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1  Using Arduino / Installation & Troubleshooting / Re: x1.0.4 (OSX) not finding a library on: May 07, 2013, 09:50:25 am
OS: 10.6.9, IDE: 1.0.4.  I see you're on a Mac too.

Now, when I use hyphens in the name the IDE doesn't like it and I get the same message - only letters, numbers, and underscores are acceptable.  Also, the 7735 library shows up for me and is always properly recognized but the GFX one doesn't.  Did you try installing that one too and see if it shows up in all four places?
2  Using Arduino / Installation & Troubleshooting / Re: x1.0.4 (OSX) not finding a library on: May 06, 2013, 10:14:14 pm
> "library" or "libraries"?

Oops, you caught me.  'libraries' is correct - where all my other libraries are that work fine. It was late, typing mistake.  ALL my libraries are in the one folder, and the new ST7735 library shows up there.

> Open examples from the File -> Examples menu.  If the examples aren't listed there, the library isn't in the right place.

Again, fatigued typing.  No difference where I open it from - the GFX library doesn't show up except ONE place.

Attached are cropped views of the menus I'm talking about (all snapshotted one right after the other) - I can only find it in the 'Import Library..." menu.
3  Using Arduino / Installation & Troubleshooting / x1.0.4 (OSX) not finding a library on: May 05, 2013, 11:20:27 pm
Has anyone else ever had the software not completely find a library?

I'm working with an Adafruit display - http://www.adafruit.com/products/358 (original 'green tab' one) - and it's been awhile, so I re-downloaded their library for it - https://github.com/adafruit/Adafruit-ST7735-Library - and discovered there's now a companion library - https://github.com/adafruit/Adafruit-GFX-Library.  They got placed in my 'library' folder and were properly renamed to 'Adafruit_ST7735' and 'Adafruit_GFX'.

I wired-up the device, opened the OSX Arduino app, went to the '7735 library's examples folder and opened up their 'graphicstest_highspeed' example.  Did a verify and got a bunch of compiler errors.  I checked my app version (1.0.1) and looked to see the app is now 1.0.4.  Downloaded THAT too since I remembered having loads of compiler errors using stuff developed in v0023 and trying to run them in v1.0.  Same thing happens.

After troubleshooting things for a while I noticed that the GFX library does NOT show up when I click the 'open' icon and cruise to the 'libraries' sub-menu.  Neither does it show up when I go to the menu and do a /File/Examples/.  There IS no examples folder with the GFX library, so I added one (empty folder).  It made no difference.

BUT, if I have a sketch open and do a menu /Sketch/Import Library.../ the GFX library DOES appear and will properly include a  #include <Adafruit_GFX.h>  in my sketch.


Has anyone else encountered this kind of problem before where the app will not completely recognize a library?  If I remark-out the  #include <Adafruit_GFX.h>  in my sketch I get the exact same compiler errors, so I can only figure that the compiler isn't picking-up on the 'Adafruit_GFX' library either.

Any ideas, anyone?
4  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Reading a VFD... on: April 22, 2012, 10:30:35 pm
Crossroads: correct.  Whichever digit line I'm holding, it will only load the shift register with the segment pattern for that digit, and a small array is my lookup table to determine the value of that digit.

As for the multiplexing cadence, my previous experience with VFDs always established the segment pattern before grounding the particular grid, then grid-high, new anode pattern, next grid low, etc...  While it's not impossible for this one to be different I'm HOPING this one works the same way or else I'll have to do a BIT more thinking. smiley-grin

I suppose I could use two shifters in series and successively 'snapshot' the anodes and grids at the same instant - it'd then become a matter of ORing the segments relative to each digit and essentially doing a 'peak hold' until I get a valid number pattern for each digit, then maybe I wouldn't have to worry about cadence so much(?)...  <thinking>

Thanks for bringing cadence to mind.
____
kg4wsv: no, not really.  VFD phosphors aren't like CRT phosphors - a typical display probably doesn't use a filament voltage more than about 3v-5v with 10v-20v for the anodes/grids.  My plan was to connect each anode & grid through a sufficiently high resistor to a 2N2222 as an isolator.  I should be able to determine a decent resistance once I start measuring voltages.

Everything's all on one board with one big VLSI chip, so as I can see it there's not a lot of choice other than deconstructing the display voltages.
5  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Reading a VFD... on: April 22, 2012, 07:13:31 pm
(crossposted from http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/topic,102167.0.html - seems like i should have put it here to begin with)

Here's a problem that's been presented to me this week, and I'm looking for ideas:

We have a device controller with a VFD display in which seven particular digits and two annunciators are very important.  It would be extremely convenient to be able to monitor them from across the lab either visually or aurally (giving me an opportunity to use a http://www.magnevation.com/SpeakJet.swf !).  Each digit has its own cathode, and the segment anodes are all properly chained-together making a nice little multiplexed display.

The controller does a multitude of things with various sensors and signals, and I don't feel like doing more than I have to - so monitoring/processing all those signals is out of the question.  The controller has no output lines I could tie-into which would help me.

