

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Step 3. Top side of the shelf.


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Step 4. Bracket detail, top.

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Step 5. Bracket detail, bottom.

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Step 6. Bottom view, all components in place.



More to come...
11  Community / Exhibition / Gallery / Re: Alarm clock w/ light control (w/ touch backlight panel) on: March 07, 2013, 06:46:39 am
Case modification. However I decided to imbed the panel deeper to shelf because of high aluminium profile.



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Hollowed out area extending original hole.



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Panel in place. Visible panel high is 4,5 mm instead of 8 mm. Looks much better now.



More to come...
12  Community / Exhibition / Gallery / Re: Alarm clock w/ light control (w/ touch backlight panel) on: March 06, 2013, 02:25:44 pm
Frame building. The touch panel PCB is pretty ugly to be a visible interface itself. I made aluminium frame that has two basic functions - aesthetic element and an aid to hold all layers firmly closely together. There cannot be any gap between layers otherwise the capacitive touch sensing is degraded.

It is quite impossible here to buy aluminium profile I wanted (reasonable ammount for reasonable price) - U profile, 6 mm x 6 mm x 6 mm, so I bought E profile and tuned it. Resulting profile is 6 mm x 8 mm x 6 mm - two milimeters higher then planned. I am considering to hollow out the wooden shelf a little more to imbed the panel couple of milimeters deeper...

Warning: If you are not skilled in metalworking, don't try this at home.



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Step 1. Original spare E profile on left. Spit E profile into U profile and waste.

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Step 2. Four pieces to make up the frame.

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Step 3. Regular glass, 2 mm thick. Ready to cut. Used material has impact on capacitive touch sensing because of it's dielectricum constant and thickness. I tried acrylic glass as well, other thickness as well. I am happy with 2 mm glass.


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Step 4. Final glass layer to protect underlying one from scratches.

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Step 5. All parts are prepared. You can see black mask printed on transparency film. Needed to get sharp backlighted shapes. With cut hole for display to prevent unnecessary reflections. Film is protected by glass layer from previous step.

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Step 6. All frame parts sticked together using hot glue gun.


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Step 7. Final panel is 8 mm high.

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Step 8. When cutting the profiles, be precise, otherwise you get ugly looking corner joints.

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Step 9. Finished touch panel in it's frame.



More to come...
13  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: standalone MEGA 2560 on: March 05, 2013, 07:29:17 am
Guidelines for 328 apply to 2560 as well. See http://arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/ArduinoToBreadboard.
14  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Kid ski helmet led light on: March 05, 2013, 02:49:40 am
I forgot to post the image. Kids were happy. It is modified bicycle rear LED flasher. Two red LEDs at back, two organge LEDs at front. Worked in -10 deg. C.


15  Community / Exhibition / Gallery / Re: Alarm clock (with capacitive touch & backlighted panel) on: March 05, 2013, 01:30:11 am
Case building. This has nothing to do with electronics but it is integral part of the project so I will document it here too.

As I wrote in the first post, there is no space beside our bed for bedside tables. Only suitable place for installation is the wall behind the headboard. Storage space provided by bedside tables will be substituted by this case - shelf. It will contain the control panel and lights as well.

Warning: If you are not skilled in woodworking, don't try this at home.



(Click on the thumbnail to see full size.)


Step 1. Two laminated chipboards, 180 cm x 20 cm in size, 1.8 mm thick each.

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Step 2. Made hole 18 cm x 12 cm to accept the touch panel. Jig saw used.

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Step 3. Made slots for lights. Plunge router with 15 mm bit used.


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Step 4. Hole outline transfered to the top board.

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Step 5. Drawn area hollowed out in top board as the touch panel is 2.5 cm thick.

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Step 6. Both boards stacked.


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Step 7. Other areas hollowed out for controller PCB and wiring.

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Step 8. Slot for controller PCB on the right side.

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Step 9. Both boards sticked together.


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Step 10. All four edges aligned by cutting few millimeters. Circular saw used.

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Step 11. Rounded two edges - safety meassure and aesthetic design.

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Step 12. Prepared aluminium profiles and plastic diffusers.


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Step 13. Applied ABS edge.

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Step 14. Imbeded aliminium profile with sticked LED strip.

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Step 15. Finished case w/o touch panel.



More to come...
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