MY thought was to connect a 74165 (8->1 shift register) to the anode lines (don't know the operating voltages of the VFD yet, but whatever they are I'm not worried about getting them down to TTL levels), and use a 74595 (1->8 shift register) with logic gates (ANDs and ORs - again I'm not worried about level shifting) to the cathodes…

When I set a particular cathode's corresponding shift register bit on the '595 it would be ANDed with that (level-shifted) cathode's signal.  All the resultant signals from the cathode position AND gates would be OR'ed onto the LOAD line of the '165.  Long-story-short: one-by-one I could latch/capture the anode states for each digit and read them into the Uno and properly decode them.  Then I could either drive another display -or- maybe use the SpeakJet to 'read' them out loud (which would be a LOT of fun).

Everything I've seen in the [displays] forum relates to using VFDs as (obviously) output devices; has anyone here any experience in, essentially, treating the VFD's signals as an INPUT device?  Or is there already an existing chip that DOES this and I'd be 'reinventing the wheel'?

I crave your comments and suggestions.
6  Using Arduino / Displays / 'READING' a VFD…? on: April 19, 2012, 11:04:06 pm
Here's a problem that's been presented to me this week, and I'm looking for ideas:

We have a device controller with a VFD display in which seven particular digits and two annunciators are very important.  It would be extremely convenient to be able to monitor them from across the lab either visually or aurally (giving me an opportunity to use a http://www.magnevation.com/SpeakJet.swf !).  Each digit has its own cathode, and the segment anodes are all properly chained-together making a nice little multiplexed display.

The controller does a multitude of things with various sensors and signals, and I don't feel like doing more than I have to - so monitoring/processing all those signals is out of the question.  The controller has no output lines I could tie-into which would help me.

MY thought was to connect a 74165 (8->1 shift register) to the anode lines (don't know the operating voltages of the VFD yet, but whatever they are I'm not worried about getting them down to TTL levels), and use a 74595 (1->8 shift register) with logic gates (ANDs and ORs - again I'm not worried about level shifting) to the cathodes…

When I set a particular cathode's corresponding shift register bit on the '595 it would be ANDed with that (level-shifted) cathode's signal.  All the resultant signals from the cathode position AND gates would be OR'ed onto the LOAD line of the '165.  Long-story-short: one-by-one I could latch/capture the anode states for each digit and read them into the Uno and properly decode them.  Then I could either drive another display -or- maybe use the SpeakJet to 'read' them out loud (which would be a LOT of fun).

Everything I've seen in the forum relates to using VFDs as (obviously) output devices; has anyone here any experience in, essentially, treating the VFD's signals as an INPUT device?  Or is there already an existing chip that DOES this and I'd be 'reinventing the wheel'?

I crave your comments and suggestions.
7  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: etching/frosting LEDs? on: April 10, 2012, 10:00:04 pm
Actually, the stuff I used is their '7447' material:  http://www.shop3m.com/61500123239.html
8  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: etching/frosting LEDs? on: April 03, 2012, 11:50:09 pm
All done!  I went the Scotchbrite™ route since I have to get this thing finished.  NOT as difficult as I thought it would be (tedium: yeah, a little).

I picked up a sheet (8"x10"?) of their maroon-colored 'super fine' material (not soap-impregnated like a kitchen scrubbing-pad), pinched each LED between thumb and forefinger, and lightly traced a circle (about 4" diameter) while slowly 'orbiting' my wrist to keep the epoxy from developing a concentric pattern of scratches.  I slowly orbited it from about 60º to vertical, and back, in about 20 'circles' (kind of reminded me of my old telescope mirror-grinding days).  Pressed into the pad not even 1mm - a very light touch.

This removed quite a lot of the epoxy, so I dulled-down the pad by working it for a while with a cutoff piece of the pad to remove some of its 'bite' (definitely can feel a big difference between the two sides now).  This worked better - the same grinding cadence gave me an evenly-frosted surface extending down the side of the package to almost the level of the 'cup' containing the chip.  Under a 10x magnifier the very fine surface scratches appear to be well-randomized and I see no 'hot spots' on the surface of the epoxy.

I lit up a clear one in series with a frosted one (i.e. same current): the clear one has maybe a 15º dispersion (and is obviously dark off-axis, with several refractive/reflective zones) and the frosted one, while not quite as bright end-on, maintains very near even brilliance to more than 60º off-axis.  In the future, I'll probably try to manufacture some kind of tube-shaped holder so I can buff an LED all the way down the side to the flange without sacrificing skin or fingernails.   smiley-eek

In all: I am well pleased for the total effort of maybe 1 minute per-LED on the dulled-down side of the pad.  If anyone else tries Scotchbrite™ (or finds an etchant) please post your results here.  Thanks to all for your comments.
9  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: etching/frosting LEDs? on: April 02, 2012, 10:29:18 pm
>LEDs are not so expensive. Why not buy diffuse LEDs in the first place?

I should have mentioned they're 15 candela warm-white ones, this is a one-off project, I already have a bazillion of them, and this is an experiment to see if they'll better-suit a particular application if they're diffuse - so I can't see the sense to trying to look for some.

I've tried sulfuric (80%), nitric (70%), acetic (glacial), phosphoric (80%), HCl (33%), even hydrogen peroxide (25%) with zero results - it's been a busy day.  For the time being, until I can discover anything that WILL etch the epoxy (and I don't have access to a sandblaster), I'll just be buffing them one-by-one as randomly as possible with fine Scotchbrite™ - something possible with a couple-dozen pieces but not desirable if I ever need a greater quantity (where I could 'batch' them with a simple dip/rinse/dry/repeat in an etchant).
10  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / etching/frosting LEDs? on: April 02, 2012, 08:09:21 am
I have a bunch of water-clear LEDs that I'd like to uniformly frost for diffuse illumination.  Has anybody any experience in chemically frosting them?

'Appearance counts', so sitting down and buffing them with sandpaper is rather out of the question.  I haven't purchased anything yet (save the LEDs) and am looking for recommendations for a good etchant.

Thanks!
11  Using Arduino / Storage / Re: SD card variable file name on: October 02, 2011, 09:24:20 pm
I got it working - and can see where I was off and that I need to understand pointers better.  I know I probably shouldn't use "filename" inside-of and outside-of the function, but it compiles and the SD card functions accept it with no problems, so: <shrug>.

Thank you Paul.
Ex uno disce omnes
___
in setup:
char filename[] = "00000000.CSV";

function call:
getFilename(filename);

function:
  void getFilename(char *filename) {
    DateTime now = RTC.now(); int year = now.year(); int month = now.month(); int day = now.day();
    filename[0] = '2';
    filename[1] = '0';
    filename[2] = year%10 + '0';
    filename[3] = year%10 + '0';
    filename[4] = month/10 + '0';
    filename[5] = month%10 + '0';
    filename[6] = day/10 + '0';
    filename[7] = day%10 + '0';
    filename[8] = '.';
    filename[9] = 'C';
    filename[10] = 'S';
    filename[11] = 'V';
    return;
  }
12  Using Arduino / Storage / Re: SD card variable file name on: September 29, 2011, 02:14:02 pm
Um, WHILE we're on the subject of filenames on SD cards...  :\

My intent is to log sporadic events to an SD card, tagging them with the time.  I'd like to save a file-a-day and create the new file at midnight.  Embedding the ten bold lines below gives me a workable filename which changes correctly at midnight and the code recognizes it and everything's fine.

BUT, when I try to make a function out of it (I'll need to check for the date rollover several times in my code) I can't get the function to return anything when I do a "if(! SD.exists(filename)) {...}" later on.  (the error says "invalid conversion from 'char*' to 'char'" and highlights "return filename;" in the function)

Up until now I've pretty much banged everything out inside the regular setup and loop functions and this is my first real experience with making my own function and returning variables...  Everybody's comments & criticisms are appreciated.

  char getFilename() {
    DateTime now = RTC.now(); int year = now.year(); int month = now.month(); int day = now.day();
    char filename[] = "00000000.CSV";
    filename[0] = '2';
    filename[1] = '0';
    filename[2] = year%10 + '0';
    filename[3] = year%10 + '0';
    filename[4] = month/10 + '0';
    filename[5] = month%10 + '0';
    filename[6] = day/10 + '0';
    filename[7] = day%10 + '0';

    return filename;
  }
13  Community / Website and Forum / an orphan Reference page? on: April 01, 2011, 10:49:38 pm
I accidentally came across the page [http://www.arduino.cc/en/Reference/PortManipulation] and I don't see how it links-back to [http://arduino.cc/en/Reference/HomePage].

Has anyone else found command descriptions not linked on the main Reference page?  It can save a LOT of programming for those not intimately familiar with the command names...
14  Using Arduino / Interfacing w/ Software on the Computer / Re: Win7 communication via USB? on: February 23, 2011, 11:26:24 am
Thanks all!  I'll download PuTTY and see if that company machine doesn't notice it's running.
Hopefully there's no special magic involved to get PuTTY reading the serial data via the USB?

I'm normally Mac-only and this is an occasion to spawn something to a Win7 machine so the individual can do her OWN data capture.
15  Using Arduino / Interfacing w/ Software on the Computer / Win7 communication via USB? on: February 22, 2011, 01:22:54 pm
Situation: microsoft erased Hyperterminal from Win7 and didn't TELL me.  I am unable (employer says so and IT has the machine 'locked up' against installs) to install the Arduino development environment onto a particular machine to use the serial monitor.  I have an Uno programmed to read analog voltages, perform some calculations, and squirt the results out via a Serial.println at 9600 baud.

Question: what options exist for me to read the USB port I'm plugged-into and save the readings to a text file?  Is there a self-contained app that will save the usb/serial to a file without installing anything else anywhere?
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